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Showing posts with label ex-offender job sites. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ex-offender job sites. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start

Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start



Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start
President Trump's State of the Union address highlights that being tough on crime is
perfectly  compatible with wanting individuals with records to find work and become
independent instead of falling into government dependency. 
by , Washington Examiner

In his 2018 State of the Union address, President Trump said that “we will embark on reforming our prisons to help former inmates who have served their time get a second chance.”

This sentiment directly follows what Trump promised during his inaugural address, that “we will get our people off of welfare and back to work.” People coming out of incarceration face two distinct paths—they can either find a job, or they will fall into government dependency. Beyond being the main predictor of whether someone is living in poverty, not having a job is the clearest indicator of how likely someone is to re-offend.

Yet one year after their release from incarceration, between 60 percent and 75 percent of ex-offenders remain unemployed. Rather than promoting rehabilitation and independence, states across the country severely limit the work prospects of ex-offenders through occupational licensing laws.

Most states have little oversight over how licensing agencies can treat those with criminal records, meaning agencies can consider old convictions or convictions that are unrelated to the occupation. Even worse, boards can require that applicants meet vague standards such as having “good character” or not showing “moral turpitude.” These unclear requirements give licensing boards broad discretion to prevent ex-offenders from getting work.

With the devastating opioid crisis leaving tens of thousands of individuals across the country with records, vague standards that allow boards to judge applicants’ character can serve as a major obstacle for those recovering from addiction who are seeking work in licensed occupations. Because work is a core component of recovery and has the largest positive effect of any indicator on overcoming drug addiction, states should be promoting work for these individuals, not adding barriers to recovery.

Given that there are 2.3 million people incarcerated in America—at least 95 percent of whom, or 600,000 people each year, will re-enter the general population at some point—excessive licensing regulations for those with records pose a major problem to people like Texas resident Christopher Owen.

After finding work at a home security company, Owen was denied a fire alarm installer license because of a felony burglary on his record. His offense? He had stolen a $5 pair of socks from a Goodwill drop-off trailer in 2014. This incident happened right after Owen’s home had burned down and his mother had passed away. In a brief period, he had gone from owning his own oil and gas company to being homeless. Yet none of these mitigating circumstances were considered by the Texas Department of Public Safety. A crime of $5 cost Owen a career.

There are countless other stories similar to Owen’s—each more unbelievable than the last. Perhaps the least-defensible example of overreach from licensing authorities can be found in Calvert County, Md., where a misdemeanor or a felony can automatically disqualify someone from working as a licensed fortune-teller. Many of these licensing restrictions have nothing to do with protecting public safety. And paradoxically, research has shown that broad licensing restrictions against ex-offenders endanger the public more than they protect it.

Thankfully, states are acting to lower the barriers faced by those with records. Florida State Sen. Jeff Brandes and State Rep. Scott Plakon (both Republicans) introduced a bill that would allow those in prison to apply for licenses before their release date. The reform also allows those with records to petition licensing boards to ensure that they will be approved before they invest substantial amounts of time completing government-required training. And boards for certain occupations will no longer be able to consider convictions from more than five years ago, which will no doubt help the thousands of people recovering from opioid addictions and related offenses move on from their pasts.

In Nebraska, State Sen. Laura Ebke (a Libertarian) introduced a comprehensive licensing reform bill making clear that criminal histories alone should not disqualify people from work. If this bill becomes law, Nebraska boards will no longer be allowed to consider offenses that are unrelated to safely working in a licensed occupation. This highlights another kind of overreach where licensing boards impose blanket bans, which are occupational bans for any kind of felony or misdemeanor, even when the offense is unrelated to the job. One example of this can be found in Nebraska, where those with any criminal record can be denied a massage therapy license. Similar bills to get rid of blanket bans are moving through the legislatures in Wisconsin, the District of Columbia, and New Hampshire.

President Trump’s State of the Union address highlights that being tough on crime is perfectly compatible with wanting individuals with records to find work and become independent instead of falling into government dependency, whether through welfare or re-incarceration. Work keeps ex-offenders out of poverty, allows them to gain valuable skills and experience, moves them off welfare, and helps them avoid reoffending—those are more than enough reasons for states to give them a chance at a fresh start.

Jared Meyer (@JaredMeyer10) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner's Beltway Confidential blog. He is a senior research fellow at the Foundation for Government Accountability.


Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start



How to get a job with a criminal record




Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Donald Trump | Trump


Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start


Eric Mayo

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Thursday, March 16, 2017

Information to Help Felons get Jobs

Information to Help Felons get Jobs


Can ex-felons get local jobs

Hello Mr. Mayo,

I work with felons in a job center in Ohio and I see what they go through everyday trying to find jobs. I have been to your website and I find it appalling that you want to profit from felons by selling them a book that they need.  You say that you want to help felons but it looks like you are helping yourself.

You should be giving your book away.

Debbie


Information to Help Felons get Jobs



Hello Debbie,

I'm sorry you feel that I'm taking advantage of felons. You believe that I should be giving my book away.  You say that you help felons at a job center.  Do you do it for nothing?  You look for your check on Friday don't you?

Most of the people who purchase my book are not felons, but family or friends who want to help them.  Some them believe that the information in my book might benefit them more than buying them a pack of cigarettes or a drink.  I know that there are people that want to help a friend or a family member that may not have the $17.95 that we are asking for the softcover book, so we offer an ebook at a price that almost anyone can afford.  This ebook can be read on any device and is completely printable. You can check it out here: From Jail to a Job

If you were on my website. you were probably looking for information.  I also have two blogs that I have answered hundreds of questions from ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs.  You can find those blogs here:

How Felons Can Get Jobs

Real Answers for Ex-offenders and Felons Looking for Jobs


That's two blogs with tons of free information to help felons get jobs.  Who knows you may even learn some things from my blogs that you can use to help your clients.

Best of luck to you and your clients Debbie!



Information to Help Felons get Jobs



Information to Help Felons get Jobs


Information to Help Felons get Jobs

 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Job Information for Felons

Eric Mayo

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Sunday, March 27, 2016

I Never Use Indeed To Help Felons Get Jobs

I Never Use Indeed To Help Felons Get Jobs


I Never Use Indeed To Help Felons Get Jobs
I often hear of people using Indeed to look for jobs.  In fact, Indeed says that it gets 140 million unique visitors to its website every month.  Out of that number, I wonder how many real job leads are found there and out of that number, how many people actually get jobs.  When you click on the "apply" links on the Indeed website, what happens?  When you click the "apply" link you are asked for your personal information but I'm not really sure if the application actually reaches the employer.

My experience is that when you sign up with Indeed your email address is sold  and you will get tons of emails from career schools, how to make money at home schemes and other things that have nothing to do with getting jobs.  I never encourage the ex-offenders and felons I work with to use Indeed.  A lot of the job listings are stale and the jobs are no longer there.  I have also seen instances where the job didn't even exist.  For instance, I saw one job listed that I always see in my area here in southern New Jersey.  I mean that I see the same job listed all the time.  It was for a job at a nationwide retailer.  It was one of the companies on my list of companies that hire ex-offenders and felons.  So, I went to the store to talk to the manager, who I have known for years to see if the job was actually open.  The manger told me that he had no openings and that Indeed has had that job posted for months.

I Never Use Indeed To Help Felons Get Jobs


I Never Use Indeed To Help Felons Get JobsCan Indeed be valuable in any way?  I teach my students that if they must use Indeed,  never sign up for their website so they don't get bombarded with a bunch of spam emails.  Secondly search for jobs their area but don't click the links on the Indeed website.  Instead of clicking the link, look up the company on your own.  For example, if Indeed lists a job at XYZ company, don't click the link on Indeed, go directly to the XYZ website.   Once you get there look for the link to the company's own employment section.  It often is at the very bottom in small print and it may say "Employment" or "Careers."  Click on the link.  You will be surprised at what you will find.  You will find all of the actual open positions along with the job descriptions, requirement and how to apply.  If the company is nation-wide the job listings will be listed by geographical location.  You will often find more jobs than are listed on Indeed.

You will find that this will result in more and better job leads.

Best of luck in your job search.  Please feel free to comment on this article.

Eric Mayo

I Never Use Indeed To Help Felons Get Jobs



  Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where Ex-offenders and Felons Can Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal record


I Never Use Indeed To Help Felons Get Jobs

I Never Use Indeed To Help Felons Get Jobs

Read More

Sunday, September 27, 2015

Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance

Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance


 Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance
Mr. Mayo,

In the last several months I have had the opportunity to become intimately aware of the financial, psychological and emotional distress, frustration, fear and decreased self esteem of someone who has re-entered regular population from incarceration and is incapable of finding employment that they can survive on because they have a felony. They may have terrific skill sets that are not being utilized in their communities but instead are relegated to flipping burgers or manual labor positions that they cannot sustain themselves or a family on .  I am heartbroken by the dilemma they find themselves wanting to make that change for the better but the whole system is still stacked against them. Some might say rightfully so since they committed a crime to begin with but should everyone be in jail the rest of their lives even after their actual sentence is complete with no ability to show that they have learned and want to become productive in society?
The particular person I came in contact with is homeless, living in his car that he is always on the verge of losing and unable to find a decent job or find a place to live. There are some  felon friendly apartments but they have a variety of felony types and this gentleman has a young daughter and does not want to have her staying with him in an environment that he is not sure would be safe for her.

It seems to me that the impetus to re- offend or possibly commit a different crime purely out of desperation or resorting to less than moral behavior to get what they need...is great. The impetus to just give up on life is also great. How tragic!  I live in Denver Colorado. I was wondering if you knew of any staffing services, coaching services, etc that are available and focus in this area?   If you have been helping felons in your area for over 10 years can you tell me how you go about finding companies that are willing to give felons a second chance?  Are there any government incentives to businesses that are willing to help give these people a second chance at life?  I want to find out what already exists or maybe try to put some programs together but I don't want to re-invent the wheel and would love any input you could give me.
Are there any nationally recognized programs in this area?

Thank you for your time,

Dana

 Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance

 

Hello Dana,

I'm sorry your friend is having so much trouble.  Unfortunately it is common for returning citizens (ex-offenders, felons,) to have difficulty putting the past behind them.  There are many hurdles to overcome.  Below are some resources in your area that your friend may find helpful.




Turnabout, Inc.

Turnabout, Inc. is a non-profit employment, career, and education services agency that provides access to a fully-stocked computer lab, daily job leads, transportation assistance, subsidized work skills training, and job search assistance to former offenders in the Metro Denver area.


Contact:

Turnabout, Inc.
1630 East 14th Avenue
Denver, CO 80218
(303) 813-0005

Web Site: www.turnabout.org

 
Mile High United Way 

The United Way supports many non-profit organizations.  The United Way may be able to put you in contact with organizations that aid ex-offenders and felons with various services

Contact:

  • Phone: (303) 433-8383
  • Fax: (303) 455-6462
  • 711 Park Ave West
  • Denver, CO 80205
  • - See more at: http://www.unitedwaydenver.org/programs#sthash.XjwvEYa9.dpuf


  • Phone: (303) 433-8383
  • Fax: (303) 455-6462
  • 711 Park Ave West
  • Denver, CO 80205
  • - See more at: http://www.unitedwaydenver.org/programs#sthash.XjwvEYa9.dMile High United Way
    711 Park Ave West
    Denver, CO 80205
    Phone: (303) 433-8383

    Web Site: http://www.unitedwaydenver.org/  


    Colorado Workforce Center

    The Colorado Workforce Center consolidates components of Job Service and Employment and Training services in an attempt to maximize its ability to serve job seekers as well as employers. Centers are held accountable for performance outcomes based on the consumer’s feedback. There is an extensive web site devoted to workforce center information as well as employment services.

    Contact:

    Colorado Department of Labor and Employment
    Tower 11, Suite 400
    1515 Arapahoe Street
    Denver, CO 80202
    303-620-4204 

    Web Site: coworkforce.com/EMP/WFCs.asp


     
    Also check out our  List of Companies that hire Ex-offenders and FelonsIt is quite an extensive list and hopefully it will be helpful.


    Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Exclusive Updated List of Companies that Hire Ex-offenders and Felons

    Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where Ex-offenders and Felons Can Find Jobs


    Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal record




      Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance

     Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance


    Eric Mayo

    Read More