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Showing posts with label ex offender jobs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ex offender jobs. Show all posts

Wednesday, October 19, 2016

Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get Jobs

Federal Bonding Program helps felons get jobs



Federal Bonding Program helps felons get jobs
Promoting Opportunity
Employers might have concerns about certain job applicants and perhaps hesitant to hire them because they have criminal records, little or no work backgrounds or recovering alcohol or drug addicts. Some employers are reluctant to hire ex-offenders or felons because they feel their backgrounds make them more probable to steal, commit fraud or be dishonorable in other ways. Many felons are not able to be bonded. A bond is an insurance policy issued by an agency that protects an employer against money or property loss due to employee dishonesty. Certain criminal convictions make many felons unqualified for private bonding. Felons, including anyone with a record of arrest, conviction or imprisonment, and anyone who has ever been on probation or parole, are considered "at-risk" job applicants.

Federal Bonding Program is sponsored by the Department of Labor. Bonds are issued for those who are unable to be bonded privately. The bonds are issued at no cost to the employer and could be an incentive to hire an applicant. Criminal records become less of a concern to employers if they are assured that they are protected from loss of money or property due to theft.

Bond issuance applies to any job at any employer in any state, and covers any employee dishonesty committed on or away from the employer’s actual job location. Any full or part-time employee paid wages (with Federal taxes automatically withheld) can be bonded, including persons hired by temporary employment agencies. Unfortunately, self-employed persons cannot be covered by these Fidelity Bonds. Fidelity bonds can help felons get jobs and can also be issued to cover already employed workers who need bonding to prevent being laid off or to secure transfer or promotion to a different job at their company.

An applicant can be bonded the same day the job offer is made.

You can find more information about the program by contacting the addresses below:

Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get JobsFederal Bonding Program, ETA/DOL
1725 De Sales Street, NW Suite 700
Washington, DC 20036
1 (800) 233-2258

Federal Bonding Program
P.O. Box 293535
Lewisville, TX 750229
1 (888) 266-3562

You can also get information on the internet at

http://www.bonds4jobs.com/state-coordinators.html

Jobs for felons will be easier to get with a little help from programs like this.


 Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get Jobs


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Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get Jobs
 


Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get Jobs
This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

 

Federal Bonding Program helps Felons get Jobs


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Federal Bonding Program

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Monday, August 8, 2016

Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview
Hello Sir,

I have a job interview next week and I am very nervous about it.  I have an interview for a job as a clerk in a title office.  I have done this kind of work before but not since my legal troubles.  I was involved with a guy who was selling drugs.  There were some in my apartment when he was arrested.  Because the lease was in my name, I was charged with possession. I wasn't selling but I was charged anyway.  I know this will come up on a background check.  

Do you think I have a chance to get this job?

Candy


  Felon is Nervous about Job Interview


Hi Candy,

You don't know how often I hear stories like this.  Too many people get dragged down by people around them and often there are lasting effects.  I'm not going into a lecture about choosing better friends, but you knew he was selling, and there are certain risks involved associating with people and their criminal activities.

Hopefully you were honest on your application and you got an interview anyway.  If that is the case,
 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview
somewhere in the interview, the question is going to come up. You can handle it in three steps.

Own your Mistake - Never blame anyone else for your mistake.  Acknowledge your role in your troubles.  You could start by saying something like this, "I'm glad you asked me that because I want you to feel comfortable about hiring me. I’ll be honest with you because you have the right to know.  I have been in trouble but it didn’t have anything to do with any of my previous employers.  I was involved with someone who was into some bad things and I was arrested along with him.  I am proud to say that I have put that all behind me.

Focus on the Positive - Shift the conversation away from your problem and on to the things you have done to improve yourself and how you now only associate with people who are doing positive things.  Talk about what you have learned through this bad experience.

Talk about your Goals - Without being specific, tell the interviewer that you have goals and this job will help you put your mistake behind you.

Sell your Skills - Talk about your skills, training, education and how they make you an ideal candidate for the job.

Don't forget to be personable and friendly.  Get the interviewer to focus on your skills and personality instead of the fact that have a criminal record.  Stick to the formula above and you will do well.  Remind the interviewer that you can be bonded.  Get information about the Federal Bonding Program and how it can help felons get jobs here:

The Federal Bonding Program

There also may be financial benefits to employers that may also be a selling point.  The Work Opportunity Tax Credit offers tax incentives to employers who hire felons under certain conditions.  You can find out more about it here:


Best of luck to you!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal record


Jobs for Felons: 12 Job Interview Tips




Eric Mayo


 

Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons Make

http://www.jailtojob.com/companies-hire-felons.html

  Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

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Wednesday, July 27, 2016

Withheld Adjudication Keeping Ex-offender from Getting Jobs

Withheld Adjudication Keeping Ex-offender from Getting Jobs



Withheld Adjudication Keeping Ex-offender from Getting JobsHello Eric,

I have an adjudication withheld/felony/battery from over ten years ago. I was never convicted and released from probation two years early for good behavior. I have payed my dues; court fees,anger management,community service and probation. Regardless if I admit to my background or not , I still can not find work, I have been turned down by big corporations like Walmart, and pending on my background from Home Depot. I can not work with children or elderly and had to drop out of nursing school. Now wanting to be a Vet Assistant because I love animals and a state license is not required; hoping this dream career is not crushed as well. Please help me get through this nightmare. It is my past not my present nor my future. I only defended my life, and could not afford a real attorney. Faced five years in prison if I was found guilty at my trial so I took a plea in my best interest not having a trial but now realizing it was in my worst interest. No matter how many years go by.

GT



Withheld Adjudication Keeping Ex-offender from Getting Jobs



Hello GT,

I believe you took the correct path with Withheld Adjudication.  There is absolutely no need for an expensive trial which you may have lost and got an awful conviction on your record and also be out of a lot of money.  This way you have no conviction on your record.
 Withheld Adjudication Keeping Ex-offender from Getting Jobs
It seems that you are getting in your own way a bit.  Let's start with applications. Employers are rarely interested in charges, just convictions.  Typically, applications ask "Have you ever been convicted of a crime...."  Since you have not been convicted, you should NEVER list it on an application if the application asks for convictions.  The answer is "NO."

Let's get clear about Withheld Adjudication.  Withheld adjudication / deferred judgement/deferred adjudication generally relates to a determination by a judge to place a person on probation without a judgement of guilt. There will be terms set by the court, usually a fine and a period of probation. Once the conditions are fulfilled, the charges are normally dismissed.  Since your charges were dismissed you should NEVER list it.  Now, if an application asks for charges, you can list it and note that the charge has been dismissed.  Please, please. please don't take my word for this.  This is simply general information.  You should get clarification from the prosecutor associated with this case to be absolutely sure. As I tell every ex-offender and felon I work with, never offer information that is not asked for and it will make your job search a lot easier

I hope this helps you feel more confident when applying for jobs


Jobs for Felons: What is Withheld Adjudication?




Jobs for felons: The difference between deferred adjudication and probation





Withheld Adjudication Keeping Ex-offender from Getting Jobs


 Withheld Adjudication Keeping Ex-offender from Getting Jobs

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Monday, August 3, 2015

Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use

Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use



Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use
Ex-offenders and felons have a very tough time finding jobs and even getting interviews.  That's no secret, so when an interview finally comes, they should put themselves in the best possible position to get hired.  While we all know that the applicant wants the job, the interviewer has a responsibility to hire the best person available.

In my career that spans more than thirty years, I have have seen and used a number of tricks that interviewers use to get through all of the rehearsing and other things applicants use to put themselves in the best light.  These tricks are used to make applicants reveal who the really are.  Often these tricks go unnoticed. I am going to share with you my all time favorite interviewer tricks.

1.  The Waiting Game - I have seen applicants been made to wait up to an hour to be interviewed.  What I have learned is that the longer people wait, the more they become themselves.  The combination of nerves and aggravation will reveal true personalities.  Whether it is using bad language, complaining, or engaging in inappropriate conversation, this is a true test.  I have even seen applicants flirt with the receptionist, employees and other applicants thus exposing parts of their character.  No matter how long you have to wait, stay professional at all times.

2.  Just One of the Guys - Some interviewers will present themselves as really friendly types that throw formality out of the window.  This often will make the applicant relax (sometimes too much,) which causes them to let their guards down.  When guards come down, things slip out.  I teach my students never to reveal too much information especially about their criminal backgrounds or other errors in judgement.  Never offer information that isn't asked. The interview is not the place to tell your life story or talk about all of mistakes you have made in your life.  Never talk about personal problems, habits, or relationships issues.  Be personable but never tell more than anyone needs to know.  Never talk about to religion, politics, or sex.  Even If the interviewer brings them subjects up, these are not discussions you want to get into.  Never, ever use slang or profanity.

3.  The Big Squeeze -  This neat little trick I use to when I ask applicants into my office. I stand partially in the doorway, forcing the other person turn sideways to squeeze by.  In the few seconds it takes to squeeze by, I get a lot of information.  I can get a hint about the individual's personal hygiene, if they have smoked recently or even taken a drink.  Many employers shy away from hiring smokers.  Smokers require more breaks than non-smokers.  Smokers have more health problems than non-smokers.  If you do smoke, do not smoke before your interview.  If you have alcohol on your breath, forget it!

4.  Hold up! Don't sit down! -  To many people, respect and manners count for a lot and some interviewers will test this a number of ways.  My favorite is sitting down and waiting to see what the applicant does.  My office is like my house.  If he sits down without being invited, it may be because he lacks social graces or he is simply disrespectful.  When you get to the interview area, always wait until the interviewer asks you to be seated.  If he doesn’t offer, politely ask “May I sit?”  Never touch the interviewer’s desk or put anything on it.

5.  Butter Fingers -  Another one of my favorite personality revealers is very subtle but it tells a lot.  I may drop a pen or other small object.  If the applicant picks it up, more than likely, the person is a caring, helpful individual.  If he doesn't, it usually means he cares only about himself.


 Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons make 



The next five are not really tricks, but they are clever ways  interviewers weed out applicants with questions.

6.   Have you Done Your Homework? -  Often interviewers ask "What do you know about our company?"  Interviewers ask this because they want to know if you are serious about working with them. If you haven't prepared for the interview by doing some research on the company, it will show.


It would appear that you are very interested in the job just by doing some research.  Some things you should find out:

How old is the company.

Number of locations

Number of employees

What the company business

Who is the competition?

If it is a large company, you may find this information on the internet or the library.  If you are interviewing with a small local business, you may get the information from the receptionist if you call.



7.  Money, Money, Money -  "How much money are you looking for?"  This is a tricky question that is used to disqualify applicants.  It's tricky because if you give a dollar amount that is too low, you may be paid less than others doing the same job.  If you give an amount that is too high, you may disqualify yourself.  I teach my students to never talk about money until someone offers them a job.  So, the response may be "Are you offering me this job?"  Whether the answer is yes or no, the response should be something like this, "I want to be paid fairly.  I know you will make me a fair offer."    If that answer is not enough, remember no dollar amounts, you should answer, "I want as much as you can afford to pay me."

8.  I'm Feeling Weak - We all have gotten the question, "What is your greatest strength?" and we pretty much know how to handle that one.  People have a a lot of trouble with the follow question which is sure to follow- "What is your biggest weakness?"  Most people blow that one because they forget that the interview is used to sell yourself.  With that in mind, do you think I would be foolish enough to tell you about a real fault of mine that might cost me the opportunity to get a job?  Interviewers count on it!  Every has weaknesses, but don't not tell the interviewer anything that can be used against you.  There are two ways to handle this.  You can present a strength you have as a weakness or you can offer a technical weakness as long as it has nothing to do with the job.  You might say "I get really upset at myself when I don't finish everything on time." It looks like a weakness, but it come across really well because it tells how important it is for you to finish thing promptly.   The second option is to offer a technical weakness (as long as it has nothing to do with the job."  It may sound like this, "I want to brush up on my writing skills.  I write ok, but I want to get better."

9.  Bossy, Bossy - This question is used to spot a troublemaker and it works every time, "Tell me about the worst boss you've ever had?" Under no circumstances should you ever say anything negative about any past job or supervisor.  To an interviewer, only a troublemaker would speak ill of former job or company. In the mind of the interviewer, you were a problem.  That's why you are no longer there.   It's ok to quit a job or even get fired and there are positive ways to explain even a not so great situation.  You might say something like.  "I have had bosses, some better than others.  I have learned something from all of them even if it is what not to do."

10. I have a Question - The final one is a question that is not tricky at all, but an interviewer can find out a lot about what on an applicant's mind with it.    "Do you have any questions for me?"  I am amazed how often applicants answer "no" to this question.  By answering "no" job searchers pass up a golden opportunity to finish off on an extremely high note.  Some really great questions are:



Why is this position open?

What are the day to day duties of this position?

 hat are some of the more difficult problems one would have to face in this job?

What are the opportunities for advancement?

Did you know I can be bonded?  (Federal Bonding Program)

By asking questions like these the interviewer will get the impression that you are interested in more than just a paycheck, which looks really good.


Ex-offenders and felons have a tough time getting interviews so when they come, they have to make them count.  These are some clever tricks that a seasoned interviewer would use to find out more about the person sitting in front of them than what they are saying.  Now you will recognize them when you encounter them and make them work to your advantage!

Best of luck on your interview!


Jobs for Felons: Dirty Little Tricks Interviewers Use




  Jobs for Felons: Preparing to ace the Interview

Jobs for ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs : What to wear to the interview






Please Rate This Post at the Top!


Are you an ex-offender or felon who has a question about finding a job with a criminal record?  I have been helping ex-offenders and felons get jobs for over ten years and I feel I have an understanding of what works. I will be updating this blog often. I will answer specific questions relating to getting a job with a criminal record on this blog so feel free to send me your questions.   The right information could help felons get jobs.  You could have your question answered right here. Email your question to: BelievePublications@comcast.net.


If you are a felon and really serious about getting a job or you want to help someone you care about get a job, check out this link: From Jail to a Job 




Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use


Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use

Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use

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Sunday, July 26, 2015

Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record

 Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record


http://www.howfelonscangetjobs.com
Hello Eric,

My name is Steve.  I am 24 years old.  In 2009 I committed a crime consisting of Vandalism, Burglary, and Arson. I had never been in trouble my entire life and grew up in a strict household.  I was with five other guys and I was the oldest.  I was the only one to turn myself in and give a full statement on the matter. It landed me on a four year probation term and after that, it will be expunged from my record. (THAT WAS THE PLEA AGREEMENT). It happened in Tennessee and now I am currently living in Fort Wayne, IN.

There are a lot more jobs up here than down there but the problem I am facing is that when I go to a temp agency that IS SUPPOSED TO HELP FELONS FIND WORK they tell me that my current felonies together seen on paper would make it really hard for a potential client to take interest in my employment. I DONT KNOW WHAT TO DO. I have not been in trouble since my sentencing. I am a proud step father now of three and I have already completed two full years on my probation.



Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record



Hello Steve,

I'm sorry you are having so much trouble.  I meet people everyday that have done some really stupid things when they were younger and are still paying the price as they get older.  My advice to them is to apply, apply apply for as many jobs as they feel They are qualified for.  I tell felons looking for jobs that finding a job is a numbers game.  The more jobs you apply for, the more interviews you will get.  The more interviews you get, the greater the chance you will find an employer who will give you a shot a job.  Felons get hired everyday.  It's all about finding job leads and applying.

When you get an interview and the question about your record comes up, acknowledge that you made some mistakes when you were younger.  Don't spend a lot of time talking about the mistakes, but focus on the things you have done to improve yourself and your attitude since.  You may say something like this:

I was into some things when I was younger that landed me in jail.  Jail is a tough place to be but I made the best of a bad situation.  I had a job which taught me respect for authority and patience through hard work.  I can honestly say, today I am a different person than I was going in.  If you give me this opportunity I’ll make the most of it.



As far as applying to temporary agencies, you may have more success applying to small privately owned agencies rather than large national companies.  Smaller businesses in general are more flexible when it comes to hiring felonsUse the state sponsored employment service.  Each state has a network of offices that assists individuals in finding jobs.  They also provide a long list of services that help you get a job or find a career.  Some services are, resume preparation, and interviewing skills.  There lists of open jobs in your area. Each offices has trained counselors that can provide individualized assistance.  Many of the counselors have experience helping ex-offenders and felons get jobs.  You can find the nearest office in any community at:

www.servicelocator.org
Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record




WorkOne Northeast Indiana- Allen County
201 East Rudisill Boulevard
Fort Wayne, IN 46806-1756
 


Eric Mayo



Find more info here!

 

Jobs for felons: Ten Simple Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record  




Jobs for Felons: Know your rights in regard to Criminal Background Checks




Jobs for Felons:  How Employers Look at Criminal Records


Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record



Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record

Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record

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Tuesday, July 21, 2015

Felon in AL looking for job opportunities

Felon in AL looking for job opportunities




I am a felon residing in Birmingham, AL.  I recently completed 1 year of probation and am finished with the whole process.  I recently enrolled in a technical college for Information Technology.  I have researched all that I can, and cannot find out about my prospects in this field.  I have read a few books and my strategy is to stick to startups, small, and medium companies.  I have plans to go into business for myself, but starting off, I will need a job.
Is my strategy sound, or should I pick a more inclusive niche?  My overall goal is to become an application developer (apps for mobile phones, tablets, etc.).
Sincerely,


Jay

Felon in AL looking for job opportunities




Hello Jay,


You are on the right track. Smaller companies are less apt to spend money on expensive background checks.  Ex-offenders and felons looking for professional jobs should always apply for open position by using resumes and well written cover letters.  Using that method, the question of a criminal background may never come up.


In the meantime, make use of your local One-stop Career Center.  Take a look at the video below. When starting your own business there are a few concerns.  You may need health coverage, especially if you have a family.  That's where having a job is helpful at least until your company is turning a profit. 


In Birmingham, The One-stop Career Centers can found at this link:


One-stop Career Centers in Birmingham

 


Where can ex-offenders and convicted felons find jobs

  Felon in AL looking for job opportunities


 

 

 

Felon in AL looking for job opportunities

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Friday, July 3, 2015

Felon in TX with DWI needs a Job

Felon in TX with DWI needs a Job

Felon in TX with DWI needs a Job
Mr. Mayo,

My sister  is a convicted felon for the 2nd time for DWI's.  She lives in Angleton, Tx.  She is a hard worker.  She has mainly done construction throughout her lifetime but she is getting too old to continue this type of work.  She has been to the WorkSource numerous times and she continues to look for employment; but she is getting really discouraged.  I have been online to find a list of company names that hire convicted felons and have now wrote them down.
Is their anything else you can think of that might help her seek gainful employment?

Thanks
 

Felon in TX with DWI needs a Job



I'm sorry your sister is having so much trouble.  The good news is that people with DWI get hired everyday.  It is my experience that people with DWI tend to have more success finding jobs in the retail or hospitality industries.  Employers in these fields want people who will be reliable and punctual. 

Felon in TX with DWI needs a Job
Don't give up on the WorkSource in Texas.  New positions are added everyday.  A counselor can show you how to browse open positions from home if your are not already doing so.
You can sign up to browse open positions here:


The closest center to you is:

 491 This Way
Lake Jackson, TX  77566

One last suggestion, when you find an opening you like, the absolute worst thing you could  is to lie on a job application your charge.  I would just be completely honest and in the interview explain the situation to the employer.

I hope this helps.


 Where can ex-offenders and convicted felons find jobs


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Wednesday, July 30, 2014

Ex offender seeks professional job

Ex offender seeks professional job


Ex offender seeks professional job
Eric,


Here's the situation (a mess in some ways...good in others);

I'm 52 years old, white male, MBA in Finance and MIS, BS in Computer Science and Marketing...worked in Mortgages with Village Bank and Credit Card Decisioning, Billing, and Marketing Websites with The Miller Bank (Star Bank).Village Bank and The Miller Bank/Star Bank both went out of business due to the economy. I've been unemployed for a while, since March 2008...there have been a few jobs thrown in here and there since then but they didn't last (Funeral Sales and Sr. Manager with a consulting firm).

The funeral sales position required me to be licensed in Life, Accident, and Sickness. I was completely honest during the interviews and application concerning past and a recent shoplifting arrest. I cleared the background check and was hired. I was denied a temporary license to sell insurance due to the shoplifting incident. The company fired me...yes, even though I passed their background check and the fact that they own the insurance company. Confusing, but true.

I have 6 children and the financial pressures are mounting. I have the following on my background...
  • A DUI from 1989...I was slapped on the hand with an ARD sentence but the charge was not expunged.
  • In 1992/1993 My boss told me to take home the following...a water cooler, a fax machine, and a word processor because we were getting new equipment. I was arrested for "theft by taking" and "receiving stolen property"...both misdemeanors. I plead guilty because the company wasn't backing down. My ex-boss later married my ex-wife. Still, the charges are on my record.
  • Since I've been in Georgia in 1996...I married a widow and there have been domestic violence arrests but all "nolle prosse".
  • Also since 1996 in GA...In 2007 a shoplifting incident that was handled via a first time offender conviction..."nolle prosse", but not expunged.
  • And last year (2010) in Florida...another shoplifting incident that was handled via a guilty plea in absentia...adjudicated guilty. Since this was not "adjudicated withheld" I am not eligible to have this case expunged...ever. I have completed all probation and restitution requirements (fines and community service).

So...you can see when my background gets pulled there is a ton of things that show for me...all misdemeanors...all ugly.

I'm always honest on my applications and in interviews. With the state of the economy it appears I'm too big a risk...plus I know my age is a factor. So, I'm fighting a sketchy past and an age issue. I feel there is no hope.

But, you mentioned The United Way in your blog. I am a true professional from head to toe. Look as polished as any attorney or CEO during interviews. I know I can be of value to a corporation in some capacity. Do you think The United Way is my best place to start to rebuild myself and get back to work?

I hate to see convicted felons (aka sports stars like Michael Vick) return to society after having served their time and paid full restitution move back into society like nothing occurred. How does the little guy do that?

I'd appreciate any all information you may have for me.

Thank you!

Steve

Ex offender seeks professional job


Hello Steve,

For most ex offenders and felons looking for jobs the United Way is a great place to start. The United Way supports a number of organizations that have contacts to open positions. Perhaps a more polished professional like yourself may be better served by contacting your local S.C.O.R.E (Service Corp of Retire Executives) office. As the name implies, there are retired executives who serve communities in many ways. Perhaps you may find valuable contacts that could help you locate your next opportunity.

Another suggestion I often make ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs is to apply with cover letters and resumes. Often when applicants apply directly to employers this way, the question of a criminal record never comes up.  Take a look at the video below.  It outlines how ex-offenders and felons can use resumes sent with well written cover letters as a way to get interviews.  This will let prospective employers the opportunity to meet the person before meeting the criminal record.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Sending Resumes and Cover letters





I hope this helps.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Ex offender seeks professional job

Ex offender seeks professional job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Ex offender seeks professional job

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Monday, April 28, 2014

College Educated Felon Looking for Jobs

 College Educated Felon Looking for Jobs 

 


College Educated Felon Looking for Jobs
I have been free since Nov 2013, and I have been unable to find a job.  I have two college degrees, and I am treating looking for a job, as work.   Do you have any suggestions for me?

Thank you,

Leslie




 College Educated Felon Looking for Jobs



Hello Leslie,

Unfortunately there are a lot of people out of work including college graduates. This is indeed a tough time to find a job but there are jobs available.  I'm sure you have tried all of the online job search websites such as Indeed.com. Monster.com etc., but don't overlook other options of finding job leads.  When you do find open positions, I suggest to my students to apply using a resume with a well written cover letter tailored to each specific job opening.   Often when felons apply this way, the question of records don't come up.  You should apply for every job you feel you are qualified for.  Forget that you have a criminal record.  Just apply.  If the question of your record ever comes up, start your answer with, "I'm glad you are asking me about this because I want you to feel comfortable about hiring me..........."

I suggest to everyone looking for jobs use the services of your local One-stop Career Center.  In addition to a long list of job preparation services, your local center has lists of open positions in your area.  Be sure to speak to an employment counselor so that you can set up an online account.  In many cases an online account will send you you email alerts when jobs in your chosen field become available.

You can use the link below to locate the One-stop Career Center near you:

http://servicelocator.org

You may even consider temporary employment.  Employment agencies are often looking for skilled office employees for temporary assignments.  Often temporary assignments lead to more permanent positions.  The key to applying for temporary work is to apply to smaller, local agencies rather than large corporate agencies.  Large nation-wide companies often have corporate policies that may prohibit hiring those with criminal records.  Smaller, individually owned agencies are free to hire anyone they wish.  make a list of all the agencies in your area and apply just as you would any other job.

This is a tough time to find jobs but hard work and determination will help you find more opportunities that will lead to more chances to get hired.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Preparing for the Job Search

Jobs for felons: Where Ex-offenders and Felons can find Jobs

Jobs for felons: Where Ex-offenders and Felons can find Jobs


College Educated Felon Looking for Jobs

Jobs for Felons: Five Things that get Ex-offenders and Felons Jobs

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

College Educated Felon Looking for Jobs

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