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Showing posts with label felon employment. Show all posts
Showing posts with label felon employment. Show all posts

Monday, February 11, 2019

Felon with DUI needs help finding jobs

Felon with DUI need help finding jobs



 Felon with DUI needs help finding jobs
Hello,

In 2007 I was charged with two separate DUI offenses. The first one that I had ever received was in March and I got a second one in October. I received these charges during my own personal time off from work. At the time I was a driver for a beer distributor, ironically. I didn't report back to work because I was certain that I would be fired, after all I was unable to perform the job for which I was initially hired. Since then, I have had much difficulty finding a job, and it is extremely depressing. I have a family to support, and I am desperately seeking any help that I can get.


 Felon with DUI needs help finding jobs



Hello,

I'm guessing that your license has been taken away. Your career may be over and it may not be. I'm going to suggest two things. First, I suggest that look into a Certificate of Rehabilitation.  A Certificate of Rehabilitation is a court order, which declares that a person who has been convicted of a felony is rehabilitated. If a petition for a Certificate of Rehabilitation is granted, it is forwarded to the Governor by the granting court and constitutes an application for a pardon.

Then you want to look into a Certificate of Good Conduct. The purpose of is is to provide evidence that you have been rehabilitated for employment and other purposes. It shows you are a law-abiding citizen and fully rehabilitated. It has no other legal effect.


These certificates are not available in all states.  It would be a good idea to contact your local legal aid office where you may get assistance at a low cost or even no cost.


As always, I suggest ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs to contact their local One-stop Career center with help with their job search efforts. You can find the nearest center to you here:

http://www.servicelocator.org

I hope this helps.




Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record




Felon with DUI need help finding jobs






 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | DWI | DUI


Felon with DUI needs help finding jobs

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Wednesday, January 2, 2019

Recovering felon needs a job

Recovering felon needs a job


Recovering felon needs a job
I have a felony conviction for theft.  It's the only spot on my otherwise clean record. I am a compulsive gambler who is attending Gamblers Anonymous and getting treatment from a psychiatrist. I have been looking for work for a long, long time and can't even get a call back.

Previously I worked as an accountant but my addiction will keep me from that type of work.  I would like a shipping/receiving or an inside sales position or maybe a dispatch job. All these positions are ones that I worked before I started my accounting career.



Recovering felon needs a job



First of all I wish you success on your recovery.  I'm not sure what state you live in but some states offer what is known as Certificate of Rehabilitation.  A Certificate of Rehabilitation is a court order, which declares that a person who has been convicted of a felony is rehabilitated.  If a petition for a Certificate of Rehabilitation is granted, it is forwarded to the Governor by the granting court and constitutes an application for a pardon. 

This information is not intended as legal advice.  You should consult a qualified professional that is experienced in this field.   One option is to contact your local legal aid office where you may qualify for free or low cost legal services that can help with this process.  The legal aid office may also have relationships with employers who are willing to hire ex-offenders or felons.  Check your local telephone directory to find the legal aid office nearest you

Recovering felon needs a jobA suggestion I make to all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs is to go to your nearest One-stop Career Center.

One-stop Career Centers are very underutilized resources that ex-offenders and felons can use not only to gain employment, but to get vocational guidance and preparation. Also, these centers offer a long list of useful services. Some services available are:

Career planning and counseling

Workshops (Resume Writing, Interviewing Skills, and related topics.)

Computers with internet access and word processing

Daily access to thousands of job listings


Job-related magazines and local newspapers

Job postings and referrals

Printers, fax machines, phones, and copiers for job searching

Every center is staffed with trained counselors that provide one-on-one help for job seekers. Many of them have experience helping ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs.

As stated in a previous post, you can find your nearest center here:

www.servicelocator.org


I hope this helps.

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Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where Ex-offenders and Felons Can Find Jobs



Are you an Ex-offender with a criminal record? You could have your question answered right here. Email your question to: adogzheart2@gmail.com.


Recovering felon needs a job




Recovering felon needs a job

 

Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Recovering felon needs a job

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Saturday, December 15, 2018

Can a Juvenile Felon get Jobs in Healthcare?

Can a Juvenile Felon get Jobs in Healthcare?

 

I was 16 years old,  I got arrested. I was put in the wrong situation which involved my mother and her boyfriend. I was told they took a plea and allowed the felony to be put on me. I went and got certified in nursing was working for 12 years and now it is haunting me. I love healthcare and want to try to stay in the field. I feel that I belong helping others. I just want a good paying job that I love to go to everyday. Is there anything out there I can work or go to school for?


Can a Juvenile Felon get Jobs in Healthcare?



Can a Juvenile Felon get Jobs in Healthcare? I get this often from ex-offenders and felons with juvenile records who are looking for jobs. Contrary to what many people believe, juvenile records do not disappear when on reaches the age of adult. In many states, juvenile records are sealed. Sealed meaning they are hidden from the public. They will always be available, however, to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies. Since many jobs in health care require licensing or certifications there will be the question of can you be certified.

You will have contact the medical licensing board in your state to see if your conviction will keep you from being certified or licensed.

I hope this helps

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 Can a Juvenile Felon get Jobs in Healthcare?


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Juvenile Record | Careers for Felons| Medical Careers for Felons

Can a Juvenile Felon get Jobs in Healthcare?

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Monday, December 10, 2018

Wife of felon wants to help him get a job

Wife of felon wants to help him get a job


Wife of felon wants to help him get a job
Hello,

My husband has been released from prison after ten years about 3 months ago. Since than time we're finding it very hard for him to find employment. I mean extremely hard and he has become very depressed. He has gone to target, walmart, meijers, home depot, best buy, Kroger's, McDonald's, kfc, you name it we have filled out applications. He has called them on several occasions to check back about employment. He has two violent felonies and has had many doors slammed in his face. He just feels like giving up. I don't want him to do anything drastic at this point. I really don't know how much more to help him. Is there any advice you can offer us? It would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Concerned Wife



Wife of felon wants to help him get a job



I'm sorry your husband is having so much trouble. Having two violent felonies makes getting a job difficult. It's time for some out-of-the-box thinking.

My suggestion is for him to contact his parole or probation officer. Often they know of employers who hire felons. They also have felons on their caseloads who have gotten jobs. perhaps the officer can point him in the direction of these employers.

Another strategy that often works is to have your husband contact the judge who sentenced him. Judges are influential people with many contacts. He can express to the judge how important getting a job is and his desire to stay on the right side of the law. He should ask the judge for any assistance he can offer. You will be surprised at how effective this will be.

I hope this helps.

Please Rate This Post at the Top!

 Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can felons get Jobs

 Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Wife of felon wants to help him get a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Wife of felon wants to help him get a job

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Thursday, October 4, 2018

Why companies are turning to ex-cons to fill slots for workers

  • More American companies, such as McDonald's and Delta Air Lines, are hiring ex-cons as part of their inclusion strategy.
  • Executives say 82 percent of their ex-offender hires have been at least as successful as their average hire, according to a report by the Society of Human Resources Management.
  • Only 14 percent of human resources managers won't consider hiring ex-offenders.

Why companies are turning to ex-cons to fill slots for workers
Ty Hookway had to check on an office building his building services company, CleanCraft, was set to clean in upstate New York, and what he saw changed his business and his life. The maintenance person who was supposed to do the work had called in sick, and when Hookway got there, he found one of his newer hires, Sanford Coley, in the building, working away in shorts rather than his uniform.

But what really got Hookway's attention: The shorts revealed that Coley was wearing an ankle bracelet. He was on parole for bank robbery. Hookway hadn't thought to ask about Coley's criminal record.

"I was thinking I should fire him," Hookway said. "Now he's one of my best friends."

More stories like this may be coming to offices like yours. With the job market tight, ex-felons and other workers who often struggled to find jobs are getting a second look, according to a recent report by the Society for Human Resource Management, which surveyed more than 2,000 corporate managers and HR executives nationwide on their attitudes about ex-offenders for a report released in May.

Unemployment among ex-felons isn't explicitly tracked by the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, and it was estimated at 27 percent last year by the Prison Policy Initiative. But some researchers think it's even higher — informal estimates claim as many as half of released convicts failed to find jobs or stayed out of the labor force. Since an estimated one-third of U.S. adults have at least an arrest record, according to the human resources society, it's a lot of people.

"This isn't a problem of aspirations, it's a structural problem involving discrimination and a lack of opportunities available to people who have been to prison," said Lucius Couloute, a policy analyst at the Prison Policy Initiative. "It really takes employers who are willing to let go of their biases in pursuit not only of equality but of the best candidates."

Corporations are showing at least some signs of interest, advocates say. In addition to SHRM's study, the job site Glassdoor barred job listings from employers who intend to weed out ex-offenders. New Jersey-based consultant Eric Mayo says a long list of top American companies have proved themselves open to hiring ex-offenders, mostly for service jobs, ranging from minimum-wage employers from McDonald's to CNBC parent Comcast and, in Mayo's Atlantic City backyard, casinos, which he said are practically cities unto themselves, demanding an array of service workers.

Corporations are showing at least some signs of interest, advocates say. In addition to SHRM's study, the job site Glassdoor barred job listings from employers who intend to weed out ex-offenders. New Jersey-based consultant Eric Mayo says a long list of top American companies have proved themselves open to hiring ex-offenders, mostly for service jobs, ranging from minimum-wage employers from McDonald's to CNBC parent Comcast and, in Mayo's Atlantic City backyard, casinos, which he said are practically cities unto themselves, demanding an array of service workers.

"It really takes employers who are willing to let go of their biases in pursuit not only of equality but of the best candidates."-Lucius Couloute, policy analyst at the Prison Policy Initiative

"I encourage people to apply for every job they feel qualified for," Mayo said. "Even without a felony record, looking for a job is a numbers game.''

To stoke more action, the federal government is offering a tax incentive called the Work Opportunity Tax Credit for employers who hire and retain ex-felons, veterans and individuals from other target groups with significant barriers to employment. Under this program if an employee works at least 120 hours a year, a company can claim a 25 percent tax credit of their first year's wages and 40 percent if he or she works 400 hours.

Some cities and states also offer tax credits and other incentives to employers willing to hire ex-cons and give them a second chance. Philadelphia's Fair Chance Hiring Initiative provides a cash reimbursement to employers who hire felons that have been released from prison within the past five years.

Many employers are apprehensive about hiring felons and look for ways to hedge their risk. They partner with local organizations that work to train ex-cons for jobs and provide other types of rehabilitation services. To find these organizations, state unemployment or workforce development offices can offer referrals.

The Federal Bonding Program is another option companies turn to. This program bonds felons who are hired and mainstreamed by companies of all sizes. The bond provides compensation if an employer suffers theft or loss due to the employee's dishonesty.

Eliminating bias in the workplace

If there is a ground zero for the push to destigmatize a criminal history in the workplace, it is Greyston, a 100-person Yonkers, New York, bakery that makes mostly brownies for a client list that includes Unilever's Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream unit, Amazon's Whole Foods grocery chain and Delta Air Lines. "We consider them the crown jewel of our values-led sourcing program," said Unilever spokesman Sean Greenwood, pointing out that Greyston, while founded by a Buddhist monk with a mission to do good, has balanced its social mission with being a reliable, businesslike supplier for decades.

Greyston's "open hiring" model means that anyone who puts their name on a list for a production job can have one as they become available, CEO Mike Brady said. The trick is, they have to make it through an apprenticeship program designed to test (and build) their basic work aptitudes, such as staying on schedule and working well with others. About half don't make it, Brady said. But enough do to convince Greyston that other companies would be better off investing less in screening out workers and more in training and supporting them to capitalize on second chances and on connecting them to social services they need to support a transition to working life.

More from At Work:



"We'll hire anyone who walks through the front door — no questions asked," said Brady, who estimates that about 40 Greyston workers have criminal records. "We do everything we can to make them successful. But if they're not, we let a lot of people go.''

Two such candidates are one-time drug dealers Dion Drew and Alvin Wilson. Drew, 41, grew up in Yonkers and said he plied his old trade a three-minute walk from Greyston. Wilson, 64, spent nearly a decade after his release as a self-employed contractor, doing everything from carpentry to snow shoveling before coming to work there.

Drew has become an ambassador for open hiring, even doing a Ted Talk with Brady about it. He got out of prison in 2008 after his third conviction, got rejected everywhere he applied, and landed a $7.15-an-hour gig as a Greyston apprentice in 2009. He's now a $25-an-hour supervisor with an eight-year-old daughter and two stepchildren. He claims he has the two dogs and now "just needs the house."

Why companies are turning to ex-cons to fill slots for workers
Greyston CEO Mike Brady with employee Dion Drew, a former drug dealer  


Wilson is a mixer on the brownie line, where the quickly moving array of goodies waiting to be wrapped recall the famous scene from I Love Lucy where the heroines land short-lived jobs in a candy factory (the bakery makes about a tractor-trailer load of brownies daily, or 7 million pounds per year). He was released in 2008, from the last of his five felony cases, and arrived at Greyston two years ago.

Both said their big problem in getting back to work was learning how to take direction and fit in, as people do in the workplace. And each said the biggest difference between themselves and others who fail at reentering society is that they simply decided, while in jail, that they had to do better.

"If you can't make your mind up in 12-and-a-half years what you want to do in life, it's never going to happen," Wilson said.

"I set my goals and plans while I was upstate," Drew added. "I wanted to save money the right way, to have a family. I wanted to put the smile back on my mom's face.''

Greyston now is trying to package its approach to lure in other companies. Just a short drive from its factory, Greyston set up the Center for Open Hiring, which Perry Solomon, a consultant working on the project, described as a way of training companies to "think the right way" — swapping expenses spent finding workers who don't have red flags for more investment in training.

"Where I see the ROI is in tremendous loyalty, productivity and culture," Brady said.

Changing attitudes

A study on employers' attitudes toward hiring ex-felons suggests that many are ready for change. Only 14 percent of human-resources managers won't consider hiring ex-offenders, the report commissioned by the Society of Human Resources Management and funded by the Charles Koch Instituted says. The biggest reason is simple: 82 percent of executives say their ex-offender hires have been at least as successful as their average hire. Other common motivations were to help build communities and give ex-offenders a second chance.

Why companies are turning to ex-cons to fill slots for workers
Greyston's president and CEO Mike Brady in front of the company's Center for Open Hiring


But only 5 percent actively recruit ex-offenders, the survey said. The most important factors in getting hired: A verifiable work history, and some level of education or training after the workers were convicted, indicating that they improved themselves while imprisoned.

That's consistent with a study by the RAND Institute, which found that 59 percent of employers would consider an ex-offender with one conviction if they were given an incentive through a tax credit, which they are offered under federal law. But the biggest difference-maker is if employers can recover staffing-agency fees they pay to find workers who don't stick with the job, or get the agencies to find them a replacement worker for free if they take a chance on an ex-offender who doesn't work out.

Rand found that employers are much less willing to look at felons with a history of violence, such as robbery charges, Rand scholar Priscilla Hunt said.

"What they responded to was staffing-agency fees," Hunt said. "Even more than if you increased the [tax credit] money."

What doesn't appear to work as well is trying to force employers' hands by forbidding them to ask about criminal records on job applications. So-called "ban the box" laws, named for the check-box next to questions about whether applicants have records, often lead to racial discrimination, as employers screen out a broad swath of minority applicants in order to avoid interviewing ex-offenders, according to research by Rutgers University economist Amanda Agan.

Screening out ex-offenders can also subject employers to liability for policies that have a disproportionate racial impact, said Dariely Rodriguez, director of the economic justice project at the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.

"Employers have an obligation not to discriminate," Rodriguez said. "They have an obligation to root out bias."

Mostly, employers can help ex-offenders while also helping themselves, Hookway said.

"You have to develop the culture where everyone is on board," Hookway said, comparing ex-offenders with work-friendly attitudes to people who have succeeded in addiction treatment. "Once they get on the right side, they become advocates. They'll hold other employees accountable. They want it more."




Why companies are turning to ex-cons to fill slots for workers


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Eric Mayo

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Monday, September 24, 2018

Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs

Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs

 

Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs
Hello,

I have a police record. One charge is for domestic violence. It shows assault and battery. I was ordered to counseling, Which turned into grief counseling because of the reasons the fight happened. The other charge is a false charge that I am in the process of requesting expungement. There were no charges or a court hearing. I was having a drink with a friend. A known drug dealer was in the bar and asked to buy me a drink. I did not accept, we talked for about 5 minutes and he left. All of a sudden an undercover policeman shows me his badge and asked if we can talk outside. I go out with him and was questioned about the drug dealer. I said I didn't know him and had no information to offer. Before I knew it there were police cars, I was in handcuffs and put in jail for 3 days. 3 times a day I was taken from my cell and questioned. Every time I had no informational new charges kept getting added to my record.

After 3 days I was released and my record now shows dangerous drugs. Both of these happened 20 years ago. I have passed 3 tests to be a TSA screener my 4th test is Tuesday. When I pass this they will run a background check. At what point do I explain this to someone? I currently work at KMart and they ran a background check but hired me without asking questions. It was the same with Home Depot as well! Do you know if TSA is strict about 20 years ago? Do you know if they ask for an explanation of my background? I really need a job with a good paycheck and I've always wanted this particular job!

Thank you for helping me!

Sincerely,

Sally


Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs



Hello Sally,

Generally speaking, when talking about records, employers are concerned with convictions and not charges. As I tell all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, answer honestly on both applications and interviews. If applications asks for convictions, only lists convictions, not charges. As far as interviews, nearly all of the questions will be related to information from your application. I encourage ex-offenders and felons not to volunteer information that is not asked for.

Expungement, or sealing does not erase records but hides them from public view. If an is granted the conviction will always be visible to government agencies, the court system and law enforcement. You mentioned that you have applied for a TSA position. Since this is a government position, all of your charges will be visible. Once again, if questioned, always answer honestly.

I hope this helps.

Background Checks and Criminal Records



Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights


 Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs


'Eric Mayo helps Felons and Ex-offenders get Jobs.

 

 Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

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Sunday, September 16, 2018

Former felons deserve a second chance

The Times Herald - Published 3:42 p.m. ET Sept. 11, 2018

Former felons deserve a second chance
One of the things that is Pure Michigan is sending people to prison. Although incarceration rates have fallen the past few years, there are three times as many people in Michigan prisons now than there were four decades ago. If Michigan were a country, it would have one of the top 20 incarceration rates in the world and would likely be on a State Department watch list.

More than six of every 100 Michiganders is in prison. About twice as many are former felons, those who have been released from prison, although many are still repaying a debt to society they no long owe.

It turns out that society needs them. Michigan needs them to get up in the morning and come to work. For many, though, that isn’t possible because one of the first things many employers ask, after name and address on a job application, is whether the applicant has been convicted of a felony.

One of those who would have to answer yes is the voice of those Pure Michigan commercials. Ten years before “Home Improvement” and 18 years before the debut of the state tourism campaign, Tim Allen was paroled from federal prison where he was serving three to seven years after being arrested with almost a pound and a half of cocaine.

Allen found work after his felony convictions.

Other former felons should be given the same chance. Many won’t. Some former felons are reluctant to apply for jobs, knowing they will have to check that box. Many employers won’t look past that blemish on a potential asset’s past history. Either way, applicants don’t get interviewed, employers don’t learn about important and relevant training and experience, well qualified people won’t get jobs and businesses will struggle to fill vital positions.

The felony question isn’t a valid predictor of future performance and should be illegal. In a handful of states and a few cities across the country, it is. A bill to ban it in Michigan never got a committee hearing.

But an executive order of Gov. Rick Snyder, Michigan last week just became one of about three dozen states that doesn’t ask the question of prospective state employees.

The city of Port Huron will no longer ask its applicants if they’ve been convicted of a felony. Beyond being a good business practice, it is part of City Manager James Freed’s campaign to give the city a reputation as a place welcoming to anyone who wants to work.

City Council can’t extend the ban to include other employers in the city, as Austin, Texas, and other cities have done.

That’s because, in March, Snyder signed Senate Bill 353, which prohibits local governments from enacting ordinances that restrict use of the felony question by private employers. Irony is not a crime.

Former felons deserve a second chance



Companies that hire felons

Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


How to get a job with a criminal record

Former felons deserve a second chance


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

Eric Mayo

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Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Social Media can Hurt your Job Search

Jobs for Felons: Social Media can Hurt your Job SearchSocial media has become a huge part of the lives of many people.  It's a great way to connect and network with others all over the world.  I recently made a presentation at job fair where I met employers that have hired felons or ex-offenders in the past.

I asked 30 of the 50 or so employers "Are there any new techniques employers use to screen potential employees?" The overwhelming response was that they check applicant's social media.  Employers have started to monitor a potential employee's social media as a fast and really alternative to expensive background checks.

It's hard enough getting a job with a criminal record.  There can be things on your social media accounts that can make getting jobs for felons even harder.  There are a lot of things that employers look for on social media that can ruin an applicant's chances at getting  hired.  Here are the main things that may catch an employers eye.


Unprofessional Screen Name or Profile - Like it or not, employers will judge you by your screen name so choose wisely.  Names like "Sexy Kitten" or "Big Daddy D" may sound cool for connecting but they really won't help you get a job.  In fact it may hurt your chances to get a job.  You can never go wrong using your own name.

Information about Alcohol or Drug Use - A weekend of hard partying may have been fun but posting about it may really turn employers off.  Pictures of you passed out or impaired may be funny but it won't be to someone who may have wanted to hire you.

Inappropriate Photos or Videos - Picture and video of lewd or provocative behavior posted anywhere is damaging.  Be careful of other people posting stuff with you in it.  This can be equally damaging.  Also be mindful of being photographed or recorded in any situation that may related to criminal behavior.  Being recorded with guns, gang members or drug paraphernalia may boost your street credibility but it will have the opposite effect on your ability to get a job.

Derogatory Comments Related to Religion, Race, Sexual Orientation or Gender - No matter what your personal views are about these subjects, spouting them in a negative way on social media will really make you look bad to an employer especially if personal offense is taken.
Posting these types of things on social media is bad enough but sharing these types of things posted y others will have the same effect.  Also anyone can take anything you have posted and share it.  Even if you have deleted it, negative posts may still alive and shared all over the internet so be careful.

Social media is a sign of the times. It can even be a lot of fun but bear in mind the effect that it may have on your job search.  There are employers that may hire ex-offenders and felons.  Your social media will make a difference to someone who wants to hire a professional mature minded person.  Keep it clean, keep it professional, keep it G-Rated and you should have no problem.


Jobs for Felons: Social Media can Hurt your Job Search


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Jobs for Felons: Social Media can Hurt your Job Search


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


Jobs for Felons: Five Places Felons Can Find Jobs - Get a Job Quickly!


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

Jobs for Felons: Social Media can Hurt your Job Search


Eric Mayo

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Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?

 Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?


Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?
Hi,
And thank you for reading my email. I am a 35 yr old mother who committed a mistake years ago and still today it haunts me.

In the year of 2011 I was in need of a job and came across a guy in school who said he was security guard for a masseuse. Later on he said she was hiring and I'll learn as I go. We met and had a conversation. She explained very little and as we went for a ride gave me a receipt book and said we would talk about it more in a lobby of a hotel where she was staying as she is very busy and travels most of her time. Also asked me to go with security guy to collect payment as she would order food for us.

Story short, I knocked on door with security standing by elevator.  As I walk in, the gentleman hands me money and I don't accept but ask if before I can use restroom. I had a long ride. He replies yes. As I open door, I get bum rushed by the cops and arrested for prostitution.  I had nothing illegal or dressed provocative. The security left and the lady turned phone off. I was sent to county jail for three days and couldn't call family to bail me out with charges like that. In Long Island where it happened, fought it for a year and lowered it down from prostitution felony to misdemeanor violation/indecent exposure.

It's now 2018. Plz, do you think such a case can get expunged in NYC? I went to college have associates in paralegal. Would a violation be shown? I have friend lawyer and through nexus lexus wont show up criminal record but when I sent my fingerprint to FBI, saw that even if it got lowered to violation still shows I got arrested for prostitution.

I want to become a nurse. I don't drink or do drugs. I have 4 kids 17-15-8 and two months, single mom two honor roll kids. Pls, I know its a long story. Pls, I need your advice for 2015 to be a better year. I'm always afraid to go to interview I feel they would Know and don't know if they will believe my story. My life is over.

Help



Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?


Hello,
I am not a legal professional, but to my knowledge, the State of New York allows for the sealing of certain convictions under certain circumstances.  I suggest that you speak to a legal professional about this for a more definitive answer.

You can contact the Legal Action Center for more information.  You can reach them here:
http://lac.org/index.php/lac/legal_services

For those outside of New Your state, I suggest contacting you local legal aid office.  There you can get information on expungement. sealing of records and Certificates of Rehabilitation in your state.  You may even qualify for low-cost or even no cost assistance.

Since you want to be a nurse, you will need to be licensed by the state and your record will come up.  Don't give up hope.  In the state of New York, you may be eligible for a Certificate of Relief from Disabilities or Certificate of Good Conduct.  These certificates serve as proof to the state that ex-offenders and felons have been rehabilitated and may help you to be licensed.

 Take a few minutes and look at the videos below.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: What Are Certificates, and Who Should Apply?



Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: How to Apply for a Certificate of Relief

 

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: How to Apply for a Certificate of Good Conduct


 I hope this helps and best of luck to you.

Eric Mayo

 

Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


  Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?

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Friday, July 6, 2018

How legislation can help ex-prisoners find employment



How legislation can help ex-prisoners find employment

The upsurge in the ex-prisoner population, along with employment and economic output losses, overwhelmingly reflects changes that have taken place in the U.S. criminal justice system over the years, not changes in underlying criminal activity. 

Legislation like the Clean Slate bill keeps ex-prisoners out of the correctional system, minimizing costly recidivism rates and enhancing public safety

By Dr. Michael Pittaro, Faculty Member, Criminal Justice at American Military University

In 2008, I published an article, “Prisoner Reintegration Challenges of Assimilation and Crime Desistance,” that focused on the challenges ex-prisoners face after release. Unfortunately, what I stated in 2008 still holds true today. Confronted with uncertainty, animosity, and a multitude of personal, social and legal barriers, most prisoners reenter society with the lifelong stigma of being an ex-prisoner and cannot fully assimilate into society.
The process of “going straight,” which criminologists refer to as desistance from crime, is multifaceted, yet attainable. While it’s possible, it is often very difficult for ex-prisoners to obtain and maintain employment.  More needs to be done to help ex-offenders find work especially since gainful employment is critical for successful reintegration, reducing recidivism rates, and cultivating public safety.
WHY IT’S IMPORTANT TO HELP OFFENDERS FIND EMPLOYMENT
The United States Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that nearly 95 percent of all state prisoners will be released back into the community at some point, whether it is tomorrow or 40 years from today. This suggests that only a mere 5 percent of all state prisoners are serving death sentences or life without the possibility of parole, and an even smaller percentage will die in prison while serving out their respective sentences.
However, ex-offenders are likely to have a very difficult time finding employment. A 2010 Center for Economic and Policy Research report noted that a prison record greatly reduces an ex-prisoner’s prospect of garnering employment. Even at the relatively low productivity rates of ex-prisoners (they typically have less formal education than the average worker), the resulting loss of economic output in the United States is estimated to be between $57 and $65 billion.
The upsurge in the ex-prisoner population, along with employment and economic output losses, overwhelmingly reflects changes that have taken place in the U.S. criminal justice system over the years, not changes in underlying criminal activity. The dramatic increases in sentencing time, especially for drug-related offenses, partly accounts for the spike in the ex-prisoner population. Therefore, changes in both employment and sentencing laws can have a positive impact on the U.S. economy while simultaneously reducing overall recidivism rates and improving public safety. These changes are of significant importance for African Americans. The NAACP reports that African Americans comprise 14 percent of the U.S. population, but disproportionately represent 40 percent of the nation’s prison population.

LEGISLATION INITIATIVES TO AID EX-OFFENDERS

One promising legislative initiative that is gaining in popularity is referred to as the "Clean Slate" bill. The intent of the legislation is to seal the criminal records of low-level, non-violent ex-offenders who go 10 consecutive years without another criminal conviction. The legislation will also seal the records of arrests that did not result in convictions.
The Clean Slate bill has received widespread bipartisan support. In early June 2018, it passed the Pennsylvania Senate unanimously after receiving House approval with only two "no" votes. On June 28, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf signed it into law. In addition to increasing employment prospects, the law will also improve and increase housing and educational opportunities for ex-offenders.
Another initiative gaining momentum with the blessing of bipartisan support is known as “ban the box” or “fair chance policy.” This particular initiative affords applicants a fair chance at employment by removing the conviction history question from job applications and delaying background checks until later in the hiring process.
A 2018 National Employment Law Project publication reported that, as of June 2018, 31 states, the District of Columbia, and more than 150 cities and counties have adopted “ban the box” policies in which employers consider a job candidate’s qualifications first, without the stigma of a conviction or an arrest record.
The report also noted that delaying records-related inquiries until after a conditional offer of employment ensures a fairer decision-making process. It requires employers to consider the job-relatedness of a conviction, time passed, and mitigating circumstances or rehabilitation evidence. Granted, in some cases, it might just simply delay the inevitable in the form of a rejection letter, but remember that this policy is primarily intended to assist low-level, non-violent ex-offenders (namely drug offenders) in obtaining employment, a key protective factor in combating recidivism.
Other promising initiatives include the Federal Work Opportunity Tax Credit Program, which allows a company to claim a tax credit of up to $2,400 for hiring an employee with a felony conviction within one year of the date of his or her conviction or release from incarceration. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Labor offers a free bonding program for “at-risk” job applicants, including people with criminal records, indemnifying employees for loss of money or property due to an employee’s dishonesty or theft.
Such laws are beneficial for ex-offenders and the community. Not only do they help ex-offenders obtain gainful employment to help them successfully reintegrate into society, these measures also provide ex-offenders with a renewed sense of purpose and identity that many lack after their release. By keeping them out of the correctional system, these laws also help minimize costly recidivism rates and contribute to enhanced public safety.

companies that hire felons


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)



companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

Eric Mayo

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Tuesday, July 3, 2018

Felon is looking for training and a career

Felon is looking for training and a career



Hello,

I am Allison, 29 yo, from southern CA.

My concern:

September 2011, I was charged with grand theft in the amount of $30,000 and as result I have a felony and must complete 5 years of felony probation. The actual crime occurred 8 years prior in 2003, at the age of 20. Characteristically, I don't even vaguely resemble the young person that I was then. I feel like I'm stuck working in a job that has no benefits, opportunities, or room for enhancement.

I was scheduled to begin classes this year for respiratory therapy, but the board does not allow felon participants because I will not be able to obtain state certification here in CA. Furthermore, as a convicted felon, I don't meet criteria to receive federally funded financial aid to attend any 2 year college.

I make $11 an hour and can't afford to pay for classes with my limited income.. I feel like giving up because I just don't know how to turn this around. The DA is willing to reduce it to a misdemeanor in 2 years and can be expunged after the $30,000 fine has been satisfied, but realistically, that may never happen.

In the meantime, I don't know what to do. I have an 8 yo son and I want to provide him with life beyond the necessities. I just don't know how or even where to begin.

Can you help me manage my life and come up with a plan, please?


Kindly,

Allison

 

Felon is looking for training and a career



Felon is looking for training and a career
Hello Allison,

Despite what you may consider a bleak situation, you are better off than most ex-offenders and felons...you have a job. You may not qualify for federal educational funding but you may qualify for occupational training funded by your state.  This training could very well be the start of a new career.  You can get more information from the state Dept. of Labor.  There is a Dept. of Labor representative at your local One-stop Career Center

As I suggest to most ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, make a visit to your local One-stop Career Center. This is a really underutilized resource. Each state has a network of centers that provide an assortment of free services that can help you in getting a job. In addition, these centers provide a long list of services that can help people get jobs and even train them for new careers. Some services available are:

Career planning and counseling

Workshops (Resume Writing, Interviewing Skills, and related topics.)

Computers with internet access and word processing

Daily access to thousands of job listings

Job-related magazines and local newspapers

Job postings and referrals

Printers, fax machines, phones, and copiers for job search use

Each center has trained counselors that provide one-on-one assistance. Many of them have experience assisting ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs. You can find the One-stop Career Center nearest you at:

www.servicelocator.org




Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon is looking for training and a career

Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)



Felon is looking for training and a career



companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons | Career Training for Felons

Read More