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Showing posts with label ex-offender re-entry. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ex-offender re-entry. Show all posts

Monday, May 7, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Why Ex-Prisoners Struggle to Successfully Reintegrate into Society

Felon Housing


By Dr. Michael Pittaro, Faculty Member, Criminal Justice at American Military University

Every week, more than 10,000 prisoners are released from America’s state and federal prisons, equating to more than 650,000 ex-prisoners annually reintegrating into society, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. However, recidivism rates are extremely high with approximately two-thirds of ex-prisoners being rearrested within three years of release, according to the Recidivism Center. It’s estimated that nine million offenders return to prison annually.


It’s clear that there’s not enough support to help ex-prisoners stay out of the correctional system. This is just one element sustaining the disproportionate incarceration of African American males. The likelihood of an African American male being sentenced to prison in his lifetime is one in three, whereas for a Caucasian male it is one in 17, according to The Huffington Post. Similarly, African American females are being sentenced to prison at a far greater rate than Caucasian females.

The criminal justice system needs more resources to improve reintegration efforts and help ex-offenders find adequate jobs and housing so they’re less likely to re-offend. Helping ex-prisoners successfully reintegrate into society will not only reduce costly recidivism rates, but, in many cases, will help break the intergenerational cycle of criminality.

Improving Housing Options for Ex-Prisoners

Most ex-prisoners will return to the same communities they lived and socialized in before their arrest. In many cases, these are neighborhoods that have high rates of poverty and crime, leaving many residents feeling disenfranchised from society with little access to social support programs.

In a prior publication, “Prisoner Reintegration Challenges of Assimilation and Crime Desistance,” I concluded that most ex-prisoners returning to these communities will face uncertainty over their future and animosity from a predominantly unforgiving society, as well as a multitude of personal, social, and legal barriers that prevent them from leading law-abiding lives.

Finding safe and affordable housing is difficult for ex-prisoners who often face limitations on where they can live. Many times, low-income public housing is their only choice. These housing developments are often overrun with drugs, gang violence, and other criminogenic factors. Private housing is often not an option because ex-prisoners are exclusively barred from the private housing market due to the stigma of being an ex-felon.

In some cases, even the public housing market has banned ex-prisoners from renting or leasing an apartment, which can happen if the criminal conviction was drug-related, a sexual offense, or a crime of violence as outlined in the exclusionary policies of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. If ex-prisoners are forced to return to the same destructive environment that contributed to their initial incarceration, they will often submit to the same temptations and reoffend.

Barriers to Employment for Ex-Prisoners

Along with obtaining suitable housing, finding and maintaining employment can greatly improve an ex-prisoner’s odds of leading a crime-free, productive life. However, ex-prisoners face the society-wide stigma of being an ex-convict, which severely limits the number of sustainable job opportunities available to them.

Many employers conduct criminal history checks on prospective employees and reject anyone with a criminal history. In a somewhat dated, yet significant Urban Institute study from 2003, more than 90 percent of employers surveyed were willing to consider filling job vacancies with welfare recipients, while only about 40 percent were willing to consider hiring an ex-prisoner.

Companies in the retail and service sector that require contact with customers are among the most unlikely to consider hiring a convict. Employer reluctance is greatest when the offense in question was a violent one and least when it was a nonviolent drug offense.

Many ex-prisoners are limited to working inconsistent, low-wage jobs – such as in construction or manufacturing – that make it incredibly difficult to support themselves and their families. In addition, ex-prisoners are often mandated to pay further penalties including parole supervision fees, court costs, restitution, child support, drug-testing fees, counseling fees, and more.

To complicate matters further, finding employment opportunities can be especially challenging because many offenders have limited work histories. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, more than one third of all prisoners were unemployed at the time of arrest.

Educational Obstacles to Finding Employment

The National Reentry Resource Center concluded that only about half of incarcerated adults have a high school degree or its equivalent, compared with 85 percent of the adult population. In Prisoner Reintegration Challenges of Assimilation and Crime Desistance, I noted that most ex-prisoners do not have viable, marketable job skills, or sufficient literacy to obtain gainful employment.

To compound matters, many prisoners have a learning disability. According to Joan Petersilia, 11 percent of prisoners have a documented learning disability compared with only 3 percent of the general adult population.

While there are some educational opportunities available to inmates while they are imprisoned, only one third of all prisoners choose to participate. Educational programming, including specific classes that focus on GED preparation, adult basic education, and learning English as a second language, would collectively improve odds of employment.

There’s no doubt that more must be done to help break down the barriers that hinder ex-prisoners from leading law-abiding and productive lives. Helping them find adequate housing and providing educational opportunities that leads to gainful employment are all critical to successful reintegration and reductions in recidivism. However, ultimate change must come from the offender. The ex-prisoner can break the cycle of criminality only by changing his or her unlawful ways. Ex-prisoners must abstain from crime, substance abuse, and other problematic areas which put themselves at risk. They must also seek out opportunities to improve their situation and put in the work and effort to lead productive and lawful lives.

About the Author: Dr. Michael Pittaro is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice with American Military University and an Adjunct Professor at East Stroudsburg University. Dr. Pittaro is a criminal justice veteran, highly experienced in working with criminal offenders in a variety of institutional and non-institutional settings. Before pursuing a career in higher education, Dr. Pittaro worked in corrections administration; has served as the Executive Director of an outpatient drug and alcohol facility and as Executive Director of a drug and alcohol prevention agency. Dr. Pittaro has been teaching at the university level (online and on-campus) for the past 15 years while also serving internationally as an author, editor, presenter, and subject matter expert. Dr. Pittaro holds a BS in Criminal Justice; an MPA in Public Administration; and a PhD in criminal justice. To contact the author, please email IPSauthor@apus.edu. For more articles featuring insight from industry experts, subscribe to In Public Safety’s bi-monthly newsletter.




Companies that hire felons





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Jobs for Felons: Why Ex-Prisoners Struggle to Successfully Reintegrate into Society




Eric Mayo

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Sunday, May 6, 2018

Disabled felon needs help finding jobs

Disabled felon needs help finding jobs


Jobs for disabled FelonsHello,

I am Shaun. I was convicted of assault with a deadly weapon inflicting serious injury about 6-7 
yrs ago. I am a barber now, however I have an injury now that has put me out of work. I desire a new career but have much concern as to what I should go into because of my past. Do you have any advice for me or maybe people that would like to help me.

sincerely,

Shaun

 

 



Disabled felon needs help finding jobs




Hello Shaun,

I suggest you contact your local One-Stop Career Center. There you will find a list of services that can help ex-offenders and felons find new careers including training and job search services. Most Career centers have counselors who have experience assisting ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs. There are also contacts with other agencies that offer vocational rehabilitation and employment opportunities for those with disabilities.

You can find the nearest One-stop Career Center here:


 www.servicelocator.org
 


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Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Disabled felon needs help finding jobs

Disabled felon needs help finding jobs



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Tuesday, May 1, 2018

Meet Larry, an ex-offender who got a second chance thanks to a good law









Meet Larry, an ex-offender who got a second chance thanks to a good law
Last year, I wrote a highly critical opinion piece for the Sun-Times about Gov. Bruce Rauner after learning that he had denied clemency for a client of mine.

Given Rauner’s extreme reluctance to grant clemency to ex-offenders, even to those like my client who had gone on to live honest and productive lives for many years, I questioned why anybody would bother to file the petition.

Though I couldn’t  know it at the time, however, that same governor soon would lay the groundwork for my client to earn a second chance. In August 2017, Rauner signed House Bill 2373 into law. This legislation resulted in a significant expansion of the kinds of criminal records a judge can decide to seal from public view.

Last month, as a result of that law, a judge granted my client’s petition to seal his record, closing the book on my client’s addiction-fueled criminal conduct, which began when he was 17 and ended when he was 31.  Today, he is 51.

My client’s story, which he has given me permission to tell as long as I don’t use his real name, reminds us that people who make bad decisions as teens and young adults still can grow into law-abiding, productive members of society. If we don’t start believing in our human capacity to change — to learn from our mistakes — we will fail to see the potential in many of our fellow, returning citizens.

My client, Larry, grew up in Chicago with an alcoholic father. His mother managed apartment buildings. Neither of his parents graduated from high school. Larry himself struggled in school, and was diagnosed with dyslexia in the fifth grade. Once assigned to special ed classes, he was teased and bullied relentlessly.

The summer before Larry entered high school, he started drinking beer. By his freshman year, he was smoking weed and using cocaine. He dropped out of school after his sophomore year. A year later, he was arrested for the first time.

He was charged with felony burglary and sentenced to probation.

In no time at all, Larry had gone from high school dropout to convicted felon. His future did not bode well. It is estimated that more than 70 percent of the men and women in United States prisons did not graduate from high school.

Larry’s next arrest, for residential burglary, occurred while he was still on probation. He was sentenced to prison – the first of two prison stints he would serve before turning 20. Larry’s preferred choice of crime? Breaking into cars, though he wasn’t particularly good at it. He was usually drunk or high when arrested.

In 1990, Larry picked up his fourth — and final — felony conviction. He was spared prison, though, sentenced instead to an intensive, in-patient drug treatment.

Larry struggled with his sobriety for another 10 years. But a health scare in 2000 finally convinced him to stop drinking and drugging.

Today, Larry takes his sobriety seriously. He has been sober for nearly 18 years. He attends Alcoholics Anonymous meetings three times a week.

A couple of years ago, he met his wife at an AA meeting. With her encouragement and support, he started meeting with a literacy tutor. At the time, his reading comprehension was that of a second grader. Today, he can read at a fifth-grade level.

So there you have it: Larry is sober. He can read a bit better. And he always manages to work for a living, despite his significant educational deficits. The jobs he has found, such as valet parking attendant, don’t pay well, but they are honorable and he has gotten by.

I met Larry and his wife in 2015 and filed his clemency petition in 2016. While the petition was pending, Larry was selected to be a participant in the CTA’s Second Chance Program, cleaning buses and rail cars. Recently, he completed his second full year in the program.

Earlier this year, shortly before a judge granted his petition to seal his criminal record — made possible by the law Rauner signed — Larry learned that his name has been added to the CTA’s hire list.

Over the years, Larry has learned not to give up on himself. And today, he says at age 51, he feels like a “different man.”

He’s a man of few words, but on the day after the judge granted his petition, he called me to say thanks.

How did he feel?

“Really, really good,” Larry said with a chuckle. “Like I never got in trouble before, though I know I did.”

Ina R. Silvergleid is a Chicago attorney and owner of A Bridge Forward LLC. She specializes in helping people with a criminal background eliminate barriers to employment, professional licensing and housing.


Companies that hire Felons


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Eric Mayo

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Thursday, January 18, 2018

Will a withheld adjudication keep me from jobs?

Will a withheld adjudication keep me from jobs?


Will a withheld adjudication keep me from jobs?
Hello,

I was convicted of a criminal offense here in Florida for theft back in 2010. I am currently attending school and in my senior year at Saint Leo University and am majoring in criminal justice with a minor in homeland security.

Adjudication was withheld from the case, but I'm scared that when I graduate, and get off probation I won't be able to find a job in my degree field. Do you have any recommendations on what to do. I am also currently unemployed and finding a problem find a job as well.

Thanks,

Wayne


Will a withheld adjudication keep me from jobs?



Hello Wayne,

Will a withheld adjudication keep me from jobs?I get a lot of questions about withheld adjudication / deferred judgement. Lets understand what it means to ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs. Withheld adjudication generally refers to a decision by a judge to put a person on probation without an adjudication of guilt. There will be terms set by the court usually a fine and a period of probation. Once the terms are met, the charges are typically dropped. There will be no conviction associated with that offense. If the person does not complete the terms of probation, a finding of guilty may be entered and the person may be sentenced according to the punishments defined for the offense.

So when completing an application that asks if you "Have you ever been convicted of a crime, you can answer "no" and rightly so because you haven't. Bear in mind that the charge will appear on a background check as a charge and not a conviction. You should have no problem with this. To absolutely certain of the status, you should check with the prosecutor or your probation officer associated with your case.

Will a withheld adjudication keep me from jobs?
As for finding a job in Florida, I suggest you contract your nearest One-stop Career Center. There you will find a variety of services that can help you find your next job. You probably can find counselors who will work with you one-on-one to help you. You can find your nearest One-stop Career Center here:
One-stop Career Centers

I hope this helps.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: What is the difference between a withheld of adjudication and an adjudication?






Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Will a withheld adjudication keep me from jobs?


How to get a job with a criminal record


Will a withheld adjudication keep me from jobs?


 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Withheld Adjudication | Deferred Adjudication

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Thursday, November 16, 2017

Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?

Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?


Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?
Hello sir,

I have a question. I am currently in the process of applying to work for the New York City Board of Education but I am worried that I may not get the job because I have a juvenile conviction. I was arrested on grounds for felony for reckless endangerment but I took a plea bargain and opted out for a misdemeanor instead. I was arrested back 91/2 years ago.

I have to get my fingerprints taken and have a background check done on me so I am nervous that my conviction will pop up. And I have a sealed record but I am wondering will that also affect anything in my applying to work for the New York City board of Education.



I get a lot of questions like this from juvenile ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs.

Let me understand. You are afraid that a 9 1/2 yr. old juvenile misdemeanor conviction will stop the New York City Board of Education from hiring you.

Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?It is my understanding that juvenile records are sealed and can only be seen by the court system, law enforcement and government agencies. Even if it were public, I doubt anyone would hold a 9 1/2 yr. old juvenile misdemeanor charge against you.

Here in NJ where I am, job applicants are not even bound to include juvenile convictions. I'm not sure about NY state. To be absolutely sure, I would contact someone in your local legal aid office for clarification.

I hope this helps.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights






 Companies that Hire Felons

Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!


Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?


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Monday, November 6, 2017

Can a Felon be a Licensed Counselor?

Can a Felon be a Licensed Counselor?


Can a Felon be a Licensed Counselor?
Hi,

My name is Kerry and I came across a blog for felons. My boyfriend is currently in prison. He wants to go to school upon being released to be a counselor for inner city teens. Is it possible to obtain a license in counseling being a convicted felony? I'm currently applying for grad school to get my LPCC in mental health and we're looking to start our own private practice. I you can give me some information that will truly be appreciated.

Thank you,

Kerry

Can a Felon be a Licensed Counselor?


Hello Kerry,

The best suggestion I can give you and your husband is to contact the medical licensing board in your state. I know of felons who have jobs as certified counselors so I guess it depends on the state and the nature of the felony.  If you find out that you can be licensed, speak to a counselor.  Learn what it takes to get started.  If possible, volunteer in a treatment center to get a feel for working with people who have substance issues.

I hope this helps.

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Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Can a Felon be a Licensed Counselor?

Can a Felon be a Licensed Counselor?

Stop Wishing For a Job and Learn How to Get One!

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

  Can a Felon be a Licensed Counselor?


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Monday, October 23, 2017

Felon with professional experience needs a job

Felon with professional experience needs a job

Felon with professional experience needs a job
Hello,

Thanks for creating your Blogspot on information for Ex-offenders. I am a first time offender who was convicted in 2007 and is having a hard time with gainful employment. I have approximately 17 years of human resources experience in the federal government service and 2.5 years of retail service. My felony is one of moral turpitude (forgery/utter forged check/obtaining money by false pretenses) which makes it difficult because of the trust factor. I would like to know if you have any recommendations for me to seeking gainful employment. I am currently on indefinite supervised probation for the payment of my restitution. Any recommendations would be greatly appreciated.

  Felon with professional experience needs a job



Hello,

Felon with professional experience needs a jobOften convictions involving integrity or any type of theft conviction are often some of the toughest to overcome. I would suggest you contact the United Way in your office. The United Way supports a number of social services some of which offer assistance to ex-offenders and felons in need of jobs and other forms ex-offender / felon advocacy groups that know of companies that hire people with criminal backgrounds.
of aid. There may be positions for qualified professionals available in one of their member organizations. They may also be able to put you in contact with

Felon with professional experience needs a jobIn the meantime, since you have clerical experience, I suggest you try temporary employment.  In many cases, temporary jobs turn into permanent jobs.  For ex-offenders and felons looking to get temp jobs, I suggest applying to small independent agencies rather the nationally known ones.  Smaller agencies can hire whomever they feel will be good.  The larger companies are more likely to have restrictions regarding the hiring of people with criminal records.  Take a look at the link below:


Temporary Agencies are a good Choice for Ex-offenders and Felons


I hope this helps.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon with professional experience needs a job

Felon with professional experience needs a job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felon with professional experience needs a job


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Thursday, October 12, 2017

Felon wants job as Cosmetologist

Felon wants job as Cosmetologist


Felon wants job as Cosmetologist
Cosmetology Jobs for Felons
I am an LPN and have first offender charges of prescription fraud (doctor shopping) on my record. Due to injuries sustained in an auto accident and medications needed and prescribed by my neurologist, I can no longer practice as a nurse. I have undergone extensive counseling and am still paying fines. I wanted to contest the charges due to my medical records supporting my prescriptions. I instead was advised to take these charges to avoid another more severe charge.



My question is, can my charges on my record affect my application and testing to be a licensed cosmetologist? I want to be a productive citizen of society and support my son and myself. I want to try something else and I think I can and will enjoy this field but want to know these things before I invest the money in training.


Felon wants job as Cosmetologist



Felon wants job as CosmetologistUnfortunately you are forced to change careers.  Barbering/Cosmetology is a great field to get into not only for employment but there are are opportunities for self-employment down the line.  I know of felons who have good careers in that field.  I would suggest that you contact the Cosmetology Licensing Board in your state. They will be able to tell you if you are eligible.  If you are unemployed, you may even be eligible for for free training through your state's department of labor


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Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon wants job as Cosmetologist


Felon wants job as Cosmetologist

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felon wants job as Cosmetologist


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Monday, October 2, 2017

Felon wants a Military Career

Felon wants a Military Career

Felon wants a Military Career

Can I Join the Army with a Felony?

Hello I hope you can help......

Well I was charged with failure to stop after having an accident involving personal injury and I'm a little misunderstanding of what it means for it being a class four felony. I want to get into the military cuz lets face it at this point in time the chances of me getting a decent job to support me and family is really really low with this charge on me.

 I don't see any other options cuz from wut I have been gathering with web browsing you can't get certain certificates and degrees to work and money is not real good at the moment to just lolly gag so my questions are as follows

1. Can I get it expunged?

2. Is it a felony misdemeanor

3. How would I go about tryin to get in the military with this?

4. What states would this not count as a felony....... and I'm sorry if its a lot or jus very scrambled. I want the best for my child and wife so I'm a little everywhere with this but I'm looking forward to this response thank you.


Ernesto

  Felon wants a Military Career



Hello Ernesto,

Questions 1, 2 and 4 are best answered by an attorney. Often ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs need legal assistance. I suggest contacting your local legal aid office. There you will probably be able to get low-cost or low-cost legal advice. They may be also be able to answer questions about ex-offenders and felons getting professional certifications. 

Felon wants a Military Career
Just a note on expungement, it is not an option in every state.  Even in states which allow them, often they are limited.  For example, in New Jersey, where I am, one is allowed only one felony expungement.  It cannot even be applied for until ten years after the termination of the sentence.  Expungement is not a cure all.  Even if one is granted, the conviction will always be visible to the court system, government agencies and law enforcement.

Felon wants a Military Career
Don't give up on a military career. The military often accepts ex-offenders and felons and there are many career options. Your best option is the Army. The Army seems to be the most liberal as it relates to accepting ex-offenders and felons. Contact you local Army recruiter to inquire about your eligibility.

I hope this helps.

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Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Truth About Background Checks

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
 Felon wants a Military Career

 Felon wants a Military Career

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felon wants a Military Career



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Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?
If I do pre-trial intervention and then all my record gets sealed once I complete the courses, what do I have to say in an interview when they ask about anything on my criminal record they should know about?

Kayla






 Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?


Hello Kayla,

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?
Pre-trial intervention is usually offered to first time offenders whose offenses are not that bad.  In different states it may have different names such as, Deferred Adjudication, Deferred Judgement or Deferred Sentence. There are terms associated with pre-trial intervention, usually a fine and probation.  In most cases when the terms of pre-tral intervention are met, the charges are essentially dropped. Because the charges were dropped, there is no conviction. Record of this can only be seen by the court system, law enforcement and certain government agencies. There will always be a record of the initial charge but it will show as dropped.  With pre-trial intervention, there is an initial plea of guilty. It is my understanding, at the end of the probationary period, if you have complied with all the conditions of probation and the fine is paid, the guilty plea is considered withdrawn, the case is dismissed and no conviction enters. This is because a conviction is not final until there has been both a guilty plea or finding of guilt and the imposition of sentence. Since sentencing does not occur before the end of the probationary term, there is no conviction.  Have you been convicted of a crime?  The answer is "no".  This is not legal advice.  If you want to get the details of your case, contact the probation officer assigned to you.


 Many ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs apply for expungement which means that you can apply to have your charge hidden from public view. Both the charge and the pre-trial intervention will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies. This may not be an option for you since most employers are only concerned with convictions

I often suggest to ex-offenders and felons looking for a job to seek assistance at their local legal aid office.

I hope this helps.

Please Rate This Post at the Top!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?


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Tuesday, September 5, 2017

Felon with old conviction needs a job

Felon with old conviction needs a job

 
Felon with old conviction needs a job
Dear Sir,

My name is Anthony, and I’m currently 49 years old. I am having severe difficulties obtaining employment due to a crime (convicted of Attempted Robbery 1) I committed when I was 16. I was convicted at 18, and served 3 years in the N.Y. penal system. I’ve worked as a machinist for over 25 years, and since 2005, in industrial sales. I was just on a 2 1/2 hour job interview today, which looked extremely promising – until I was asked if I had ever been convicted of a crime. I was informed 40 min. ago that I would not be considered due to this. What are the costs? I will pay whatever is necessary to have this sealed and get my life on track.

Why, 31 years later, is this haunting me now more than ever? Thanks,

Anthony

Felon with old conviction needs a job



Your difficulty finding jobs may be more a symptom of the present economy rather that you being a felon. Ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs are particularly hit hard by this tough job market.

Felon with old conviction needs a job
As far as sealing your conviction, you may have to seek legal assistance to see if this is a viable option in your state. May I suggest your local legal aid office. There you will find low-cost or even no-cost assistance as well as advice on you options in your state, Check you local telephone directory for the nearest legal aid office.  Bear in mind that sealing your record does have its limitations.  It will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies.

Felon with old conviction needs a jobNext, I suggest to all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs to visit their local One-stop Career center. One-stop Career Centers are underutilized resources that can provide a wide array of services that you help you find a job or start a new career.

You can find your nearest One-stop Career Center here:

One-Stop Career Centers

In the meantime take a look at the video below:

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Felon with old conviction needs a job

Felon with old conviction needs a job

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Monday, August 21, 2017

Felons should always be honest applying for jobs

Felons should always be honest applying for jobs

Felons should always be honest applying for jobs

Tight job market is good for felons, people with disabilities

and others who are hard to employ

I was arrested in May of 2008 for the charge of burglary. I took a plea agreement that lessened the conviction to Felony Trespassing (3rd degree) in New Jersey. My question is if potential employers will see something like Trespassing as just as bad as any other felony or if I am worrying too much and thinking I will be constantly passed over for jobs because I am grouped in the same "Felony" category as people who have committed violent crimes, robbery, and etc. I have a college degree and 2 years work experience in a media-related field but keep applying to jobs with the notion that my charges are always going to hold me back from getting a job within the field of media, marketing, and promotion. With so many employers conducting background checks, I just want to see how a Felony Trespassing charge looks to them and if I am still hireable. Thank you so much for taking the time to help a person in need.

-A

Felons should always be honest applying for jobs


Hello A,

Felons should always be honest applying for jobsI encourage all ex-offenders and felons to always be honest when applying for jobs.  Your situation isn't as bad as it seems. Trespassing is a relatively minor offense and there are no integrity questions surrounding it. Whenever the question comes up on an application or on an interview, be honest. Typically on an application, the question will be, "Have you been convicted of a crime other than a traffic violation?" You will answer honestly.

In reference to convictions, it is necessary to list all relative information. Include the name of
the conviction, date, location, and the disposition (time served, fine and/or probation.)

Example:


Trespassing (isolated incident) 8/12/08 Newark, NJ Probation 6 mos

I used the notation "isolated incident." It gives the impression that you are not a criminal, but a person that just found himself in a bad situation...something that can happen to anyone. If the question comes up, don't go into detail, just give an answer just like that.

The most important thing I suggest to all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs is to be honest. there no sense in being dishonest only to lose a job when a background check is done.

I hope this helps


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Felons should always be honest applying for jobs

Felons should always be honest applying for jobs

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Thursday, July 13, 2017

Felon feels background checks are unfair

Felon feels background checks are unfair

Felon feels background checks are unfair

What happens when a potential employer does a background check on you 

Hi Eric,


Thanks for allowing this email, and starting your blog. Although I do not know your credentials, or where you get your knowledge, just knowing there is an open discourse is helpful to those of us who feel desperate.

I am an ex offender who was convicted in 1977, and 1978 for 2 separate offenses. 

1977 robbery- this was a teenage indiscretion of joyriding in a stolen car with someone who lifted a set of keys from a key hook on the wall in a home where we attended a party and then, staying silent after we were caught. The robbery charge is because the keys were stolen from inside the home, making it a point of law 1978 for possession of a controlled substance. The reason I give that summary is to articulate the injustice of this practice of culling ex-offenders from the workforce. Particularly someone who has not been in trouble for over 33 years. Especially when, for decades, I have been employed successfully. In fact, I have a B.A. and an Associates in Applied Science degree- both with honors. I am currently unemployed, and unable to get past the background requirements for employment, and have been eliminated from numerous jobs that I would otherwise have gotten.

 My question's are these:

1.) How is it not a violation of our constitutional rights for a potential employer to data mine our info. without standing? And, have us self incriminate as a pre-employment requirement? Isn't the Constitutional protections for minority rights?

2.) What are the statistics of ex- offenders currently in USA? In other words how many millions of people are affected by this practice? Has this been challenged in the courts?
My belief is that our Constitution is piece of paper that becomes animated by the people who stand up for their own rights. After all, it is the minority that needs the protections, not majority opinion. That is the purpose of the document. Furthermore, without class action, the ACLU will not challenge this practice. How could we mount a class action challenge to this practice? I could go on ad infinitum, but I will just close with a sincere thank you for the work you are doing to help others get through this.


Best Regards,

Pablo

Felon feels background checks are unfair



Felon feels background checks are unfair

“Ban the Box” and Background Checks


Hello Pablo,

It is the responsibility of every employer to hire the best person they can find for any job. Having a criminal record does not necessarily eliminate you from consideration from any job. An employer is trying to get some idea of the type of people that are applying.

Too often with ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs assume that they were maligned because because they have criminal convictions. In many cases the may be correct but that is
difficult or nearly impossible to prove. I am of African descent. I have often thought that was the reason that I didn't get many jobs that I know I was more than qualified for. Rather that wallow in anger and self-pity, my other choice was to keep applying for each and every job I felt I fit.

When speaking of the laws and the constitution, being a child of the sixties, I can tell you that laws do not change attitudes. Laws may say that I am equal but until individual prejudices go away.

My advice is to not give in to your frustrations but let them motivate you.

I hope this helps.



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Felon feels background checks are unfair

Felon feels background checks are unfair

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felon feels background checks are unfair



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