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Showing posts with label felon job. Show all posts
Showing posts with label felon job. Show all posts

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start

Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start



Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start
President Trump's State of the Union address highlights that being tough on crime is
perfectly  compatible with wanting individuals with records to find work and become
independent instead of falling into government dependency. 
by , Washington Examiner

In his 2018 State of the Union address, President Trump said that “we will embark on reforming our prisons to help former inmates who have served their time get a second chance.”

This sentiment directly follows what Trump promised during his inaugural address, that “we will get our people off of welfare and back to work.” People coming out of incarceration face two distinct paths—they can either find a job, or they will fall into government dependency. Beyond being the main predictor of whether someone is living in poverty, not having a job is the clearest indicator of how likely someone is to re-offend.

Yet one year after their release from incarceration, between 60 percent and 75 percent of ex-offenders remain unemployed. Rather than promoting rehabilitation and independence, states across the country severely limit the work prospects of ex-offenders through occupational licensing laws.

Most states have little oversight over how licensing agencies can treat those with criminal records, meaning agencies can consider old convictions or convictions that are unrelated to the occupation. Even worse, boards can require that applicants meet vague standards such as having “good character” or not showing “moral turpitude.” These unclear requirements give licensing boards broad discretion to prevent ex-offenders from getting work.

With the devastating opioid crisis leaving tens of thousands of individuals across the country with records, vague standards that allow boards to judge applicants’ character can serve as a major obstacle for those recovering from addiction who are seeking work in licensed occupations. Because work is a core component of recovery and has the largest positive effect of any indicator on overcoming drug addiction, states should be promoting work for these individuals, not adding barriers to recovery.

Given that there are 2.3 million people incarcerated in America—at least 95 percent of whom, or 600,000 people each year, will re-enter the general population at some point—excessive licensing regulations for those with records pose a major problem to people like Texas resident Christopher Owen.

After finding work at a home security company, Owen was denied a fire alarm installer license because of a felony burglary on his record. His offense? He had stolen a $5 pair of socks from a Goodwill drop-off trailer in 2014. This incident happened right after Owen’s home had burned down and his mother had passed away. In a brief period, he had gone from owning his own oil and gas company to being homeless. Yet none of these mitigating circumstances were considered by the Texas Department of Public Safety. A crime of $5 cost Owen a career.

There are countless other stories similar to Owen’s—each more unbelievable than the last. Perhaps the least-defensible example of overreach from licensing authorities can be found in Calvert County, Md., where a misdemeanor or a felony can automatically disqualify someone from working as a licensed fortune-teller. Many of these licensing restrictions have nothing to do with protecting public safety. And paradoxically, research has shown that broad licensing restrictions against ex-offenders endanger the public more than they protect it.

Thankfully, states are acting to lower the barriers faced by those with records. Florida State Sen. Jeff Brandes and State Rep. Scott Plakon (both Republicans) introduced a bill that would allow those in prison to apply for licenses before their release date. The reform also allows those with records to petition licensing boards to ensure that they will be approved before they invest substantial amounts of time completing government-required training. And boards for certain occupations will no longer be able to consider convictions from more than five years ago, which will no doubt help the thousands of people recovering from opioid addictions and related offenses move on from their pasts.

In Nebraska, State Sen. Laura Ebke (a Libertarian) introduced a comprehensive licensing reform bill making clear that criminal histories alone should not disqualify people from work. If this bill becomes law, Nebraska boards will no longer be allowed to consider offenses that are unrelated to safely working in a licensed occupation. This highlights another kind of overreach where licensing boards impose blanket bans, which are occupational bans for any kind of felony or misdemeanor, even when the offense is unrelated to the job. One example of this can be found in Nebraska, where those with any criminal record can be denied a massage therapy license. Similar bills to get rid of blanket bans are moving through the legislatures in Wisconsin, the District of Columbia, and New Hampshire.

President Trump’s State of the Union address highlights that being tough on crime is perfectly compatible with wanting individuals with records to find work and become independent instead of falling into government dependency, whether through welfare or re-incarceration. Work keeps ex-offenders out of poverty, allows them to gain valuable skills and experience, moves them off welfare, and helps them avoid reoffending—those are more than enough reasons for states to give them a chance at a fresh start.

Jared Meyer (@JaredMeyer10) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner's Beltway Confidential blog. He is a senior research fellow at the Foundation for Government Accountability.


Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start



How to get a job with a criminal record




Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Donald Trump | Trump


Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start


Eric Mayo

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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job

 Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job


 Veteran is a Felon Looking for a JobGood morning,

My name is Irene and I am a veteran and a convicted felon. My thing is that I was in so much trouble in my past until I'm scared to apply for a job thinking I have something outstanding out there. I'm too afraid to go get a back ground check knowing if it's something out standing they will take me in custody. I have a military back ground which consists of administrative work and I'm a certified medical assistant. My criminal background consist of fraud and I've always assumed no one will hire me. I'm 37 years old and I am no longer that person I was back then.

Please if you can, can you give me some advice.

Thanks


Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job



Hello Irene,

First of all, I teach all of my students to apply for every job they feel that they qualify for.  If you apply for a job, you may get it or you may not.  If you do not apply for it, you definitely will not.  Never disqualify yourself from a job.  Finding a job is a numbers game.  The more jobs you apply for, the more jobs you are in the running for.  Ex-offenders and felons get hired everyday.  The reason they get hired is they don't let the fact that they have criminal records hold them back.

You are a veteran.  There are many services available for veterans looking for jobs.  There are also tax incentives for employers who hire veterans.  Below is the link to the government sit where you will find valuable resources that can help veterans such as yourself.



I hope this helps.

 Eric Mayo

Jobs for Felons: Most Vets Aren't Aware of Their VA Benefits


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job

Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!



Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Jobs for Veterans

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Tuesday, February 21, 2017

Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons Make

 Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons Make 



Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons make

Germantown nonprofit offers ex-offenders

temporary jobs recycling electronics

Ex-offenders and felons,  know how difficult it is to get a job interview.  After properly filling out application after application including the dreaded "Have you ever been convicted of a crime.....?" question and you got an interview.  There are too many people who blow the opportunity to get jobs by making costly mistakes.  Make the most out your next opportunity by avoiding these top five mistakes made by ex-offenders and felons.





1.  Being Late - There is absolutely no excuse for being late to an interview.  To the interviewer, if you are late to the interview, you'll be late for work.  Everyone know that things happen.  Murphy's law is always in effect.  Sometimes thing go wrong.  Being organized is the best way to keep on schedule.  Find out where your interview is and know exactly how long it will take you to get there.  If you have never been there, I strongly suggest you go there a day or so before the interview just to see how long it will take to get there.  Once you know how long it will take, plan to get there at least 15 minutes early.

2.  Dress Inappropriately - An interview is a business meeting.  Does your clothing make you look more like an ex-offender or a businessman?  Proper clothing will be the difference between being hired and not being hired.  Whatever you have to do, get the right clothing.  Remember, you will never get a second chance to make a first impression.

3.  Talking Too Much - Employment interviews should not be used to tell your life story or ramble on about mistakes you have made in the past.  Just remember "TMI," too much information. Too often when folks are nervous, and interviews do make people nervous, they talk too much.  Never talk about personal situations, habits, or relationships.  Be friendly but never tell more than anyone needs to know.  Particularly avoid conversations about religious beliefs, politics, or sex.  If questioned about your convictions, briefly answer questions without going into detail.  Make reference to the amount of time that has gone by and what you have learned from your experience.  Also talk about the progress you have made and the things you have done to make yourself better.

4.  Using Slang or Profanity - As stated before, the interview is a business meeting between two professionals.  You must be professional at all times. There is absolutely no place for slang or profanity here.

5.  Not Turning off Your Cell Phone - Cell phones are a great convenience but they have no place on an interview.  Turning off your phone allows you to focus on your interview and will eliminate the possibility of the rude interruption of  it ringing.

Ex-offenders and felons have a difficult time finding employers who will consider them for jobs.  When interviews do come, avoid ruining these opportunities with these critical mistakes and get hired.

Take a few minutes to get more great information from the videos below that can give you a huge advantage at your next interview.

  Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons make 

 


These are some great tips along with some things felons should avoid at their next interview opportunity

Getting an interview is a great opportunity that felons must take full advantage of.  Too many people make mistakes that ruin their chances to get jobs.  Unfortunately, some people do not know that they are making mistakes.



Learn from Human Resources professional what the most common interview mistakes are and how to avoid them on your next interview.  pt 1


Learn from Human Resources professional what the most common interview mistakes are and how to avoid them on your next interview.  pt 2


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Jobs for Felons: Five Things that get Ex-offenders and Felons Jobs

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

 Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons make


 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Interview

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Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Female Felon needs a Job

Female Felon needs a Job

 

Why female ex-convicts may have a harder
 time finding work than their male counterparts
Hello.

I want to first thank you from the bottom of my heart for doing this site.
I am on probation for a class D felony (promoting prostitution). I would like to get a bachelor's degree in business administration. I can't stand on my legs for long periods of time because I have severe back problems and fibromyalgia. I suffer from chronic pain but I would still like to work. I got baptized in jail and I want a decent life and a good job. My question is: I am 46 years, do you think a company will want to hire me at my age with a felony on my record?

Sue,
 



 Female Felon needs a Job




Hello Sue

Often the felon job search begins with a little legal assistance. I suggest you contact your
local legal aid office to see if expungement is an option for you in your state. Legal aid could offer low-cost or no-cost assistance in this process. It will make getting a job a lot easier.

Next contact your local One-stop Career Center. The local One-stop is a full service employment center offering a wide variety of services including job placement to residents.  There are computers, resume assistance and trained counselors that could assist you in your job search.  Many counselors have experience working with felons.  You may qualify for funding that could train you for a new career.  You can find your local One-stop Career Center here:

www.servicelocator.org


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Female Felon needs a Job
Finally contact the United Way in your area.
The United Way supports a large number of community organizations and could point you the direction of one that could use your skills.  They could also put you in contact with women's advocacy groups that may assist you in other ways.
 

I hope this helps.


Companies that Hire Ex-offenders and Felons

Female Felon needs a Job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Female Felon needs a Job

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Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Felon wants Job as Flight Attendant

 Felon wants Job as Flight Attendant

http://www.howfelonscangetjobs.com
Hello sir,

I was reading your list of companies that hire felons, and noticed that there were airlines listed.  I wanted to ask you about a person with a criminal record becoming a flight attendant.  I have a lot of customer service experience and people like me.  It seems like a good job for a young person like me.  Do you know anything about that?

I have a shoplifting charge.  I hope having one charge won't keep me from having a good career career.

Dara


Felon wants Job as Flight Attendant



Hello Dara,

Felon wants Job as Flight AttendantI know of people with criminal records working for airlines.  Many people believe that having a record prevents anyone from working at an airline and that is not true.  The job applied for and the nature of the criminal offense will always be taken in account.

My suggestion to you, is to contact the airline you were thinking of applying to and speak to the human resources department.  That department will be able to tell you if your conviction will prohibit you from being hired in that position.  If not, you can find out what the exact qualifications for the positions are and exactly how to apply.  Remind the Human Resources representative that you can be bonded.  See this post about the Federal Bonding Program here:

Federal Bonding Program can help felon get a job


 Eric Mayo

 Jobs for Felons: Know your Right Regarding Background Checks

Jobs for Felons:  The Truth about Background Checks



 Felon wants Job as Flight Attendant

Felon wants Job as Flight Attendant

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Monday, August 8, 2016

Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview
Hello Sir,

I have a job interview next week and I am very nervous about it.  I have an interview for a job as a clerk in a title office.  I have done this kind of work before but not since my legal troubles.  I was involved with a guy who was selling drugs.  There were some in my apartment when he was arrested.  Because the lease was in my name, I was charged with possession. I wasn't selling but I was charged anyway.  I know this will come up on a background check.  

Do you think I have a chance to get this job?

Candy


  Felon is Nervous about Job Interview


Hi Candy,

You don't know how often I hear stories like this.  Too many people get dragged down by people around them and often there are lasting effects.  I'm not going into a lecture about choosing better friends, but you knew he was selling, and there are certain risks involved associating with people and their criminal activities.

Hopefully you were honest on your application and you got an interview anyway.  If that is the case,
 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview
somewhere in the interview, the question is going to come up. You can handle it in three steps.

Own your Mistake - Never blame anyone else for your mistake.  Acknowledge your role in your troubles.  You could start by saying something like this, "I'm glad you asked me that because I want you to feel comfortable about hiring me. I’ll be honest with you because you have the right to know.  I have been in trouble but it didn’t have anything to do with any of my previous employers.  I was involved with someone who was into some bad things and I was arrested along with him.  I am proud to say that I have put that all behind me.

Focus on the Positive - Shift the conversation away from your problem and on to the things you have done to improve yourself and how you now only associate with people who are doing positive things.  Talk about what you have learned through this bad experience.

Talk about your Goals - Without being specific, tell the interviewer that you have goals and this job will help you put your mistake behind you.

Sell your Skills - Talk about your skills, training, education and how they make you an ideal candidate for the job.

Don't forget to be personable and friendly.  Get the interviewer to focus on your skills and personality instead of the fact that have a criminal record.  Stick to the formula above and you will do well.  Remind the interviewer that you can be bonded.  Get information about the Federal Bonding Program and how it can help felons get jobs here:

The Federal Bonding Program

There also may be financial benefits to employers that may also be a selling point.  The Work Opportunity Tax Credit offers tax incentives to employers who hire felons under certain conditions.  You can find out more about it here:


Best of luck to you!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal record


Jobs for Felons: 12 Job Interview Tips




Eric Mayo


 

Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons Make

http://www.jailtojob.com/companies-hire-felons.html

  Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

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Monday, August 1, 2016

Felon wants a Career not Just a Job

Felon wants a Career not Just a Job

Felon wants a Career not Just a Job
Hi,

I am a twenty six year old man who was released from prison in September for a violent felony.  As soon as I was released, I gained employment in a restaurant, I would love to try to find a real career someday, I am starting college again this month, I have thought about becoming a physical therapist, or counselor, I have received advice from many different people, some of which say I would be a great counselor or this or that, but I need to know if it is possible to gain employment in these fields with a felony, I am willing to relocate after I am finished with school, and plan on staying employed at the job I work. Should I continue my pursuit for one of these jobs or just try to find a trade like welding or electrician? Thank you for your help.



Felon wants a Career not Just a Job


First of all, let me say that it is great to see that you are not letting your past dictate your future.  It is easy for a felon to give up without trying.  You have many options and considerations.  Let me start with careers in physical therapy or counseling.  The only consideration is, do either require licensing and would your conviction prevent it.


Having a trade is always an attractive option for ex-offenders and felons.  Who would care about your record if you were good at what you do.  Having a trade, you could work for a contractor or for yourself.

As far as pursuing a professional career, your major concern would be if it require any special license or certification.  If not, I suggest you apply for every job you feel qualified for.  There are companies that will hire a felon.  Your challenge will be to find them.  The only way to do this is to not limit yourself and apply just like you didn't have a record.  If the question of your background comes up, be honest but focus on your education and positive qualities.  

You also have an idea of what to takes to work in a restaurant, so don't rule out the culinary arts as a career.

If you do pursue a job,  please do not forget The Federal Bonding Program as a useful tool.  Check out the video below.

Remember, never exclude yourself from any opportunity to get a job. 

Jobs for Felons: The Federal Bonding Program





Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where Ex-offenders and Felons Can Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal record

 
Felon wants a Career not Just a Job

 

  Felon wants a Career not Just a Job

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Friday, July 29, 2016

Ex-offenders, Felons, Expungement and Jobs

Ex-offenders, Felons, Expungement and Jobs


Ex-offenders, Felons, Expungement and Jobs
I get a lot of questions from ex-offenders and felons regarding expungement.  It is a common belief that getting an expungement is the answer to their employment woes.  Some believe that if they can only get one, they can have their criminal record erased and they can get jobs to move on with their
Ex-offenders, Felons, Expungement and Jobs lives.  There are lawyers who make lots of money from felons and their families hoping to have some miracle worked and their records will gone forever.  Since most employers do background checks, having a clean record will make getting a job easier.  Having certain convictions on your record may be the difference between getting hired for a job or not.  Lets explore some common myths and uncover the facts about expungement.


Myth #1:  Criminal Records are Automatically Erased After a Certain Number of Years


I am not aware of any state that erases records after automatically.  In fact no records are ever removed, they may be made inaccessible to the public.  There must be legal action taken if there any sealing of records.  There is an application process that completed for any type of action to be considered.  Nothing happens automatically.

Myth #2:  Any Records can be Expunged


Expungement is a legal process that not available in all states.  These processes will vary from state to state as to which records can be sealed or expunged.  For example, in NJ where I am, only one felony can be expunged and the waiting period is ten years from the completion of the sentence.  In some states no records can expunged and in others only arrests not convictions can be sealed.

Myth #3:  An Attorney is not Needed 


Never attempt any legal procedure by yourself.  To be certain that any legal  process is done properly, You should always seek the help of a qualified  professional with experience in this field.

Myth #4:  Federal Convictions can be Expunged


Federal convictions can in no way shape or form be expunged or sealed.  The only action that can be taken is to seek a presidential pardon and very few are granted. 


Myth #5:  Expungement Erases Criminal Records


With expungement, sealing or any other process, records will never be erased or destroyed.  Even though certain records will be hidden from the public, they will always be visible to the court system, government agencies and law enforcement.



Ex-offenders, Felons, Expungement and Jobs
This a brief list of common myths associated with the the expungement or sealing of recordsBear in mind that these processes are not available in every state.  Every state has its own statutes regarding the treatment of criminal records.  If you are interested in finding out if you are a candidate for expungement, I suggest speaking to an attorney about availability in your state.  I also suggest that you contact your local legal aid office where you may qualify for free advice about this or even help getting it done.  Most legal aid offices are staffed by young attorneys who are anxious to help and gain valuable experience.  To find your local legal aid office, check your telephone directory or contact the bar association in your state.


Jobs for Felons: Understanding How Employers Analyze Your Records

Jobs for Felons: Expungement - A Way to Erase Your Criminal Record

Jobs for Felons: Criminal Record Expungement & Federal Pardons 



Ex-offenders, Felons, Expungement and Jobs


Ex-offenders, Felons, Expungement and Jobs

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Wednesday, June 8, 2016

Felon has serious conviction and needs job search help

Felon has serious conviction and needs job search help


Felon has serious conviction and needs job search help
Hello Mr. Mayo,

I love reading your blog.  Thank you for this information.  I have been looking for a job but I have a very serious charge and it is making it very hard for me to get a job.  In 2002, I got into a fight with a guy.  I didn't start it but the guy got beat up pretty bad and later died.  I was charged with assault and involuntary manslaughter.  I have done my time but I feel that this black mark is keeping me from getting a job.

I am not a violent person but this thing makes me look like a monster.  What can I do?

Henry

 Felon has serious conviction and needs job search help



Hello Henry,

That is quite a story.  It's unfortunate that hings turned out the way they did.  It certainly could have been a lot worse.  You could have been the other guy.  Your charge is serious but it is not the end of the world.  I work with ex-offenders and felons everyday and I have had students with similar felonies and they are working to this day.  To employers, theft, robbery and other crimes involving integrity are looked down far more than offenses like yours.

When you apply for jobs you should respond to the "Have you been convicted of a crime..." question this way.  When answering this question you must list four things.  You must list the location of the conviction (County, State,) the conviction, the date of the conviction and the disposition ( final outcome.)  It should look
Felon has serious conviction and needs job search help
like this:

Cook County, Illinois,   Involuntary Manslaughter (Isolated Incident,) June 2005, Time served, 13 years.

Notice the notation after the conviction "Isolated Incident."  This tells the employer that this was something that was not planned, it was circumstantial. You will be surprised how well this works.  When you get an interview, the charge will probably come up.  You should begin your explanation of the incident with "I'm glad you asked that question because I want you to be comfortable hiring me......."  then, most humbly explain what happened.

I tell every felon I work with that finding a job is a numbers game.  The more jobs you apply for, the more interviews you will get.  The more interviews you get, the more opportunities you will get to get hired.  Apply for every job you feel you qualify for.  Never eliminate yourself by not applying.


Please Rate This Post at the Top!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where Ex-offenders and Felons Can Find Jobs

Jobs for Felons: What Employers want on Applications

Jobs for Felons:3 Most Common Mistakes Made on an Employment Application


Are you a felon or ex-offender who has a question about finding a job with a criminal record? You could have your question answered right here.  Email your question to: BelievePublications@comcast.net.

If you are really serious about getting a job or you want to help someone you care about get a job, check out this link: From Jail to a Job

 

Felon has serious conviction and needs job search help

   
From Jail to a Job

Felon has serious conviction and needs job search help

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Monday, August 17, 2015

Felon in North Carolina looking for Job

Felon in North Carolina looking for Job



Felon in North Carolina looking for Job
Hello,

My name is Dylan and I am a two time felon. I have to 3rd degree burglary charges under my belt from 2004-2005 in New Jersey. I moved to North Carolina after Sandy hit the entire state of New Jersey. It is very hard to find work. I can not even get hired at the local McDonald's or other low entry level jobs. I feel like I am at the end of my rope. I have been out of trouble for so many years and still paying for my mistakes today. I feel hopeless. I can't provide for myself let alone for someone else.

I am 27 years old and I just want my life to start. I will take any kind of job but it seems that no one will take a chance on me. I currently live with a friend who has been taking care of me and supporting me. He is falling behind on his bills because of it. I am out of options. I am in a new state where I do not now anyone. No family or friends in the area and no one to help. I am desperately asking you for any help that you can give me.. I live in High Point, North Carolina. I have been rejected from everywhere over and over. Even from temp agencies. I do not know what else to do.

Please help!

 

Felon in North Carolina looking for Job


Hello Dylan,

I'm sorry you are having so much trouble.  I am in New Jersey, and yes Sandy did a lot of damage here.   The very first thing I suggest to every ex-offender and felon looking for jobs is to go to your local One-stop Career Center.  There you will find a number of great resources that can help you find a job or even a
Felon in North Carolina looking for Job
career.  If you need a resume, you can get help getting one.  If you need interview skills, you can get help.  There are also lists of open positions in your area.  In addition, you will find counselors that can give you employment assistance.  Often the counselors know of employers who have hired ex-offenders and felons in the past.

You can find the office in High Point below:

High Point JobLink Career Center
 607 Idol Street
High Point, NC 27262


You say you have applied for temporary employment.  There is a trick to apply for temporary jobs.   The trick is to apply at small independent agencies.  Smaller agencies are a better choice than larger, nationally known ones. Independent agencies are free to hire anyone they choose and are more likely to hire ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs.  You may find some in your local telephone directory.  Apply to them as you would any other employer.

Take a look at the video below.






Jobs for felons: Working as a Temporary Employee



Jobs for Felons: How to Find Hidden Jobs



Please Rate This Post at the Top!

Felon in North Carolina looking for Job

 
http://www.jailtojob.com/from-jail-job.html

Felon in North Carolina looking for Job

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Monday, August 3, 2015

Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use

Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use



Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use
Ex-offenders and felons have a very tough time finding jobs and even getting interviews.  That's no secret, so when an interview finally comes, they should put themselves in the best possible position to get hired.  While we all know that the applicant wants the job, the interviewer has a responsibility to hire the best person available.

In my career that spans more than thirty years, I have have seen and used a number of tricks that interviewers use to get through all of the rehearsing and other things applicants use to put themselves in the best light.  These tricks are used to make applicants reveal who the really are.  Often these tricks go unnoticed. I am going to share with you my all time favorite interviewer tricks.

1.  The Waiting Game - I have seen applicants been made to wait up to an hour to be interviewed.  What I have learned is that the longer people wait, the more they become themselves.  The combination of nerves and aggravation will reveal true personalities.  Whether it is using bad language, complaining, or engaging in inappropriate conversation, this is a true test.  I have even seen applicants flirt with the receptionist, employees and other applicants thus exposing parts of their character.  No matter how long you have to wait, stay professional at all times.

2.  Just One of the Guys - Some interviewers will present themselves as really friendly types that throw formality out of the window.  This often will make the applicant relax (sometimes too much,) which causes them to let their guards down.  When guards come down, things slip out.  I teach my students never to reveal too much information especially about their criminal backgrounds or other errors in judgement.  Never offer information that isn't asked. The interview is not the place to tell your life story or talk about all of mistakes you have made in your life.  Never talk about personal problems, habits, or relationships issues.  Be personable but never tell more than anyone needs to know.  Never talk about to religion, politics, or sex.  Even If the interviewer brings them subjects up, these are not discussions you want to get into.  Never, ever use slang or profanity.

3.  The Big Squeeze -  This neat little trick I use to when I ask applicants into my office. I stand partially in the doorway, forcing the other person turn sideways to squeeze by.  In the few seconds it takes to squeeze by, I get a lot of information.  I can get a hint about the individual's personal hygiene, if they have smoked recently or even taken a drink.  Many employers shy away from hiring smokers.  Smokers require more breaks than non-smokers.  Smokers have more health problems than non-smokers.  If you do smoke, do not smoke before your interview.  If you have alcohol on your breath, forget it!

4.  Hold up! Don't sit down! -  To many people, respect and manners count for a lot and some interviewers will test this a number of ways.  My favorite is sitting down and waiting to see what the applicant does.  My office is like my house.  If he sits down without being invited, it may be because he lacks social graces or he is simply disrespectful.  When you get to the interview area, always wait until the interviewer asks you to be seated.  If he doesn’t offer, politely ask “May I sit?”  Never touch the interviewer’s desk or put anything on it.

5.  Butter Fingers -  Another one of my favorite personality revealers is very subtle but it tells a lot.  I may drop a pen or other small object.  If the applicant picks it up, more than likely, the person is a caring, helpful individual.  If he doesn't, it usually means he cares only about himself.


 Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons make 



The next five are not really tricks, but they are clever ways  interviewers weed out applicants with questions.

6.   Have you Done Your Homework? -  Often interviewers ask "What do you know about our company?"  Interviewers ask this because they want to know if you are serious about working with them. If you haven't prepared for the interview by doing some research on the company, it will show.


It would appear that you are very interested in the job just by doing some research.  Some things you should find out:

How old is the company.

Number of locations

Number of employees

What the company business

Who is the competition?

If it is a large company, you may find this information on the internet or the library.  If you are interviewing with a small local business, you may get the information from the receptionist if you call.



7.  Money, Money, Money -  "How much money are you looking for?"  This is a tricky question that is used to disqualify applicants.  It's tricky because if you give a dollar amount that is too low, you may be paid less than others doing the same job.  If you give an amount that is too high, you may disqualify yourself.  I teach my students to never talk about money until someone offers them a job.  So, the response may be "Are you offering me this job?"  Whether the answer is yes or no, the response should be something like this, "I want to be paid fairly.  I know you will make me a fair offer."    If that answer is not enough, remember no dollar amounts, you should answer, "I want as much as you can afford to pay me."

8.  I'm Feeling Weak - We all have gotten the question, "What is your greatest strength?" and we pretty much know how to handle that one.  People have a a lot of trouble with the follow question which is sure to follow- "What is your biggest weakness?"  Most people blow that one because they forget that the interview is used to sell yourself.  With that in mind, do you think I would be foolish enough to tell you about a real fault of mine that might cost me the opportunity to get a job?  Interviewers count on it!  Every has weaknesses, but don't not tell the interviewer anything that can be used against you.  There are two ways to handle this.  You can present a strength you have as a weakness or you can offer a technical weakness as long as it has nothing to do with the job.  You might say "I get really upset at myself when I don't finish everything on time." It looks like a weakness, but it come across really well because it tells how important it is for you to finish thing promptly.   The second option is to offer a technical weakness (as long as it has nothing to do with the job."  It may sound like this, "I want to brush up on my writing skills.  I write ok, but I want to get better."

9.  Bossy, Bossy - This question is used to spot a troublemaker and it works every time, "Tell me about the worst boss you've ever had?" Under no circumstances should you ever say anything negative about any past job or supervisor.  To an interviewer, only a troublemaker would speak ill of former job or company. In the mind of the interviewer, you were a problem.  That's why you are no longer there.   It's ok to quit a job or even get fired and there are positive ways to explain even a not so great situation.  You might say something like.  "I have had bosses, some better than others.  I have learned something from all of them even if it is what not to do."

10. I have a Question - The final one is a question that is not tricky at all, but an interviewer can find out a lot about what on an applicant's mind with it.    "Do you have any questions for me?"  I am amazed how often applicants answer "no" to this question.  By answering "no" job searchers pass up a golden opportunity to finish off on an extremely high note.  Some really great questions are:



Why is this position open?

What are the day to day duties of this position?

 hat are some of the more difficult problems one would have to face in this job?

What are the opportunities for advancement?

Did you know I can be bonded?  (Federal Bonding Program)

By asking questions like these the interviewer will get the impression that you are interested in more than just a paycheck, which looks really good.


Ex-offenders and felons have a tough time getting interviews so when they come, they have to make them count.  These are some clever tricks that a seasoned interviewer would use to find out more about the person sitting in front of them than what they are saying.  Now you will recognize them when you encounter them and make them work to your advantage!

Best of luck on your interview!


Jobs for Felons: Dirty Little Tricks Interviewers Use




  Jobs for Felons: Preparing to ace the Interview

Jobs for ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs : What to wear to the interview






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Are you an ex-offender or felon who has a question about finding a job with a criminal record?  I have been helping ex-offenders and felons get jobs for over ten years and I feel I have an understanding of what works. I will be updating this blog often. I will answer specific questions relating to getting a job with a criminal record on this blog so feel free to send me your questions.   The right information could help felons get jobs.  You could have your question answered right here. Email your question to: BelievePublications@comcast.net.


If you are a felon and really serious about getting a job or you want to help someone you care about get a job, check out this link: From Jail to a Job 




Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use


Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use

Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use

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Saturday, January 24, 2015

Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts

 Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts



 Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts
Hi Mr. Mayo,

My fiance is up for parole in March 2014.  His family and I are trying to find job leads and scholarship programs that will help him once he is released. He has good behavior in prison and has held a job in the prison kitchen. All this will look good to the parole board.  He is an excellent artist and wants to be a graphic artist and also learn computer animation.

He was convicted of robbery and possession of a weapon while committing a felony.  He was 18 at the time and has done six years if a 12 year sentence.  He has an excellent chance of parole if can prove he has some type of direction and goals.  What I want to know is, where can he get an education in graphics that he wants and can he get any type of scholarships or grants to do what he wants to do?  How can he do this?  What does he have to do?  I know that if he can get paroled, he will prove that he is not that same person that committed that crime when he was a kid.

Please help,

Katy

Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts


Hello Katy,

 Felon wants a Career in Graphic ArtsYour fiance seems to have a good support system that he will need when he is paroled.  As far a him pursuing a career in graphics, I suggest first contacting your local community college.  Community colleges are not just for degrees anymore.  Many community colleges these days offer career training for growing
occupations.

Speak to the financial aid office at whatever college you look into.  They will be able to tell you which financial aid programs if any, your fiance may qualify for and how to apply.  It is in their best interest to give you good information.  If your local college does not offer the courses he is looking for, they will tell you who does.

Best of luck to you both.




Eric Mayo

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 Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts

 Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts

Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts

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Wednesday, July 2, 2014

Felon in Florida in Need of a Job

Felon in Florida in Need of a Job


Felon in Florida in Need of a Job
Hello Mr. Mayo,

I have been reading your blog, but I see nothing about getting a job in Florida.  It is really tough on a convicted felon when comes to getting a job.  Do you know of any places here who will give a felon a shot at a job?  I live in Plantation, and I have been everywhere but all I see are doors slammed in my face.

I will take anything at this point.

Jamal



Felon in Florida in Need of a Job


Hello Jamal,

I agree it is really hard for a felon.  One thing I suggest is that take anything you can get so you can build a resume, a work history and a  reference for you to build on.  Apply for as many jobs as you can because find a job for a felon is a numbers game.  The more jobs you apply for, the greater number of interviews you will get.  The more interviews you get the greater your chances will be to get a job.  Take a look at this story which is an actual case of one of my students, Real Stories of Ex-offenders and Felons Looking for Job.  It tells the story of one of my students who was having a tough time finding a job and some of the things he had to do to get hired.

From time to time, we all need a little help.  I know there was an organization in in Ft. Lauderdale that may help ex-offenders and felons get jobsThe Urban League of Broward County has a program that helps to prepare low income, unemployed and those with criminal backgrounds for jobs.  There are other resources that can help families and single people who are having a difficult time.  You can find out more about The Urban League of Broward County and what programs are available at their website.  Under that, is one of my videos that will give you other options that may lead to you getting a job.

The Urban League of Broward County
Urban League of Broward County
11 N.W. 36th Avenue
Fort Lauderdale, FL 33311
954-584-0777 

"Programs designed to provide training and developmental skills necessary to enter or re-enter the workforce and become economically self-sufficient. Program benefits include educational services, job placement, GED preparation & testing, employability skills training and child care services. These programs offer participants career development opportunities through various life skills workshops, service-learning experiences, internships and apprenticeships."


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Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

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Felon in Florida in Need of a Job

Felon in Florida in Need of a Job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felon in Florida in Need of a Job

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