Find us on Google+ Jobs for Felons: How felons can get jobs
  • Home
  • About Me
  • Ask Me A Question
Showing posts with label Job Search. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Job Search. Show all posts

Friday, October 12, 2018

Good References help Ex-offenders and Felons get Jobs

Good References help Ex-offenders and Felons get Jobs

 

Good References help Ex-offenders and Felons get Jobs
More and more employers are paying attention to references when trying to decide who to hire.  Ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs should have good references that will help them make a good impression on employers.  There are employers that will hire a felon.  A strong set of references from the right people can help you get hired.

In short, references are upstanding members of the community who could attest to your character and/or abilities. A  set of great references could help an employer look past your background.  Ideal people to have as references would be religious leaders, former teachers, former classmates, former employers and local political leaders. 

Good References help Ex-offenders and Felons get Jobs
Most applications ask for three references.  You should always have at least four just in case.  Be prepared to list a name, title, and contact information for each one.  Make sure you have good contact information and keep it updated because over time, phone numbers, titles and addresses change.  Always be sure your information is current.

It is always a good idea to get permission from anyone you wish to use a reference. No one wants to be caught off guard and get a call out of the blue from a prospective employer.  Once you have your set of references and contact information, keep your list in your job search folder for easy access when it is time to fill out an application.

One thing to remember is, only offer references when they are requested.  They are far too valuable to be used as casual information.  When putting a resume together, never put them in the resume itself.  Include a line that may say "References will be furnished on demand.

Ex-offenders and felons can increase their chances to get jobs by getting some great references.

There are a great number of companies that will hire a felon or ex-offender.  There is a link below to a large list of companies that hire felons.  Now, bear in mind that these companies will not hire you just because you are a felon.  These companies will hire a person who is a felon if he/she is the best person for the job.  Getting some great references will put you in a better position to jet a job.


Jobs for Felons : Tips for Collecting Job References

Jobs for Felons: Using Personal Data Sheets to get Jobs

Jobs for Felons: Employment Applications

Jobs for Felons: 3 Most Common Mistakes Made on Employment Applications


Please Rate This Post at the Top!


Good References help Ex-offenders and Felons get Jobs

 Good References help Ex-offenders and Felons get Jobs

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Good References help Ex-offenders and Felons get Jobs


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | References for Felons

Read More

Sunday, May 6, 2018

Disabled felon needs help finding jobs

Disabled felon needs help finding jobs


Jobs for disabled FelonsHello,

I am Shaun. I was convicted of assault with a deadly weapon inflicting serious injury about 6-7 
yrs ago. I am a barber now, however I have an injury now that has put me out of work. I desire a new career but have much concern as to what I should go into because of my past. Do you have any advice for me or maybe people that would like to help me.

sincerely,

Shaun

 

 



Disabled felon needs help finding jobs




Hello Shaun,

I suggest you contact your local One-Stop Career Center. There you will find a list of services that can help ex-offenders and felons find new careers including training and job search services. Most Career centers have counselors who have experience assisting ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs. There are also contacts with other agencies that offer vocational rehabilitation and employment opportunities for those with disabilities.

You can find the nearest One-stop Career Center here:


 www.servicelocator.org
 


Please Rate This Post at the Top!



Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Disabled felon needs help finding jobs

Disabled felon needs help finding jobs



companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

Read More

Saturday, April 21, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Navigating a Digital World After 40 Years in Prison

Aaron Mondry - Splinter News - Detroit

 Navigating a Digital World After 40 Years in Prison



Edward Minor had a paper due for his English class on income inequality at Wayne County Community College in Detroit. He’d completed all the research and knew what he wanted to write. The main issue was time—he only had a few hours.

But countless, frustrating obstacles delayed his progress, from the laborious pace at which 62-year-old Minor types to figuring out how to save his document. The final step, however, was really tripping him up. Since he was using a computer at the library, he needed to email the file to himself so he could edit it later on a different computer.

“Do I just put my email address up here?” Minor asked, pointing to the bar at the top of the web browser. Eventually he got some help from a computer technician, but he wasn’t confident he’d be able to find the document later.

“They’re doing it so fast and I’m trying to follow,” he says. “They don’t see that there’s a baby right here in front of them. I’m a baby out here!”

Jobs for Felons: Navigating a Digital World After 40 Years in Prison




Ed Minor types at the Detroit Public Library, wearing a pin with a photo of Angela Davis.
Photo: Nick Hagen

Indeed, Minor’s relationship to the world isn’t so different from that of an infant. That’s because, in October 2017, Minor was released from prison after being incarcerated for more than 40 years. A modern-day Rip Van Winkle (who left society for a mere two decades), Minor is adrift in a society that left him behind.

The hunt-and-peck typing method he employs, which itself is slower than usual, is just the beginning of his technological difficulties. The computers, wireless internet, and touch screens that many take for granted are alien to him. Even looking at a computer screen—with all its strange icons, commands, and windows—is like deciphering the Rosetta Stone.
While Minor may be an extreme case, he squarely fits the description of Americans who suffer most from the digital divide, a phenomenon that describes how technology can contribute to inequality: He’s elderly, he’s poor, and he’s a person of color.

Resolving the divide’s underlying issues will be anything but simple, but the negative effects are pretty straightforward. If you don’t have access to the internet or the skills to use it, you also won’t have access to countless jobs and resources. As Tom Wheeler, former chair of the FCC, said in 2015, “The bottom line is this: If you are not connected to the internet…you cannot participate fully in our economy and our democracy.”

As of 2015, Detroit was the least connected city in America. Forty percent of Detroit’s households have no broadband connection and 70 percent of its school-age kids have no internet access at home (excluding smartphones).

For its size, Detroit is woefully under-connected. But rural areas and small metropolises often have it worse. According to a Brookings Institute report, almost one in four people in the United States lived in low subscription neighborhoods in 2015. Fewer than 40 percent of households subscribed to broadband internet.

Price is often an inhibiting factor. Detroit’s two main broadband providers, Comcast and AT&T, respectively, offer plans for their slowest connections at $25 for 12 months (and $50 afterwards) and $40 per month with a $99 installation fee.


Jobs for Felons: Navigating a Digital World After 40 Years in Prison




Ed Minor
Photo: Nick Hagen

Federal programs can lower the cost of these plans, but a study by the National Digital Inclusion Alliance (NDIA) showed that in Cleveland and Detroit, AT&T didn’t built out the infrastructure sufficiently to provide residents with high enough connection speeds to meet program guidelines. In other words, there’s a major correlation between plan availability and poverty.

The NDIA has described this as “digital redlining,” a reference to the practice that denied people of color access to housing, and which ran rampant in Detroit in the mid-1900s.

That’s in line with what Diana Nucera, director of the Detroit Community Technology Project, has witnessed. “Whether it’s artificial intelligence or internet access or healthcare,” she says, “the problems of the digital divide all stem from the same place: racism.”

I described Minor’s situation to Nucera and asked what she thought. “If he’s a victim of the digital divide, he’s also a victim of several other things before that,” she says. “It’s much more complicated than giving this gentleman a computer.”

Before Minor ever went to prison, understanding modern-day technology was the least of his concerns.

He came from a challenging home life. “My family were alcoholics,” he says. “I never met my mother’s side of the family. My father’s side was just drunks, dope fiends, dealing in corn liquor. My father was always jumping on my mother; my uncles were always jumping on their girlfriends.”
That contributed to his feeling aimless as a youth growing up on Detroit’s west side. “I didn’t know what to do with my life,” he says. “Didn’t want to do anything with my life.”
As for technology, his family didn’t even own a color TV.

“The problems of the digital divide all stem from the same place: racism.”





Minor was imprisoned once for seven months for breaking and entering. When he was released, he wanted to pay back a favor for a friend that helped him out while in prison. But the only way he knew how to get the money was to steal it. Planning to mug someone outside a nightclub, he says he brought an unloaded BB gun whereas his co-defendant, without telling him, brought a real gun.

According to Minor, his accomplice shot the person they were mugging, and after they were arrested, made a statement saying Minor committed the murder. Minor says he was pressured by his lawyer and the judge to plead guilty to second degree murder.
The sentence: life with parole.

Navigating a Digital World After 40 Years in Prison




Ed Minor checks the bus schedule on his phone.
Photo: Nick Hagen
Since getting out of prison, Minor has lived with his cousin in Southfield, an adjacent suburb of Detroit about 15 miles from downtown. On a normal day, Minor wakes up at around 11am, eats breakfast, and takes an hour and a half-long, two-bus transfer journey—with an undersized bicycle in tow—to either the WCCC campus or Detroit Public Library’s main branch. There he’ll do school work and develop his computer skills for several hours before heading to his job as a dishwasher at a nearby restaurant.

He often closes out, which means leaving work at around midnight and catching one of the last rapid buses heading north. At that time of night, the bus no longer runs for the last four-mile leg home, so he either bikes or walks depending on the weather. Once, the bus never came and his co-worker paid for a rideshare. He rarely gets into bed before 3am.

While at the downtown library, the person assisting him is often Keronce Sims, a computer technician. He teaches classes on computing basics, but his main job is helping patrons and employees troubleshoot computer issues. That means he’s often running from one request to the next all day long.

“What aren’t I responsible for?” Sims says with a laugh. “I’m one of three in the building…I’m putting out some matches, some candles, some fires.”

Local libraries are common destinations for people without computers or internet access. Detroit’s main branch has about 80 computers and there’s no time limit on how long someone can use one or, aside from games and X-rated content, what they can use them for.


In his 30 years at the library, Sims has seen all types of people use the computers for every conceivable reason: to apply for assistance, look for work, write a thesis, sue someone, or just to watch videos and go on Facebook.

Sometimes, according to Sims, people have panic attacks when trying to take care of a stressful matter using a machine they don’t understand. “I see it all the time,” he says. “I see a lot of impairments. Some are dyslexic, some are recovering from a physical injury or a stroke. Some are visually impaired. I’ve seen people with missing digits.”

Sims has been working with Minor since the summer and is encouraged by his effort. “Some people inquire about our services but don’t show up,” he says. “But [Minor] showed up. He knew nothing at first—the whole digital world was foreign to him.”


Navigating a Digital World After 40 Years in Prison




Keronce Sims helps Ed Minor navigate a computer at the Detroit Public Library.
Photo: Nick Hagen

In addition to having a felony on his record, little free time in his daily life, bad eyesight, hyperthyroidism, and no car, Minor also has very little money, and few people he can rely on besides his cousin. He’s also battling the type of culture shock that has nothing to do with the digital world. Simply going to the supermarket is a stressful experience that results in decision paralysis. “I stick to chocolate or vanilla ice cream and white socks,” he says.

As director of DCTP, Nucera oversees programs that foster use of technology based on community need. One of those programs is the Equitable Internet Initiative, which will provide 150 Detroit households with high-speed internet access. The program also involved training 25 local “digital stewards,” two of whom were in their late seventies, in hardware installation and WiFi setup. Age matters, but it’s not the primary barrier.

Minor has a passion for housing. After he’s done taking his prerequisites at WCCC, he’s planning to take classes on real estate. Despite everything he’s been through, he’s remarkably optimistic.
“Oh, it’s gonna get done,” he says. “Keep doing what I’m doing, don’t cry about it, move with it. I feel I’m on a mission.”

Sims and Nucera both think he has the capacity to overcome his technological difficulties.
“Clearly he’s extremely resilient,” Nucera says. “You don’t come out of prison after 40 years as an optimistic man without having a sense of self and being very intelligent. It’s not about his ability to learn. It’s about whether or not society can accept someone who’s been in prison for that long.”



Updated List of Companies that Hire Ex-offenders and Felons


Navigating a Digital World After 40 Years in Prison




companies hire felonscompanies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

Eric Mayo

Read More

Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Felons must be honest when applying for jobs

Felons must be honest when applying for jobs

 

 Be Honest
Hello,

I'm from Texas. I have a Felony/Theft charge on my background from 2008 and been on a 5yr probation about 3 years now. After about 3 weeks of job search, this past week I was hired on the spot as a sales associate at Academy. Then today, I was let go because of the felony charge, which i lied about on the application. Should I try talking to the manager and explain my situation? I know, i should just be upfront and put it down on the application, but not sure how to word it properly. What are some things to put on applications, when asked about criminal history? My degree is in Teaching and so have not tried those type of jobs. I also, have experience in, retail, food service, office. If you have other suggestions, please feel free to, share them. I'm glad I found your website. It helps having someone to share this with. Sometimes it gets very depressing. I just want to get my life moving in a positive direction. Anyway, thanks for your help. I look forward to hearing back from you.

Sue

Felons must be honest when applying for jobs



Hello Sue,
 
Felons must be honest when applying for jobs
That is a common mistake by ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs. Some believe by being honest they don’t have a chance at getting a job. The fact is an employer cannot legally refuse to hire you because you have a criminal record unless the conviction is directly related to the job for which you are applying. I have spoken with former inmates who have lied on applications and gotten jobs, only to lose them later when background checks were done. Some have been encouraged to use the response “Will discuss at interview.”  For ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, applications present a dilemma. Lie or not to lie. I advise job seekers to always be honest. If you are dishonest about your past, you risk having the truth exposed later. You may get a job only to lose it after the employer finds out the truth through a background check. You will be fired for being deceitful, not because you have a criminal record.In my opinion, these are not good practices. The best advice I can give is BE HONEST! Employers have a responsibility to know as much as possible about prospective employees.

As for applying for other jobs, you should always apply for any job you feel you qualify for. Never talk yourself out of a job.

If you chosen profession is teaching, public schools aren't you only option. You may not be eligible to teach in public schools but there are other options. Community colleges, adult learning annexes, private and charter schools are great places to start. They usually have fewer regulatory restrictions than public school systems.


I hope this helps.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felons must be honest when applying for jobs


How to get a job with a criminal record



Felons must be honest when applying for jobs


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Jobs Felons can get

Read More

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?

Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?


Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?
Hello sir,

I have a question. I am currently in the process of applying to work for the New York City Board of Education but I am worried that I may not get the job because I have a juvenile conviction. I was arrested on grounds for felony for reckless endangerment but I took a plea bargain and opted out for a misdemeanor instead. I was arrested back 91/2 years ago.

I have to get my fingerprints taken and have a background check done on me so I am nervous that my conviction will pop up. And I have a sealed record but I am wondering will that also affect anything in my applying to work for the New York City board of Education.



I get a lot of questions like this from juvenile ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs.

Let me understand. You are afraid that a 9 1/2 yr. old juvenile misdemeanor conviction will stop the New York City Board of Education from hiring you.

Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?It is my understanding that juvenile records are sealed and can only be seen by the court system, law enforcement and government agencies. Even if it were public, I doubt anyone would hold a 9 1/2 yr. old juvenile misdemeanor charge against you.

Here in NJ where I am, job applicants are not even bound to include juvenile convictions. I'm not sure about NY state. To be absolutely sure, I would contact someone in your local legal aid office for clarification.

I hope this helps.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights






 Companies that Hire Felons

Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!


Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Juvenile Record

Read More

Monday, October 23, 2017

Felon with professional experience needs a job

Felon with professional experience needs a job

Felon with professional experience needs a job
Hello,

Thanks for creating your Blogspot on information for Ex-offenders. I am a first time offender who was convicted in 2007 and is having a hard time with gainful employment. I have approximately 17 years of human resources experience in the federal government service and 2.5 years of retail service. My felony is one of moral turpitude (forgery/utter forged check/obtaining money by false pretenses) which makes it difficult because of the trust factor. I would like to know if you have any recommendations for me to seeking gainful employment. I am currently on indefinite supervised probation for the payment of my restitution. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

  Felon with professional experience needs a job



Hello,

Felon with professional experience needs a jobOften convictions involving integrity or any type of theft conviction are often some of the toughest to overcome. I would suggest you contact the United Way in your office. The United Way supports a number of social services some of which offer assistance to ex-offenders and felons in need of jobs and other forms ex-offender / felon advocacy groups that know of companies that hire people with criminal backgrounds.
of aid. There may be positions for qualified professionals available in one of their member organizations. They may also be able to put you in contact with

Felon with professional experience needs a jobIn the meantime, since you have clerical experience, I suggest you try temporary employment.  In many cases, temporary jobs turn into permanent jobs.  For ex-offenders and felons looking to get temp jobs, I suggest applying to small independent agencies rather the nationally known ones.  Smaller agencies can hire whomever they feel will be good.  The larger companies are more likely to have restrictions regarding the hiring of people with criminal records.  Take a look at the link below:


Temporary Agencies are a good Choice for Ex-offenders and Felons


I hope this helps.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon with professional experience needs a job

Felon with professional experience needs a job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felon with professional experience needs a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Read More

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Felon wants job as Cosmetologist

Felon wants job as Cosmetologist


Felon wants job as Cosmetologist
Cosmetology Jobs for Felons
I am an LPN and have first offender charges of prescription fraud (doctor shopping) on my record. Due to injuries sustained in an auto accident and medications needed and prescribed by my neurologist, I can no longer practice as a nurse. I have undergone extensive counseling and am still paying fines. I wanted to contest the charges due to my medical records supporting my prescriptions. I instead was advised to take these charges to avoid another more severe charge.



My question is, can my charges on my record affect my application and testing to be a licensed cosmetologist? I want to be a productive citizen of society and support my son and myself. I want to try something else and I think I can and will enjoy this field but want to know these things before I invest the money in training.


Felon wants job as Cosmetologist



Felon wants job as CosmetologistUnfortunately you are forced to change careers.  Barbering/Cosmetology is a great field to get into not only for employment but there are are opportunities for self-employment down the line.  I know of felons who have good careers in that field.  I would suggest that you contact the Cosmetology Licensing Board in your state. They will be able to tell you if you are eligible.  If you are unemployed, you may even be eligible for for free training through your state's department of labor


Please Rate This Post at the Top!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon wants job as Cosmetologist


Felon wants job as Cosmetologist

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felon wants job as Cosmetologist


 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Cosmetology Jobs for Felons

Read More

Monday, October 2, 2017

Felon wants a Military Career

Felon wants a Military Career

Felon wants a Military Career

Can I Join the Army with a Felony?

Hello I hope you can help......

Well I was charged with failure to stop after having an accident involving personal injury and I'm a little misunderstanding of what it means for it being a class four felony. I want to get into the military cuz lets face it at this point in time the chances of me getting a decent job to support me and family is really really low with this charge on me.

 I don't see any other options cuz from wut I have been gathering with web browsing you can't get certain certificates and degrees to work and money is not real good at the moment to just lolly gag so my questions are as follows

1. Can I get it expunged?

2. Is it a felony misdemeanor

3. How would I go about tryin to get in the military with this?

4. What states would this not count as a felony....... and I'm sorry if its a lot or jus very scrambled. I want the best for my child and wife so I'm a little everywhere with this but I'm looking forward to this response thank you.


Ernesto

  Felon wants a Military Career



Hello Ernesto,

Questions 1, 2 and 4 are best answered by an attorney. Often ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs need legal assistance. I suggest contacting your local legal aid office. There you will probably be able to get low-cost or low-cost legal advice. They may be also be able to answer questions about ex-offenders and felons getting professional certifications. 

Felon wants a Military Career
Just a note on expungement, it is not an option in every state.  Even in states which allow them, often they are limited.  For example, in New Jersey, where I am, one is allowed only one felony expungement.  It cannot even be applied for until ten years after the termination of the sentence.  Expungement is not a cure all.  Even if one is granted, the conviction will always be visible to the court system, government agencies and law enforcement.

Felon wants a Military Career
Don't give up on a military career. The military often accepts ex-offenders and felons and there are many career options. Your best option is the Army. The Army seems to be the most liberal as it relates to accepting ex-offenders and felons. Contact you local Army recruiter to inquire about your eligibility.

I hope this helps.

Please Rate This Post at the Top!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Truth About Background Checks

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
 Felon wants a Military Career

 Felon wants a Military Career

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felon wants a Military Career



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Felons Can Join Military

Read More

Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Felon with old conviction needs a job

Felon with old conviction needs a job

 
Felon with old conviction needs a job
Dear Sir,

My name is Anthony, and I’m currently 49 years old. I am having severe difficulties obtaining employment due to a crime (convicted of Attempted Robbery 1) I committed when I was 16. I was convicted at 18, and served 3 years in the N.Y. penal system. I’ve worked as a machinist for over 25 years, and since 2005, in industrial sales. I was just on a 2 1/2 hour job interview today, which looked extremely promising – until I was asked if I had ever been convicted of a crime. I was informed 40 min. ago that I would not be considered due to this. What are the costs? I will pay whatever is necessary to have this sealed and get my life on track.

Why, 31 years later, is this haunting me now more than ever? Thanks,

Anthony

Felon with old conviction needs a job



Your difficulty finding jobs may be more a symptom of the present economy rather that you being a felon. Ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs are particularly hit hard by this tough job market.

Felon with old conviction needs a job
As far as sealing your conviction, you may have to seek legal assistance to see if this is a viable option in your state. May I suggest your local legal aid office. There you will find low-cost or even no-cost assistance as well as advice on you options in your state, Check you local telephone directory for the nearest legal aid office.  Bear in mind that sealing your record does have its limitations.  It will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies.

Felon with old conviction needs a jobNext, I suggest to all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs to visit their local One-stop Career center. One-stop Career Centers are underutilized resources that can provide a wide array of services that you help you find a job or start a new career.

You can find your nearest One-stop Career Center here:

One-Stop Career Centers

In the meantime take a look at the video below:

Please Rate This Post at the Top!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon with old conviction needs a job

Felon with old conviction needs a job

Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Read More

Monday, August 21, 2017

Felons should always be honest applying for jobs

Felons should always be honest applying for jobs

Felons should always be honest applying for jobs

Tight job market is good for felons, people with disabilities

and others who are hard to employ

I was arrested in May of 2008 for the charge of burglary. I took a plea agreement that lessened the conviction to Felony Trespassing (3rd degree) in New Jersey. My question is if potential employers will see something like Trespassing as just as bad as any other felony or if I am worrying too much and thinking I will be constantly passed over for jobs because I am grouped in the same "Felony" category as people who have committed violent crimes, robbery, and etc. I have a college degree and 2 years work experience in a media-related field but keep applying to jobs with the notion that my charges are always going to hold me back from getting a job within the field of media, marketing, and promotion. With so many employers conducting background checks, I just want to see how a Felony Trespassing charge looks to them and if I am still hireable. Thank you so much for taking the time to help a person in need.

-A

Felons should always be honest applying for jobs


Hello A,

Felons should always be honest applying for jobsI encourage all ex-offenders and felons to always be honest when applying for jobs.  Your situation isn't as bad as it seems. Trespassing is a relatively minor offense and there are no integrity questions surrounding it. Whenever the question comes up on an application or on an interview, be honest. Typically on an application, the question will be, "Have you been convicted of a crime other than a traffic violation?" You will answer honestly.

In reference to convictions, it is necessary to list all relative information. Include the name of
the conviction, date, location, and the disposition (time served, fine and/or probation.)

Example:


Trespassing (isolated incident) 8/12/08 Newark, NJ Probation 6 mos

I used the notation "isolated incident." It gives the impression that you are not a criminal, but a person that just found himself in a bad situation...something that can happen to anyone. If the question comes up, don't go into detail, just give an answer just like that.

The most important thing I suggest to all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs is to be honest. there no sense in being dishonest only to lose a job when a background check is done.

I hope this helps


Please Rate This Post at the Top!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felons should always be honest applying for jobs

Felons should always be honest applying for jobs

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

  Felons should always be honest applying for jobs



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Read More

Thursday, July 13, 2017

Felon feels background checks are unfair

Felon feels background checks are unfair

Felon feels background checks are unfair

What happens when a potential employer does a background check on you 

Hi Eric,


Thanks for allowing this email, and starting your blog. Although I do not know your credentials, or where you get your knowledge, just knowing there is an open discourse is helpful to those of us who feel desperate.

I am an ex offender who was convicted in 1977, and 1978 for 2 separate offenses. 

1977 robbery- this was a teenage indiscretion of joyriding in a stolen car with someone who lifted a set of keys from a key hook on the wall in a home where we attended a party and then, staying silent after we were caught. The robbery charge is because the keys were stolen from inside the home, making it a point of law 1978 for possession of a controlled substance. The reason I give that summary is to articulate the injustice of this practice of culling ex-offenders from the workforce. Particularly someone who has not been in trouble for over 33 years. Especially when, for decades, I have been employed successfully. In fact, I have a B.A. and an Associates in Applied Science degree- both with honors. I am currently unemployed, and unable to get past the background requirements for employment, and have been eliminated from numerous jobs that I would otherwise have gotten.

 My question's are these:

1.) How is it not a violation of our constitutional rights for a potential employer to data mine our info. without standing? And, have us self incriminate as a pre-employment requirement? Isn't the Constitutional protections for minority rights?

2.) What are the statistics of ex- offenders currently in USA? In other words how many millions of people are affected by this practice? Has this been challenged in the courts?
My belief is that our Constitution is piece of paper that becomes animated by the people who stand up for their own rights. After all, it is the minority that needs the protections, not majority opinion. That is the purpose of the document. Furthermore, without class action, the ACLU will not challenge this practice. How could we mount a class action challenge to this practice? I could go on ad infinitum, but I will just close with a sincere thank you for the work you are doing to help others get through this.


Best Regards,

Pablo

Felon feels background checks are unfair



Felon feels background checks are unfair

“Ban the Box” and Background Checks


Hello Pablo,

It is the responsibility of every employer to hire the best person they can find for any job. Having a criminal record does not necessarily eliminate you from consideration from any job. An employer is trying to get some idea of the type of people that are applying.

Too often with ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs assume that they were maligned because because they have criminal convictions. In many cases the may be correct but that is
difficult or nearly impossible to prove. I am of African descent. I have often thought that was the reason that I didn't get many jobs that I know I was more than qualified for. Rather that wallow in anger and self-pity, my other choice was to keep applying for each and every job I felt I fit.

When speaking of the laws and the constitution, being a child of the sixties, I can tell you that laws do not change attitudes. Laws may say that I am equal but until individual prejudices go away.

My advice is to not give in to your frustrations but let them motivate you.

I hope this helps.



Please Rate This Post at the Top!



What is a Background Check? The Truth About Background Checking   


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon feels background checks are unfair

Felon feels background checks are unfair

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felon feels background checks are unfair



 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Employee Background Checks| Background Checks

Read More