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Showing posts with label ex offender jobs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ex offender jobs. Show all posts

Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?

From The North Carolina Dept. of Commerce

The share of former offenders finding work in North Carolina within a year after release from state prison declined from 62% in 1998 to 39% in 2014. This article explores some of the factors that may be responsible for this trend, including changes in the labor market that have made it harder to find a job—particularly for blue-collar workers, and especially for former offenders.

In previous articles, we reported that the employment prospects of ex-offenders improved following the end of the Great Recession as the economy grew and the labor market tightened. However, data from the North Carolina Common Follow-up System (CFS) reveal that the post-release employment rates of former prisoners remain much lower than in the late 1990s—a potentially worrying trend.[1]

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?


This article, while not exhaustive, offers some theories for why the fortunes of former offenders recently released from state prison have worsened since the late 1990s. Job-finding rates have declined among jobseekers in general (not just ex-offenders) in North Carolina and nationwide over the past two decades, reflecting underlying changes in the labor market that have made it more difficult to find work. One change in particular—a slump in goods-producing jobs—may be limiting the types of employment opportunities traditionally available to former offenders. In addition, the widespread practice of pre-employment background checks has placed further impediments to post-release job-finding.

The upshot: regardless of the cause, former state prisoners in North Carolina are experiencing worse employment outcomes now than they did during earlier periods of economic growth. Individuals tasked with helping ex-offenders obtain employment may find it more challenging to serve this population than in previous decades, despite the opportunities afforded by North Carolina’s red-hot labor market.

Before proceeding to our theories, we should first note that the composition of the inmate population has changed over time in ways that may have affected the employment outcomes of former prisoners. For example, North Carolina’s 2011 Justice Reinvestment Act (JRA) redirected misdemeanants from state prisons to county jails, thus increasing the prevalence of felons in the prison population. Prisoners’ education levels have also decreased over time, including prior to the JRA, and as a result they may be finding fewer opportunities for gainful employment after release.[2]

Another possible explanation can be found in labor market trends occurring during this period. It has gotten progressively more difficult for unemployed jobseekers to find work since the late 1990s. The share of unemployment insurance (UI) claimants employed within a year after layoff declined from 89% in 2000 (the earliest year available) to 82% in 2014. Similar trends can be seen in survey data; the percent of unemployed workers in the Current Population Survey finding work the following month declined from 34% in 1998 to 20% in 2014.[3]

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?


These declines in job-finding, which mirror national trends, have occurred alongside “jobless recoveries” that feature persistently slow job growth, high unemployment rates, and pervasive long-term unemployment after the end of each recession. Economists have proposed a wide range of explanations for jobless recoveries, including the widespread slowdown in new business startups, which has cut off an important source of job growth; businesses taking advantage of recessions to streamline their operations; and structural changes in the labor market that have yielded permanent job losses in certain industries. These various forces have, individually or combined, helped create a less hospitable labor market for all jobseekers—not just former offenders.

The concentration of job losses in certain sectors—particularly “blue collar” industries—provides an additional clue in explaining the worsening employment outcomes of ex-offenders. North Carolina has followed the rest of the nation in seeing declining levels of employment in goods-producing sectors, particularly in Manufacturing and Construction. The Construction sector experienced steep job losses after the Great Recession, while Manufacturing employment fell continuously from the late 1990s through 2010. Our state had nearly 350,000 fewer Manufacturing jobs and 36,000 fewer Construction jobs in 2014 than it did in 1998.

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?


Indeed, most of the decline in ex-offenders’ employment rates can be accounted for by fewer finding work in Manufacturing and Construction. These sectors employ a disproportionate share of former offenders; in 1998, 12% of former offenders were primarily employed in Manufacturing within a year after release, while 11% were employed in Construction.[4] By 2014, the share primarily employed in Manufacturing and Construction had fallen to 6% and 4%, respectively. Employment in these two sectors fell by 13 percentage points, accounting for most of the 23-percentage point decrease in former offenders’ employment rates. 

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?



Finally, we note that employer hiring practices may have made it more difficult for former offenders to find work. The vast majority of employers now conduct criminal background checks on job candidates, a trend driven in part by post-September 11th security concerns and the greater availability of inexpensive background checks. The increased prevalence of background checks makes it more difficult for otherwise-qualified former offenders, particularly felons, to obtain employment; academic studies have found that employers are less likely to consider job applicants with criminal records. Among North Carolina employers surveyed by LEAD in 2018 who reported difficulty hiring, 23% reported that applicants’ criminal records were a reason for their hiring challenges. 

General disclaimers:

Data sources cited in this article are derived from surveys and administrative records and are subject to sampling and non-sampling error. Any mistakes in data management, analysis, or presentation are the author’s.


[1] The earliest data available in the Common Follow-up System for state prisoners covers the year 1997, and the latest data covers the year 2014. We calculate wages in the year after release from state prison, and treat any wage-earning during this year as an indication of employment. Around 3% of released prisoners are released from more than one period of incarceration in a given year; for these persons, we include only the last release of each year. Wage data in the CFS are based on state unemployment insurance (UI) tax records from employers, and thus may omit earnings from federal government employment, self-employment, “under-the-table” jobs, and other work not covered by state UI laws.

[2] In 2010, only 28% of exiting prisoners had completed the 12th grade or higher, compared to 43% in 1998. Source: NC Department of Public Safety, Automated System Query

[3] We use longitudinally-linked Current Population Survey microdata from IPUMS-CPS, University of Minnesota, www.ipums.org

[4] Here we define “primary employment” as the sector in which a worker earned the most wages in each year. In 1998, 37% of employed former offenders primarily worked in Manufacturing and Construction within a year after release, compared to 23% of all workers in the state.


Companies that hire felons


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Eric Mayo

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Sunday, September 16, 2018

Former felons deserve a second chance

The Times Herald - Published 3:42 p.m. ET Sept. 11, 2018

Former felons deserve a second chance
One of the things that is Pure Michigan is sending people to prison. Although incarceration rates have fallen the past few years, there are three times as many people in Michigan prisons now than there were four decades ago. If Michigan were a country, it would have one of the top 20 incarceration rates in the world and would likely be on a State Department watch list.

More than six of every 100 Michiganders is in prison. About twice as many are former felons, those who have been released from prison, although many are still repaying a debt to society they no long owe.

It turns out that society needs them. Michigan needs them to get up in the morning and come to work. For many, though, that isn’t possible because one of the first things many employers ask, after name and address on a job application, is whether the applicant has been convicted of a felony.

One of those who would have to answer yes is the voice of those Pure Michigan commercials. Ten years before “Home Improvement” and 18 years before the debut of the state tourism campaign, Tim Allen was paroled from federal prison where he was serving three to seven years after being arrested with almost a pound and a half of cocaine.

Allen found work after his felony convictions.

Other former felons should be given the same chance. Many won’t. Some former felons are reluctant to apply for jobs, knowing they will have to check that box. Many employers won’t look past that blemish on a potential asset’s past history. Either way, applicants don’t get interviewed, employers don’t learn about important and relevant training and experience, well qualified people won’t get jobs and businesses will struggle to fill vital positions.

The felony question isn’t a valid predictor of future performance and should be illegal. In a handful of states and a few cities across the country, it is. A bill to ban it in Michigan never got a committee hearing.

But an executive order of Gov. Rick Snyder, Michigan last week just became one of about three dozen states that doesn’t ask the question of prospective state employees.

The city of Port Huron will no longer ask its applicants if they’ve been convicted of a felony. Beyond being a good business practice, it is part of City Manager James Freed’s campaign to give the city a reputation as a place welcoming to anyone who wants to work.

City Council can’t extend the ban to include other employers in the city, as Austin, Texas, and other cities have done.

That’s because, in March, Snyder signed Senate Bill 353, which prohibits local governments from enacting ordinances that restrict use of the felony question by private employers. Irony is not a crime.

Former felons deserve a second chance



Companies that hire felons

Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


How to get a job with a criminal record

Former felons deserve a second chance


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Eric Mayo

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Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Inmates who learn trades are often blocked from jobs. Now something's being done.

Inmates who learn trades are often blocked from jobs. Now something's being done.
Inmates talk while participating in the barber school program at the Stateville Correctional Center in Crest Hill, Illinois on Feb. 11, 2014.Lathan Goumas / The Herald-News via AP

Half the states bar ex-cons from getting the occupational licenses they need to re-enter the workforce. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle say it doesn't make sense.

by Adam Edelman / NBC News

Mike Grennan, a former convict who's getting by piecing together small construction gigs in Port Huron, Michigan, says he's paid his debt to society — but, when it comes to getting an occupational license to be a home-building contractor, he just can't outrun his criminal past.  That's because Michigan, like two dozen other states, has laws on the books that prevent ex-felons like Grennan from getting the professional licenses they need to work in a variety of blue-collar trades, including cutting hair, welding, doing makeup and cosmetics, construction and more.

"It really frustrates me. I have a really good work ethic, and I've paid my debt to society," said Grennan, 46, who has been in and out of state prison for chunks of his adult life, due to a series of convictions he said stem from an addiction to heroin.


Inmates who learn trades are often blocked from jobs. Now something's being done.
Mike Grennan finds work as a subcontractor for small projects in Port Huron, Mich., but he hasn't been able to get his occupational license to be a homebuilder because of his criminal past.Courtesy Mike Grennan

Now, a growing number of states are trying to bring down the barriers convicts face in re-entering the workforce after their release — and that includes a new raft of laws in recent months that have drawn bipartisan support and are aimed at making it easier for ex-cons to get occupational licenses in fields from which they were formerly barred because of their criminal pasts.

Since his 2013 release from Michigan's Jackson State Prison, where he served a three-year sentence on larceny and stolen property charges, Grennan has been blocked from getting his residential maintenance and alteration contractor's license — which he needs to legally work as a homebuilding/renovation contractor. That's because of "good moral character" clauses in Michigan law that essentially prohibit people with felony convictions from getting approved for more than 70 percent of occupational licenses granted by the state.

More than 70 million Americans with prior criminal records are facing similar barriers to re-entering the workforce, where 25 percent of all jobs require an occupational or professional license, according to the National Employment Law Project, a left-leaning workers rights nonprofit based in New York.
"You're looking at crisis in which a large proportion of the American public are just locked out of all sorts of jobs, which not only hurts them and their families, but creates a challenge for employers, often times in in-demand occupations that are looking for qualified workers," said Maurice Emsellem, NELP’s Fair Chance Program director.

The added irony, Emsellem and other experts said, is that so many others, in similar situations to Grennan, actually learned their trade in prison, where they were preparing to come out ready to find a job and re-enter society — only to find out that they can't.


Inmates who learn trades are often blocked from jobs. Now something's being done.
Inmates training to become commercial underwater divers receive classroom instruction at the California Institution for Men state prison in Chino, California. They are among those who can get the licenses they need to get jobs. Patrick T. Fallon / Bloomberg via Getty Images

"There's a lot training happening in construction and manufacturing inside prisons," Emsellem said. "People go through all this effort to reform themselves. And then they can't work when they get out. It's an extraordinary and powerful irony.”

This year, at least eight states have tried to fix the problem.  In March, Delaware Gov. John Carney, a Democrat, signed into law a measure removing some obstacles for former convicts seeking licenses in cosmetology, barbering, electrology, nail technology and aesthetics. Under the law, state licensing boards can no longer include convictions older than 10 years as part of their consideration process; and the waiting period prospective licensees must observe before applying for a waiver of a prior felony conviction was slashed to three years from five.

Weeks earlier, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb, a Republican, signed a similar bill that eliminated "good moral character" and "moral turpitude" clauses from licensing board requirements and forced boards to limit disqualifying crimes to those "specifically and directly" related to the profession in which the applicant was seeking a license.

Also that month, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts, a Republican, signed bill mandating that occupational licensing boards render their decisions about whether past convictions would be considered disqualifying before applicants spend time and money on training and classes. Previously, applicants had to complete relevant training before even applying for their license.

Similar laws have gone into effect this year in Tennessee, Wyoming, Kansas, Maryland and Massachusetts. And since 2015 — following a set of best practices for state lawmakers published by the Obama White House regarding occupational licensing reform — at least seven other states have put laws on the books lessening licensing restrictions for applicants with criminal histories, according to the Institute for Justice, a libertarian-leaning public interest law firm.

The restrictions were originally enacted to increase public safety by ensuring that licensed tradespeople met high standards, experts said. But states that have maintained such obstacles to re-entering the workforce for former convicts have actually seen public safety harmed, according to a widely cited 2016 study by Arizona State University economics professor Stephen Slivinski, because the laws result in significantly higher rates of criminal recidivism. The study also found that states with fewer restrictions have lower rates of recidivism.

Even as bipartisan support in state capitals across the U.S. for reform is growing, not everyone's on board.  Bill Cobb, who now works as the deputy director for the ACLU's Campaign for Smart Justice, knows all about it.

In 1993, Cobb, then a 24-year-old college student in Philadelphia and a veteran of Operation Desert Storm, pleaded guilty to robbery, criminal conspiracy and kidnapping charges for driving the getaway car in a crime. After he served a six-year sentence at a Pennsylvania state prison, Cobb enrolled in a Philadelphia program that would set him up to get an occupation license for commercial truck driving.

"I took out thousands of dollar in loans, passed all the written exams," Cobb said, "only to find out that that I would not even be able to get a job driving as a result of not being able to get an occupational license."

Cobb later found work as a telemarketer before embarking on an advocacy career to help people who faced a similar predicament coming out of prison. "I did my time. I was ready to move on and live my life well," he said.

Pennsylvania has to date rejected substantial changes in its licensing laws.


Updated List of Companies that Hire Ex-offenders and Felons


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)



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Eric Mayo

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Monday, May 7, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Why Ex-Prisoners Struggle to Successfully Reintegrate into Society

Felon Housing


By Dr. Michael Pittaro, Faculty Member, Criminal Justice at American Military University

Every week, more than 10,000 prisoners are released from America’s state and federal prisons, equating to more than 650,000 ex-prisoners annually reintegrating into society, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. However, recidivism rates are extremely high with approximately two-thirds of ex-prisoners being rearrested within three years of release, according to the Recidivism Center. It’s estimated that nine million offenders return to prison annually.


It’s clear that there’s not enough support to help ex-prisoners stay out of the correctional system. This is just one element sustaining the disproportionate incarceration of African American males. The likelihood of an African American male being sentenced to prison in his lifetime is one in three, whereas for a Caucasian male it is one in 17, according to The Huffington Post. Similarly, African American females are being sentenced to prison at a far greater rate than Caucasian females.

The criminal justice system needs more resources to improve reintegration efforts and help ex-offenders find adequate jobs and housing so they’re less likely to re-offend. Helping ex-prisoners successfully reintegrate into society will not only reduce costly recidivism rates, but, in many cases, will help break the intergenerational cycle of criminality.

Improving Housing Options for Ex-Prisoners

Most ex-prisoners will return to the same communities they lived and socialized in before their arrest. In many cases, these are neighborhoods that have high rates of poverty and crime, leaving many residents feeling disenfranchised from society with little access to social support programs.

In a prior publication, “Prisoner Reintegration Challenges of Assimilation and Crime Desistance,” I concluded that most ex-prisoners returning to these communities will face uncertainty over their future and animosity from a predominantly unforgiving society, as well as a multitude of personal, social, and legal barriers that prevent them from leading law-abiding lives.

Finding safe and affordable housing is difficult for ex-prisoners who often face limitations on where they can live. Many times, low-income public housing is their only choice. These housing developments are often overrun with drugs, gang violence, and other criminogenic factors. Private housing is often not an option because ex-prisoners are exclusively barred from the private housing market due to the stigma of being an ex-felon.

In some cases, even the public housing market has banned ex-prisoners from renting or leasing an apartment, which can happen if the criminal conviction was drug-related, a sexual offense, or a crime of violence as outlined in the exclusionary policies of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. If ex-prisoners are forced to return to the same destructive environment that contributed to their initial incarceration, they will often submit to the same temptations and reoffend.

Barriers to Employment for Ex-Prisoners

Along with obtaining suitable housing, finding and maintaining employment can greatly improve an ex-prisoner’s odds of leading a crime-free, productive life. However, ex-prisoners face the society-wide stigma of being an ex-convict, which severely limits the number of sustainable job opportunities available to them.

Many employers conduct criminal history checks on prospective employees and reject anyone with a criminal history. In a somewhat dated, yet significant Urban Institute study from 2003, more than 90 percent of employers surveyed were willing to consider filling job vacancies with welfare recipients, while only about 40 percent were willing to consider hiring an ex-prisoner.

Companies in the retail and service sector that require contact with customers are among the most unlikely to consider hiring a convict. Employer reluctance is greatest when the offense in question was a violent one and least when it was a nonviolent drug offense.

Many ex-prisoners are limited to working inconsistent, low-wage jobs – such as in construction or manufacturing – that make it incredibly difficult to support themselves and their families. In addition, ex-prisoners are often mandated to pay further penalties including parole supervision fees, court costs, restitution, child support, drug-testing fees, counseling fees, and more.

To complicate matters further, finding employment opportunities can be especially challenging because many offenders have limited work histories. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, more than one third of all prisoners were unemployed at the time of arrest.

Educational Obstacles to Finding Employment

The National Reentry Resource Center concluded that only about half of incarcerated adults have a high school degree or its equivalent, compared with 85 percent of the adult population. In Prisoner Reintegration Challenges of Assimilation and Crime Desistance, I noted that most ex-prisoners do not have viable, marketable job skills, or sufficient literacy to obtain gainful employment.

To compound matters, many prisoners have a learning disability. According to Joan Petersilia, 11 percent of prisoners have a documented learning disability compared with only 3 percent of the general adult population.

While there are some educational opportunities available to inmates while they are imprisoned, only one third of all prisoners choose to participate. Educational programming, including specific classes that focus on GED preparation, adult basic education, and learning English as a second language, would collectively improve odds of employment.

There’s no doubt that more must be done to help break down the barriers that hinder ex-prisoners from leading law-abiding and productive lives. Helping them find adequate housing and providing educational opportunities that leads to gainful employment are all critical to successful reintegration and reductions in recidivism. However, ultimate change must come from the offender. The ex-prisoner can break the cycle of criminality only by changing his or her unlawful ways. Ex-prisoners must abstain from crime, substance abuse, and other problematic areas which put themselves at risk. They must also seek out opportunities to improve their situation and put in the work and effort to lead productive and lawful lives.

About the Author: Dr. Michael Pittaro is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice with American Military University and an Adjunct Professor at East Stroudsburg University. Dr. Pittaro is a criminal justice veteran, highly experienced in working with criminal offenders in a variety of institutional and non-institutional settings. Before pursuing a career in higher education, Dr. Pittaro worked in corrections administration; has served as the Executive Director of an outpatient drug and alcohol facility and as Executive Director of a drug and alcohol prevention agency. Dr. Pittaro has been teaching at the university level (online and on-campus) for the past 15 years while also serving internationally as an author, editor, presenter, and subject matter expert. Dr. Pittaro holds a BS in Criminal Justice; an MPA in Public Administration; and a PhD in criminal justice. To contact the author, please email IPSauthor@apus.edu. For more articles featuring insight from industry experts, subscribe to In Public Safety’s bi-monthly newsletter.




Companies that hire felons





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Jobs for Felons: Why Ex-Prisoners Struggle to Successfully Reintegrate into Society




Eric Mayo

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Monday, February 5, 2018

Jobs for Felons: San Francisco to Wipe Away Decades of Marijuana Convictions

Jobs for felons: San Francisco to Wipe Away Decades of Marijuana Convictions



 San Francisco to Wipe Away Decades of Marijuana Convictions
By Zusha Elinson, Wall Street Journal
Biography@ZushaElinson
zusha.elinson@wsj.com

SAN FRANCISCO—Thousands of people convicted of marijuana offenses in this city going back to 1975 will have their convictions dismissed or reduced, San Francisco’s district attorney announced Wednesday.





It marks one of the most aggressive moves to wipe away old convictions in the face of new laws legalizing marijuana in California and other states.

San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón said that his office would dismiss and seal 3,038 misdemeanor marijuana convictions, and review and possibly resentence 4,940 felonies—all of which were adjudicated before California voters legalized marijuana in 2016.

Under the state legalization measure, Californians can petition the courts to get old marijuana possession and other convictions dismissed. Mr. Gascón  said his office is taking the extra step of doing it for people in order to lift the burden of past convictions that can make it difficult for people to get jobs.

“A criminal conviction can be a barrier to employment, housing and other benefits, so instead of waiting for the community to take action, we’re taking action for the community,” said Mr. Gascón

Nine states and Washington, D.C., have legalized recreational marijuana use, and a debate has arisen over what to do with past pot convictions in these states.

In Nevada, where recreational marijuana was legalized, Gov. Brian Sandoval vetoed a bill last year that would have required certain offenses to be dismissed and sealed. Mr. Sandoval, a Republican, said in his veto message that such issues were better handled on a case-by-case basis.

In Colorado, prosecutors have raised concerns over bills making wiping away old pot convictions easier, said Arnold Hanuman of the Colorado District Attorneys’ Council.

“Many times convictions are plea bargained down from more serious conduct,” said Mr. Hanuman. “Our concern is that the original conduct involved in the incident is oftentimes more egregious.”

More states are including provisions in legalization measures for expunging past convictions, said Chris Lindsey, senior legislative counsel at the Marijuana Policy Project, which advocates for ending pot prohibitions. “This move by San Francisco is remarkable,” said Mr. Lindsey. “It’s not only do we allow people to repair their criminal histories, the local jurisdiction is just going to do it for them.”

Should all marijuana convictions be thrown out when marijuana becomes legal?


Jobs for Felons: San Francisco to Wipe Away Decades of Marijuana Convictions


Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons


Jobs for Felons: San Francisco to Wipe Away Decades of Marijuana Convictions



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Eric Mayo

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Monday, January 8, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market

Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market


BY NILA BALA, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR, the Hill

   Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market
Nearly one out of three Americans has a record in the criminal justice system and, as a result, faces a difficult road to becoming employed. Adding to their woes is the fact that many jobs — including interior designer, barber, pest control applicator and fire alarm installer — require some kind of occupational license.

Unfortunately, many states still deny licenses for individuals with criminal convictions, even when those convictions are decades old or relatively minor. The good news? Several states and cities across the country are poised to become leaders in reforming the law.

The number of jobs requiring occupational licenses has ballooned in the last 50 years. Occupational licensing has expanded from covering five percent of the workforce in the 1950s to 30 percent today. In recent years, occupational licenses have come under fire for creating unnecessary barriers to work without any measurable gains in safety or quality of services provided to the public.

Counter to what many believe, locking released individuals out of job opportunities is bad policy — it hurts returning citizens, our economy and public safety. Employment upon release is one of the key indicators in predicting whether individuals will commit another crime, and the sooner ex-offenders are employed, the less likely they will be to commit future crimes. States that consider license applications from returning citizens are demonstrably safer. In states willing to consider applications from ex-felons, the recidivism rate declined by 4.2 percent; in the 29 states where licensing boards outright reject applications from ex-felons, the recidivism rate actually rose by 9.4 percent.


Other states — such as Georgia, Illinois and Kentucky — have already passed measures to limit the consideration of criminal records in the licensing process. In Illinois, for instance, State Rep. Marcus Evans Jr. sponsored a law last year that forbade the state licensing department from disqualifying potential funeral directors, roofers, barbers, cosmetologists, hair braiders and nail technicians solely because of a criminal conviction — unless the conviction directly relates to the job.

Similarly, the D.C. Committee is currently considering an amendment to permit licensing boards to consider only convictions directly related to the job. The Removing Barriers to Occupational Licenses Amendment Act Of 2017 would also give the returning citizen an opportunity to provide mitigating evidence.

 The current language in D.C. guiding licensing boards is vague, denying any applicant whose offense “bears directly on the fitness of the person to be licensed.” As Councilman Charles Allen, one of the sponsors of the bill, pointed out at the Nov. 28 committee hearing that the law provides “no explanation of what fitness means, or how it should be determined.” Society would be better served with a narrowly tailored law that provides clarity to applicants and licensing boards alike.

Not surprisingly, professional associations are uncomfortable with licensing reforms. The Boards of Chiropractic, Medicine, Nursing, Respiratory Care and Dentistry all opposed the D.C. bill. The main argument supplied was that, without a review of an individual’s entire record, public safety would be harmed.

However, the proposed amendment would not prevent licensing boards from considering convictions directly relevant to the occupation in question. None of the professional associations opposed to the bill explained why considering irrelevant information would protect the public.

Additionally, all of the professional associations argued that very few applicants, even those who have had contact with the criminal justice system, are denied licenses. However, many individuals with criminal records do not even apply for licensure because they believe their past conviction is an immediate disqualification. This is why a key component of a law removing barriers to licensing should be education and publication — provisions that are not currently contained in the bill’s language.

The current laws are not conducive to public safety and deny returning citizens the dignity of work — the pride in making a living and providing for their family. Preventing a large swath of individuals from obtaining occupational licenses simply because of prior contact with the criminal justice system is bad policy. Those who have paid their debts to society deserve at least a fighting chance to obtain occupational licenses.

Nila Bala is a senior fellow for criminal justice policy at the R Street Institute, a nonprofit group dedicated to promoting limited government in Washington, D.C.


Jobs for Felons: Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market


Jobs for Felons: Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market


  Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market


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Eric Mayo

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Friday, November 17, 2017

Ex-offenders, Felons, Jobs and Drug Tests

Ex-offenders, Felons, Jobs and Drug Tests

Ex-offenders, Felons, Jobs and Drug TestsI have been helping Ex-offenders and Felons get jobs for many years and I have helped thousands get jobs. One of the biggest barriers that some ex-offenders place in front of themselves is not being able to pass drug tests.


Drug testing has become an important safety issue for many employers. Many companies now have some form of drug testing for prospective employees. Drug testing serves to lower the instance and issues associated with drug abuse in the workplace, including lateness, absenteeism, turnover rate, crime, violence, theft and other side effects.  Too many of my students believe  that they can use illegal drugs and still pass drug tests. With my experience in human resources, management and employment training, I will attempt to expose the myths and give the facts on drug tests.

The typical methods that employers use for detecting illegal drugs are:

Urine Testing:

Urine testing is the most common of the screenings used for illegal substances. Drug users would sometimes use outlandish methods like using fake urine that is sold in some places or using a sample taken from someone else in place of their own. To avoid the applicant using urine not his own, I would always have a sample given in the presence of a staff member. Others believe that drinking large amounts of water will dilute the sample and the drugs will not be detected. Water passes through the body much too quickly to be effective. I have even heard of using ridiculous home remedies to beat urine tests. These remedies include aspirin, eye drops, ammonia, vinegar, bleach and even commercial drain cleaners! There are commercial products that claim to mask the traces of drugs making them undetectable.  many of these products use nitrates which will mask the drug to an extent, but laboratories have gotten more savvy and also test for the nitrate compounds that these products contain. In many cases the presence of nitrates will result in a failed test.


A single use of marijuana can be detected up to seven days in the urine, while extended use can be detected up to 100 days

Amphetimines, cocaine, heroin, opiates and PCP can be detected accurately up to seven days after use.



Ex-offenders, Felons, Jobs and Drug Tests



Saliva Testing

Saliva tests are the least popular because it can only detect toxins used three or four days prior. Saliva tests can detect fresh elements of alcohol and drugs in the mouth.

Hair follicle Testing

My experience is that hair follicle testing is the most effective method of narcotics screening.  A hair test is an examination that uses a small sample of hair to identify specific drugs used by the person being tested. Typically, the sample is taken from the head, but can be collected from several other body locations such as arms, legs and back and may be combined to obtain the required amount of hair.  Drugs can be detected with high accuracy for a six month period after use. Chemical compounds of drugs are circulated in the blood stream and become part of the cells of the body including the hair root where they are easily detected.

There are hundreds of detoxifying products on the market that claim that with their use, drugs will not be able to be detected. There products that claim that they can wash toxins out of the hair. Most of these are absolute scams. The rest have a very low success rate. An experienced screener would pull the hair out intact, exposing the root where the compounds collect.

A one time use of marijuana will likely not show up in the hair while extended use can be detected for three to five months after use depending on the test used.


Amphetamines, cocaine, heroin, opiates and PCP can be detected accurately up to five months after use.

Certain non-prescription medications can interfere with accurate results. These common medications include ibuprofen and ephedrine-based products. Most drug testing companies will ask the applicant in advance if they have taken any prescription or non-prescription medication prior to the screen.

In most cases if any drugs are detected, the applicant will have the opportunity to provide a doctor's prescription or choose to be retested.


Jobs for felons and "ex-offenders" are hard enough to get, so why blow an opportunity to get hired by using
drugs?


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The facts about employee drug testing for ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs

Jobs for Felons: Hair Test, Saliva Test, Urine Test, Substance 

Jobs for Felons: How Drug Test Cheats get Caught


 

 Companies that Hire Felons

 
Ex-offenders, Felons, Jobs and Drug Tests

Ex-offenders, Felons, Jobs and Drug Tests



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Drug Tests

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Monday, August 28, 2017

Felon has a job and needs a Federal Bond

Felon has a job and needs a Federal Bond


Felon has a job and needs a Federal Bond
Hello please allow me to introduce myself, my name is Eric, a resident here in the city of Las Vegas, I am a certified Heating Ventilation & Air Conditioning Technician (HVAC), I was just hired for another HVAC Company here in Las Vegas, and is fearing that I may be laid off once again due to my background of being a felon, in the past I have been hired for several HVAC company on the spot, but after they receive my background report I am immediately let go due to reasons of having a negative past.

With this new job that I have just been hired on they have just received my background report back and had the employment agency send me a copy allowing me to know that they know that I am a felon, now I'm afraid of being removed once again, this is why I am now coming to this organization trying to seek some assistance toward trying to obtain some kind of bond to help me to secure my job, can you help me, before I am let go.

This issue is so very important to me and my life of trying to stay employed and earn a living for my family.



 

Felon has a job and needs a Federal Bond




Hello Eric,

Either you or your employer can apply for the federal bond.   
For you to apply, you must have the application form.

You can find it here: Fidelity Bond Certification Form


Take the completed form to your local One-stop Career Center. Ask for the person that handles requests for federal Bonding. That person will be able to explain the bonding process in further detail.

The One-stop Career Centers in your area can be found here:

http://www.servicelocator.org

Ex-offenders and felons can take advantage of federal programs to get jobs.

I hope this helps.

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Everything You Need To Know About The Federal Bonding Program

Felon has a job and needs a Federal Bond


 

Jobs for Felons:  What is the Federal Bonding Program?


Jobs for Felons: How to Get a Federal Bond


Felon has a job and needs a Federal Bond

Felon has a job and needs a Federal Bond

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!


 Felon has a job and needs a Federal Bond


 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Federal Bonding Program

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Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

 Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?


 Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

Local mechanic donates auto shop to help train ex-offenders

I am a felon with four burglary charges on my record, two class 2 felonies, and 2 class 3.  I live in the southwest and have been out of prison for almost 2 yrs.  I am on probation for another year.

I was convicted in May of 2011.  Since I have been out, I have attended and graduated from a. automotive institute with a diploma in diesel mechanic. I graduated almost 3 months ago and can't get a company to call me back or even give me a chance.  Even my school does not give me job leads like they have all of the guys I graduated with.  I'm sure it is because of my record.

I just want to ask you a question. With my record do you think any companies with good benefits ever give me a chance?  I feel like I have wasted my time and the last year of my life attending school.

If you have any advice, I would appreciate it.

Thank you, sincerely,


Bobby

 Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

 

Hello Bobby,

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?It seems that you are waiting for a job to come to you.  That probably won't happen.  I tell all of my students that finding a job is hard work.  Finding a job with a criminal record is harder work.  Ex-offenders and felons face tougher challenges the job seekers without records. 

One option would be to contact trucking companies in your area to see if they service their own trucks.  Because you don't have much hands-on experience you should apply as a mechanic's helper.  This means starting at the bottom, but you will gain valuable experience working with veteran mechanics. Often when you want something it means paying some dues.  Try applying at smaller independent companies.   This will also work at garages that service diesel trucks.  You can get a list of trucking companies and garages in your area from your local phone directory.  Another option is applying to national automotive service chains such as Pep Boys also as a helper.  In both cases I suggest you be totally honest about your past if questioned.

You may also find lists of open positions in your area at your local One-stop Career Center.  The center will also have other resources that can prepare you for a successful job search such as resume writing and interview preparation.  You can find your local One-stop Career Center at the link below.

http://www.servicelocator.org

Best of luck to you 


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Eric Mayo

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

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Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get Jobs

Federal Bonding Program helps felons get jobs



Federal Bonding Program helps felons get jobs
Promoting Opportunity
Employers might have concerns about certain job applicants and perhaps hesitant to hire them because they have criminal records, little or no work backgrounds or recovering alcohol or drug addicts. Some employers are reluctant to hire ex-offenders or felons because they feel their backgrounds make them more probable to steal, commit fraud or be dishonorable in other ways. Many felons are not able to be bonded. A bond is an insurance policy issued by an agency that protects an employer against money or property loss due to employee dishonesty. Certain criminal convictions make many felons unqualified for private bonding. Felons, including anyone with a record of arrest, conviction or imprisonment, and anyone who has ever been on probation or parole, are considered "at-risk" job applicants.

Federal Bonding Program is sponsored by the Department of Labor. Bonds are issued for those who are unable to be bonded privately. The bonds are issued at no cost to the employer and could be an incentive to hire an applicant. Criminal records become less of a concern to employers if they are assured that they are protected from loss of money or property due to theft.

Bond issuance applies to any job at any employer in any state, and covers any employee dishonesty committed on or away from the employer’s actual job location. Any full or part-time employee paid wages (with Federal taxes automatically withheld) can be bonded, including persons hired by temporary employment agencies. Unfortunately, self-employed persons cannot be covered by these Fidelity Bonds. Fidelity bonds can help felons get jobs and can also be issued to cover already employed workers who need bonding to prevent being laid off or to secure transfer or promotion to a different job at their company.

An applicant can be bonded the same day the job offer is made.

You can find more information about the program by contacting the addresses below:

Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get JobsFederal Bonding Program, ETA/DOL
1725 De Sales Street, NW Suite 700
Washington, DC 20036
1 (800) 233-2258

Federal Bonding Program
P.O. Box 293535
Lewisville, TX 750229
1 (888) 266-3562

You can also get information on the internet at

http://www.bonds4jobs.com/state-coordinators.html

Jobs for felons will be easier to get with a little help from programs like this.


 Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get Jobs


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Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get Jobs
 


Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get Jobs
This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

 

Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get Jobs


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Federal Bonding Program

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Monday, August 8, 2016

Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview
Hello Sir,

I have a job interview next week and I am very nervous about it.  I have an interview for a job as a clerk in a title office.  I have done this kind of work before but not since my legal troubles.  I was involved with a guy who was selling drugs.  There were some in my apartment when he was arrested.  Because the lease was in my name, I was charged with possession. I wasn't selling but I was charged anyway.  I know this will come up on a background check.  

Do you think I have a chance to get this job?

Candy


  Felon is Nervous about Job Interview


Hi Candy,

You don't know how often I hear stories like this.  Too many people get dragged down by people around them and often there are lasting effects.  I'm not going into a lecture about choosing better friends, but you knew he was selling, and there are certain risks involved associating with people and their criminal activities.

Hopefully you were honest on your application and you got an interview anyway.  If that is the case,
 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview
somewhere in the interview, the question is going to come up. You can handle it in three steps.

Own your Mistake - Never blame anyone else for your mistake.  Acknowledge your role in your troubles.  You could start by saying something like this, "I'm glad you asked me that because I want you to feel comfortable about hiring me. I’ll be honest with you because you have the right to know.  I have been in trouble but it didn’t have anything to do with any of my previous employers.  I was involved with someone who was into some bad things and I was arrested along with him.  I am proud to say that I have put that all behind me.

Focus on the Positive - Shift the conversation away from your problem and on to the things you have done to improve yourself and how you now only associate with people who are doing positive things.  Talk about what you have learned through this bad experience.

Talk about your Goals - Without being specific, tell the interviewer that you have goals and this job will help you put your mistake behind you.

Sell your Skills - Talk about your skills, training, education and how they make you an ideal candidate for the job.

Don't forget to be personable and friendly.  Get the interviewer to focus on your skills and personality instead of the fact that have a criminal record.  Stick to the formula above and you will do well.  Remind the interviewer that you can be bonded.  Get information about the Federal Bonding Program and how it can help felons get jobs here:

The Federal Bonding Program

There also may be financial benefits to employers that may also be a selling point.  The Work Opportunity Tax Credit offers tax incentives to employers who hire felons under certain conditions.  You can find out more about it here:


Best of luck to you!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal record


Jobs for Felons: 12 Job Interview Tips




Eric Mayo


 

Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons Make

http://www.jailtojob.com/companies-hire-felons.html

  Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

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