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Showing posts with label employment.jobs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label employment.jobs. Show all posts

Friday, December 21, 2018

Mom is a Felon and Cannot find a Job

 Mom is a Felon and Cannot find a Job




Mom is a Felon and Cannot find a Job
Hello,

I was just checking out your page with the list of jobs for felons I have been seriously looking having interviews but haven't had any luck I'm a first time felon never been in trouble my whole life made a mistake last yr by cashing a scam check that was sent to me in the mail and at the time I was really in need for money I'm a single mother my child's father is incarcerated. I'm charged in Virginia. My charge is felony false pretense to obtain money.  I only got charged because the store owner pressed charges.  The District Attorney didn't want to have charges against me because I have a good background.  I couldn't pay off the restitution before my final court date and now I am on probation indefinitely  because I didn't have to do any time. I have worked for the state of Virginia before in a mental health facility.  I also worked as a kitchen supervisor in a prison when I was younger and I have a lot of customer service skills. I haven't had a job since last year.  I was working on a military base at a store but they let me go because my charge was pending at the time. My question to you is what jobs or companies are more likely to hire someone with a background like mine?


Mom is a Felon and Cannot find a Job

Hello,

I'm sorry you are having such a hard time finding work.  Unfortunately too many people give up future employment opportunities by making bad decisions.  Because your convictions falls into the category of theft/ robbery/ larceny, your integrity is in question.  My suggestion is to avoid applying for job that have anything to do with working with money or anything of value.  That would eliminate most cashier and retail jobs.

I have had students in your situations.  A few of them are working for telemarketing companies while others are working in supermarkets and factories.

Apply for Temporary Employment

I often encourage my students that have marketable skills, to apply for temporary employment.  Temporary jobs is a good way for ex-offenders and felons searching for jobs to get back into the working world.  According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics, since 2009, temporary jobs have made up about 19% of all new jobs. This due to companies looking to temporary employment agencies as a way to keep labor costs down.  Companies hire temporary employees for a number of reasons.  One reason is that it is up to the staffing agency to screen and interview employees.  Time is money and the less time used in the
Mom is a Felon and Cannot find a Job
hiring process, the better for the company.  If temp employees prove to be good at what they do and fit in well with the rest of the company, many are hired permanently.  Temporary workers can be very attractive to small companies. They can staff their businesses at a lower cost than regular full-time employees with benefits, which is  advantageous when they do not have the resources to employ a more permanent staff.

There is a twist when looking for temporary jobs.  There are two basic types of staffing agencies.  First there are the large, nationally know companies.  Companies like Adecco, Kelly Services and other big companies have hiring practices that are set at their corporate offices.  These practices may prohibit their local offices from hiring people with criminal records.  Some of them do, and some of them do not.  The other companies are smaller privately owned staffing agencies.  Because these smaller agencies are locally owned, they make their own rules regarding who they hire.  They can hire whomever they wish.  Ex-offenders and felons stand a greater chance of getting hired at these smaller agencies.

Get Help from your Local One-stop Career Center

One-Stop Career Centers are organized to furnish a full range of assistance to job seekers. The centers offer training referrals, career counseling, job listings, and similar employment-related services.  These centers are the best place for job seekers to get every thing they need for a successful job search.  If you need a resume,
Mom is a Felon and Cannot find a Job
you can get help getting one.  If you need interviewing skills, there are classes that can help you with developing them.  There computers that may be used to access the internet to search for jobs.  Each center also has lists of open positions in your immediate area.  Every center has counselors that can provide individualized assistance.  There also may be opportunities to get training for a new career.  With so many services available, I don't know why more people don't use these centers.  You can find the center nearest to you at the website below:


The Federal Bonding Program

Because you have a theft related conviction, you may want to look into the Federal Bonding Program.  A bond is an insurance policy that are issued in the name of an employee that protects the employer from losses due to theft by the employee.  More employers hire ex-offenders and felons than can get bonded.  Unfortunately some insurance companies will issue bonds for employees that have theft or related convictions.  The federal government makes it easier for certain people to get bonded that may not be able to be bonded by private companies.  This is a good selling point on an interview if you point out that you can be bonded.  You can read more about the Federal Bonding Program by clicking the link to another blog post I have here:

Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get Jobs

The best of luck to you

Eric Mayo


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Female felon in MD needs job assistance

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  Mom is a Felon and Cannot find a Job

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Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Meet Larry, an ex-offender who got a second chance thanks to a good law









Meet Larry, an ex-offender who got a second chance thanks to a good law
Last year, I wrote a highly critical opinion piece for the Sun-Times about Gov. Bruce Rauner after learning that he had denied clemency for a client of mine.

Given Rauner’s extreme reluctance to grant clemency to ex-offenders, even to those like my client who had gone on to live honest and productive lives for many years, I questioned why anybody would bother to file the petition.

Though I couldn’t  know it at the time, however, that same governor soon would lay the groundwork for my client to earn a second chance. In August 2017, Rauner signed House Bill 2373 into law. This legislation resulted in a significant expansion of the kinds of criminal records a judge can decide to seal from public view.

Last month, as a result of that law, a judge granted my client’s petition to seal his record, closing the book on my client’s addiction-fueled criminal conduct, which began when he was 17 and ended when he was 31.  Today, he is 51.

My client’s story, which he has given me permission to tell as long as I don’t use his real name, reminds us that people who make bad decisions as teens and young adults still can grow into law-abiding, productive members of society. If we don’t start believing in our human capacity to change — to learn from our mistakes — we will fail to see the potential in many of our fellow, returning citizens.

My client, Larry, grew up in Chicago with an alcoholic father. His mother managed apartment buildings. Neither of his parents graduated from high school. Larry himself struggled in school, and was diagnosed with dyslexia in the fifth grade. Once assigned to special ed classes, he was teased and bullied relentlessly.

The summer before Larry entered high school, he started drinking beer. By his freshman year, he was smoking weed and using cocaine. He dropped out of school after his sophomore year. A year later, he was arrested for the first time.

He was charged with felony burglary and sentenced to probation.

In no time at all, Larry had gone from high school dropout to convicted felon. His future did not bode well. It is estimated that more than 70 percent of the men and women in United States prisons did not graduate from high school.

Larry’s next arrest, for residential burglary, occurred while he was still on probation. He was sentenced to prison – the first of two prison stints he would serve before turning 20. Larry’s preferred choice of crime? Breaking into cars, though he wasn’t particularly good at it. He was usually drunk or high when arrested.

In 1990, Larry picked up his fourth — and final — felony conviction. He was spared prison, though, sentenced instead to an intensive, in-patient drug treatment.

Larry struggled with his sobriety for another 10 years. But a health scare in 2000 finally convinced him to stop drinking and drugging.

Today, Larry takes his sobriety seriously. He has been sober for nearly 18 years. He attends Alcoholics Anonymous meetings three times a week.

A couple of years ago, he met his wife at an AA meeting. With her encouragement and support, he started meeting with a literacy tutor. At the time, his reading comprehension was that of a second grader. Today, he can read at a fifth-grade level.

So there you have it: Larry is sober. He can read a bit better. And he always manages to work for a living, despite his significant educational deficits. The jobs he has found, such as valet parking attendant, don’t pay well, but they are honorable and he has gotten by.

I met Larry and his wife in 2015 and filed his clemency petition in 2016. While the petition was pending, Larry was selected to be a participant in the CTA’s Second Chance Program, cleaning buses and rail cars. Recently, he completed his second full year in the program.

Earlier this year, shortly before a judge granted his petition to seal his criminal record — made possible by the law Rauner signed — Larry learned that his name has been added to the CTA’s hire list.

Over the years, Larry has learned not to give up on himself. And today, he says at age 51, he feels like a “different man.”

He’s a man of few words, but on the day after the judge granted his petition, he called me to say thanks.

How did he feel?

“Really, really good,” Larry said with a chuckle. “Like I never got in trouble before, though I know I did.”

Ina R. Silvergleid is a Chicago attorney and owner of A Bridge Forward LLC. She specializes in helping people with a criminal background eliminate barriers to employment, professional licensing and housing.


Companies that hire Felons


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Eric Mayo

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Wednesday, May 28, 2014

A Sex Offender needs a Job


A Sex Offender needs a Job


A Sex Offender needs a JobI am a sex offender that even during this crime I never hurt anybody. It was just pictures on the internet. I have been looking for a job for 2 years now and only have been able to find some very very part-time seasonal job. That only gives me enough to pay for my prescriptions and transportation. How can I get a half way decent job.

Sincerely

Daniel



 A Sex Offender needs a Job




A: Hello Daniel,

A convicted sex offender has a difficult time getting hired. I suggest contacting your parole or probation officer. Often they have knowledge of employers who have hired offenders.

A Sex Offender needs a Job
I suggest also contacting your local United Way. The United Way support social agencies that provide services to ex-offenders and felons. Goodwill Industries has a proven record of hiring ex-offenders and felons as well as providing other services . You can get more information here:

http://www.goodwill.org/

Another solution is to apply for temporary employment. Many employers are in need of temporary help. Often temporary employees are hired permanently. Smaller independent agencies are a better choice than larger, nationally known ones. Independent agencies are free to hire anyone they choose and are more likely to hire felons and ex-offenders. Larger agencies often have to comply with the policies of the parent company.

One tactic that I often suggest sex offenders to use is to apply to smaller companies.  Smaller companies are less likely to use background expensive background checks.  On the application, leave the space where the criminal background question blank.  It is a chance the employer may not notice it.  If he does, be prepared to briefly talk about your conviction.

Sex offender jobs may be difficult to find but a little hard work will pay off.

I hope this helps

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



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Sex Offender


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This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

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