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Showing posts with label trucking companies that hire ex felons. Show all posts
Showing posts with label trucking companies that hire ex felons. Show all posts

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

Trucking companies look to felons to fill thousands of driver openings

By KEVIN SMITH | kvsmith@scng.com | San Gabriel Valley Tribune


 Trucking companies look to felons to fill thousands of driver openings
John Lauria spends his working hours driving a truck loaded with cases of juice, tea and energy drinks.
It’s quite an about-face for the 49-year-old Rosemead man who spent 30 years in and out of prison for drug and burglary offenses.
Since his last release three years ago, Lauria struggled to find a solid job. But that changed in February when, seemingly against all odds, he was hired as a truck driver for Haralambos Beverage Co. in City of Industry.
“When I applied for the job I was honest with them,” Lauria said. He got the job and now earns $17 an hour.
Lauria owes his turnaround in part to a growing U.S. labor shortage. As the long-haul trucking industry scrambles to fill openings for drivers, more than 40 large operators have tapped an unlikely labor source — felons.
The American Trucking Associations says the industry needs another 51,000 drivers to keep pace with increased shipping demands from Amazon, Walmart and other mega-retailers. The demand has prompted an increasing number of trucking companies to give non-violent, ex-offenders a second look.

Steps to a new life

Making the leap from inmate to employee doesn’t happen overnight. Training, either in prison or soon after release, is a key part of the transition.
El Monte Truck Driving school in Irwindale is among those helping get felons to work. Louie Pena, who handles recruiting and placement there, said the school skips background checks as it’s well known the trucking industry is often a lifeline for people with criminal histories.
“When someone pays $4,000 to $8,000 for training … they wouldn’t put up that kind of money if they weren’t serious,” he said.  John Kearney, CEO of Advanced Training Systems, said hiring felons makes sense, as these job candidates are especially eager to find work. Kearney’s Florida-based company makes virtual simulators used to train truck drivers.
“The concern is where you draw the line in terms of their record,” he said.

Case-by-case basis

Knight Transportation, a Phoenix-based trucking company with local facilities in Fontana and Rancho Cucamonga, hires felons. But they are heavily vetted, according to Vice President T.J. Presley.
Applicants are reviewed on a case-by-case basis, he said, which includes checking their recent and past history while also looking at where they are in life now. 
“There are a lot of great people out there who just came upon bad times,” Presley said.
Knight doesn’t hire felons whose convictions were as recent as five years ago. But those who are hired make good money.
“Entry-level drivers earn somewhere in the mid-$40,000-to-$50,000 range, and seasoned drivers can earn six figures,” Presley said. “We see a lot of turnover in the trucking industry because people with good, clean driving records are in high demand.”
R&R Transportation in Greensboro, N.C., also hires felons — providing that their crimes were nonviolent.
“If someone has a criminal record because they were arrested for drugs, whether it was 25 years ago or five years ago, that doesn’t matter,” company President Karl Robinson said. “But I wouldn’t hire anyone who was convicted of murder or did sex crimes.”
Help For Felons, a website that provides support and resources for felons, lists more than 40 trucking firms that hire drivers with criminal backgrounds. They include Swift TransportationJ.B. Hunt Transport Services, Knight TransportationBarr-Nunn Transportation and Western Express, among others.
Nine of the companies hire people with convictions that are 10 years old or more while others will consider applicants whose convictions occurred as recently as five years ago. Still, others hire on a case-by-case basis.

A good time to be looking

The current climate is good for felons in search of work, according to economist Chris Thornberg, a founding partner with Beacon Economics.
“The shortage of truck drivers is just one reflection of the broader economic situation,” he said. “There are more job openings right now across the economy than there are people who want to work. So people who didn’t have that chance three, four or five years ago now have a chance.”
But they have some catching up to do. The U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 4 percent in January, its lowest level in a decade, yet the jobless rate among the formerly incarcerated stood at 27 percent.
“Right now, if you have a record no one will hire you unless the company has a policy of accepting ex-offenders,” Kearney said. “There are plenty of people out there who have made mistakes in their lives but would have a tendency to go in the right direction if they had a job.”

Employment drives recidivism rates down

Landing a job also could keep felons from a return trip to prison.
More than half a million people are released from federal and state jails and prisons in the U.S. each year and about two-thirds will be rearrested within three years, according to the U.S. Bureau of Justice.
But a study by America Works and the Manhattan Institute shows recidivism rates dropped significantly for nonviolent offenders who found work shortly after leaving prison.
In prison-to-work programs in six cities across the country, states with overall recidivism rates of about 31 percent to 70 percent saw those rates plummet to as low as 3.3 percent for felons placed in jobs shortly after their release.

Ban the Box

California is among more than 30 states that have adopted a “ban the box” law. That prohibits private businesses with five or more workers from making pre-offer inquiries regarding a job applicant’s criminal history. Inquiries are allowed only after a conditional offer of employment is made.
Despite that law and a willingness on the part of many trucking companies to hire felons, driver shortages are still common. While R&R Transportation has 14 drivers and 13 trucks, Robinson said he’s always in the hole.
“You never have enough,” he said. “Once they get two years under their belt, other companies will hire them. You’re always going to have some attrition. But if you get the right person and they meld with the culture of the business, they will stay. It takes time to get good people.”
Lauria plans to become one of those “good” people. He hopes to gain a strong foothold in the trucking industry — and stay here.
“Getting this job is the best thing I ever did” he said. “Definitely.”


  Trucking companies look to felons to fill thousands of driver openings


Trucking Jobs for Felons



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Tuesday, March 5, 2019

Nonviolent Ex-Offenders Offer Potential Labor Source for Trucking Industry

ATS’s John Kearney calls for sensible hiring practices, effective accelerated training, and national “ban the box” laws to make the most of an opportunity both for the trucking industry and for society.

https://www.prweb.com  MARCH 04, 2019

According to the American Trucking Association, this country’s long-haul trucking industry needs about 51,000 more drivers than it currently has to meet demand for shipping capacity from companies like Amazon and Wal-Mart.[1] Meanwhile, the U.S. unemployment rate dropped to 4.0% in January, its lowest point in a decade and less than half of its recession-era level of October 2008.[2] “At the same time,” says John Kearney, CEO, Advanced Training Systems LLC, “there is a segment of the population looking eagerly for employment.” Kearney, whose company is a leading designer and manufacturer of virtual simulators for driver training, among other applications, adds, “Formerly incarcerated people, who currently have a 27% unemployment rate[3], are a largely untapped resource that could help the U.S. trucking industry fill its urgent need for new drivers.”

A frequently raised objection to hiring ex-offenders is the recidivism issue. More than half a million people are released from federal and state jails and prisons in the United States each year, and of those, according to the U.S. Bureau of Justice, about two-thirds will be rearrested within three years.[4] A joint study by America Works and the Manhattan Institute, however, notes Kearney, showed that recidivism rates dropped significantly for nonviolent offenders who became employed shortly after leaving prison. In prison-to-work programs in six cities across the country, in fact, in states with overall recidivism rates ranging from about 31% to 70%, the rates for those placed in jobs shortly after their release ranged from 3.3% to 8%.[5]

While a criminal record was once considered a knockout factor in evaluating a prospective employee in many jurisdictions, there is now a wide range of state and local regulations regarding the use of criminal records in offering or refusing employment. The practice of removing the criminal record question from employment applications is commonly called “Ban the Box.” In some places, Ban the Box regulations are applicable where the employee lives, and in others where they work is performed. Never, says industry consultant Lana Batts, do they apply to where the employer is domiciled. “The very nature of trucking,” says Batts, “makes compliance with a diverse grab-bag of Ban the Box rules a significant challenge; the trucking in industry, which keenly understands the costs of the driver shortage, needs a national Ban the Box solution applicable wherever a driver might find himself or herself in the course of completing a shipment.”[6]

Another important factor in integrating ex-offenders into the driving workforce, notes Kearney, is a reasonably streamlined training process. One important component of streamlining is the use of computerized simulation to familiarize new drivers with the proper way to handle situations too dangerous to attempt in conventional behind-the-wheel training.

“As with the shortage of school bus drivers,” says ATS’s Kearney, “also a growing source of concern[7], advanced training simulators offer an economical and highly effective approach to increasing the available supply of long-haul truckers. The technology can both reduce the cost of training and produce better, safer drivers.”

About Advanced Training Systems LLC:
Advanced Training Systems (ATS) is a high-tech simulator technology and engineering firm that has revolutionized the design and manufacture of advanced training systems to improve training and create safer drivers. ATS, the holder of multiple patents in high-tech training simulation, has as its mission to provide this cutting-edge adaptive training to all involved in the transportation industry at an affordable cost, resulting in safer drivers/operators. For more information, visit http://www.atstrainingsystems.com

1.    Long, Heather, “America has a massive truck driver shortage. Here’s why few want an $80,000 job,” Washington Post, May 28, 2018. 
2.    “National Employment Monthly Update,” National Council of State Legislatures, February 1, 2019. 
3.    Straight, Brian, “In search of truck drivers, are felons the answer?” FreightWaves, October 24, 2018. 
4.    “Recidivism Rates ‘Unacceptably High,’ says Sessions,” The Crime Report, April 9, 2018. 
5.    Cove, Peter and Bose, Lee, “Immediate Access to Employment Reduces Recidivism,” Real Clear Politics, June 11, 2015. 
6.    Batts, Lana, “Opinion: Trucking Industry Needs ‘Ban the Box’ Solution,” Transport Topics, August 25, 2017. 
7.    Osunsami, Steve, “School-bus driver shortage across US sparks growing concern,” ABC News, August 15, 
2017. 


Nonviolent Ex-Offenders Offer Potential Labor Source for Trucking Industry

Trucking Jobs for Felons




Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Trucking Jobs for Felons


Eric Mayo

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Wednesday, March 21, 2018

Uber corporate policy offers felons a second chance

Story by Ryan Randazzo,Uriel J. Garcia and Bree Burkitt, The Republic | azcentral.com



Uber corporate policy offer felons a second chanceThe operator behind the wheel of a self-driving Uber vehicle that hit and killed a 49-year-old woman in Tempe Sunday night had served almost four years in an Arizona prison in the early 2000s on an attempted armed robbery conviction.

Uber issued a statement Tuesday saying the operator met its hiring requirements in Arizona. The company directed questions to Uber's public hiring policy that states, "Everyone deserves a fair chance."

However, requirements differ across states for those who provide transportation to the public. Uber recently came under fire for hiring felons in Colorado.

"Vehicle operators in Arizona undergo a screening process that checks local, state and national databases and meets local requirements by law," an Uber spokeswoman said. "The vehicle operator met these requirements."

The San Francisco-based company's policy for hiring drivers in California states that potential Uber drivers are disqualified if they have convictions on felonies, sexual offenses, violent crimes, DUI or drug-related driving offenses, speeding more than 100 mph or child abuse or endangerment in the past seven years. The company set lower standards for lesser violations such as speeding and non-fatal accidents.

A fatal crash in the dark

Elaine Herzberg was walking a bike across Mill Avenue outside the crosswalk near the Marquee Theatre about 10 p.m. Sunday when she was hit, police said.

Police said the vehicle was in autonomous mode with an operator, who has been identified as 44-year-old Rafaela Vasquez, behind the wheel.

Tempe police spokesman Sgt. Ronald Elcock said impairment did not initially appear to be a factor for either Vasquez or Herzberg. He added it was not apparent that the vehicle attempted to slow down while it approached Herzberg.

Autonomous vehicles have been used to shuttle Uber passengers in parts of Tempe and Scottsdale. Riders who are picked up by self-driving cars likely would recognize them from the presence of the exterior sensors.

$8.9 million fine in Colorado

The Colorado Public Utilities Commission company fined Uber's parent company $8.9 million in November 2017 after an investigation determined the ride-hailing service had hired nearly 60 drivers with previous felony convictions.

Colorado state law prevents individuals with felony convictions, alcohol or drug-related driving offenses, unlawful sexual offenses and major traffic violations from working for rideshare companies.

Uber attributed the unlawful hirings to a "process area" inconsistent with Colorado's ridesharing regulations. The company said all drivers must undergo a third-party background screening "per Uber safety policies and Colorado state regulations."

A second-chance policy

Uber proudly touts its corporate policy to offer convicts a second chance.

"One mistake shouldn’t have to lead to a lifetime of punishment," the company website says. "At Uber, we are committed to working within our communities to help provide opportunities to those who need them most."

Close to 300 people worked in the self-driving operations in Tempe as of November 2017. Uber has more than 18,000 contract drivers and 1,000 employees in Arizona, with most of those staffers at the downtown Phoenix operations center.

Court records show Vasquez has a criminal record in Arizona under a different legal name.

Records from the Arizona Department of Corrections show Vasquez served three years and 10 months in prison for attempted armed robbery and unsworn falsification, the latter from when she provided false information while applying government benefits. She was released from prison in 2005.

The attempted armed robbery was in July 2000, when police say Vasquez and an accomplice conspired to rob one of her co-workers and her employer, Blockbuster Video, of a work deposit of $2,782.98, court records show.

A probation officer wrote in court records that Vasquez recognized she had surrounded herself with people who encouraged “ill-advised” actions, leading her to get in trouble. She said she needed to change who she allowed into her life and make better decisions, the officer wrote.

It appears she followed through. Vasquez has had a clean record since.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.



Jobs for felons: Turning a Criminal Record Into a Successful Career


Uber corporate policy offers felons a second chance


Uber corporate policy offers felons a second chance

Uber corporate policy offers felons a second chance

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Eric Mayo

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Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

 Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?


 Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

Local mechanic donates auto shop to help train ex-offenders

I am a felon with four burglary charges on my record, two class 2 felonies, and 2 class 3.  I live in the southwest and have been out of prison for almost 2 yrs.  I am on probation for another year.

I was convicted in May of 2011.  Since I have been out, I have attended and graduated from a. automotive institute with a diploma in diesel mechanic. I graduated almost 3 months ago and can't get a company to call me back or even give me a chance.  Even my school does not give me job leads like they have all of the guys I graduated with.  I'm sure it is because of my record.

I just want to ask you a question. With my record do you think any companies with good benefits ever give me a chance?  I feel like I have wasted my time and the last year of my life attending school.

If you have any advice, I would appreciate it.

Thank you, sincerely,


Bobby

 Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

 

Hello Bobby,

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?It seems that you are waiting for a job to come to you.  That probably won't happen.  I tell all of my students that finding a job is hard work.  Finding a job with a criminal record is harder work.  Ex-offenders and felons face tougher challenges the job seekers without records. 

One option would be to contact trucking companies in your area to see if they service their own trucks.  Because you don't have much hands-on experience you should apply as a mechanic's helper.  This means starting at the bottom, but you will gain valuable experience working with veteran mechanics. Often when you want something it means paying some dues.  Try applying at smaller independent companies.   This will also work at garages that service diesel trucks.  You can get a list of trucking companies and garages in your area from your local phone directory.  Another option is applying to national automotive service chains such as Pep Boys also as a helper.  In both cases I suggest you be totally honest about your past if questioned.

You may also find lists of open positions in your area at your local One-stop Career Center.  The center will also have other resources that can prepare you for a successful job search such as resume writing and interview preparation.  You can find your local One-stop Career Center at the link below.

http://www.servicelocator.org

Best of luck to you 


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Eric Mayo

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

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Monday, January 23, 2017

Trucking jobs for felons and ex-offenders

Trucking jobs for felons and ex-offenders


Trucking jobs for felons and ex-offenders

Piedmont trucking company leader pulling for

convicted felons to join skilled labor force



Hi,

My name is Claudio. I worked for the MBTA for 14 yrs. I was convicted of a felony in '09. I can't find work anywhere. I have a CDL and there's lots of driving jobs out there but no one calls. Is there a way that you could help me with information on where to find work or what are my options.

Thank you in advance,

Claudio






Trucking jobs for felons and ex-offenders




Hello Claudio,


Trucking jobs for felons and ex-offenders
It offers the opportunity for a great career with a good salary.  Trucking is the perfect choice for someone without a a family looking to make a fresh start.  A career in trucking is a viable option for many ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs.

Professional trucking requires a Commercial Drivers License or CDL.  Ex-offenders and felons may be eligible for CDL training in their respective states through the Dept. of Labor.  You can contact your local One-stop Career Center to inquire about funding for training.  You can find your local One-stop Career Center here:

www.servicelocator.org


There are felon friendly trucking companies all across the country.  The website below will help you identify trucking companies offering opportunities for ex-offenders and felons.

http://www.classadrivers.com/index.php?method=CompareCompanyListing&ListAll=1

Each carrier makes its own rules regarding felony convictions. Some will employ a driver after 5 years or longer since the conviction. Other companies won't hire felons, regardless. You just need to get on the phone and start contacting carriers.

Best of luck to you.

Please Rate This Post at the Top!



Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Trucking Jobs for Felons   

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Trucking jobs for felons and ex-offenders

"Trucking Jobs May be Perfect for Ex-offenders and Felons"



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Trucking Jobs for Felons | Trucking Jobs for Ex-offenders

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Thursday, July 2, 2015

Felon with Withheld Adjudication seeks Trucking Jobs

Felon with Withheld Adjudication seeks Trucking Jobs



Felon with Withheld Adjudication seeks Trucking JobsHello, I was reading your site and have a question. I have a felony that was withheld adjudication on a constructive possession (a passenger in my car had drugs) a little over 4 yrs ago and that's it. But I can't get a job anywhere I've looked. I also don't have a CDL but can get one either through job training or school. I know about Carolina Cargo but that's it. Do you have any info on any other companies out there who will take a non experienced driver or newly trained driver with a background showing I plead guilty  but was with held? I was unaware at the time that this was pretty much no different than pleading guilty and being adjudicated with a sentence.


 Thanks.

 BCM
 

Felon with Withheld Adjudication seeks Trucking Jobs


Hello,

Withheld Adjudication is not necessarily a terrible thing.  I get a number of inquiries regarding withheld adjudication / deferred judgement /deferred adjudication. Ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs should understand what it means because it could affect their ability to be hired for some jobs. Withheld adjudication / deferred judgement/deferred adjudication generally relates to a determination by a judge to place a person on probation without a judgement of guilt. There will be terms set by the court, usually a fine and a period of probation. Once the conditions are fulfilled, the charges are normally dismissed. There will be no conviction related with that offense. If conditions are not met, a finding of guilty may be entered and the person may be sentenced according to the penalties specified for the offense.

So when completing an application that asks if you "Have you ever been convicted of a crime, you can answer "no" and rightly so because you haven't. The original charge will appear on a background check simply as a charge and not a conviction.  To absolutely certain of the status, you should check with the prosecutor or your probation officer associated with your case.  This is not intended as legal advice, simply general information. If you really concerned about the charge itself (employers are rarely concerned with charges.  They care more about convictions) you may look into having your charges sealed by the court.  Sealing is a legal process that conceals the charges from public view.  The charge will only be visible to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies.

Felon with Withheld Adjudication seeks Trucking Jobs
As for trucking jobs for felons, the site below has a good list of trucking companies. A large number of them have hired ex-offenders and felons. Some have their hiring policies as they relate to ex-offenders and felons included.


 Each of the companies listed makes its own rules regarding felony convictions and the hiring of felons. Some will employ a driver after 5 years or longer since the conviction. Other companies won't hire felons, regardless. You must contact each carrier to find out exactly what their policy is concerning the hiring of felons.
 
I hope this helps.





Felon with Withheld Adjudication seeks Trucking Jobs





 

  Felon with Withheld Adjudication seeks Trucking Jobs

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Friday, April 10, 2015

Sex offender looking for trucking job

Sex offender looking for trucking job

 

Hi,

I'm a sex offender looking for a job in trucking.  It's hard to find a company. Can u help me?








Sex offender looking for trucking job


Sex offenses are among the most difficult convictions to overcome.  It is my experience. Sex offenders have a higher success rate when they apply for jobs that have limited contact with other employees or the public.  Truck driving is ideal for felons looking for a situation like this. Driving trucks is an option for many ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs.   I know many registered sex-offenders who are driving trucks. The challenge is to find a company that will offer you an opportunity. Here is a list of companies, some of which will hire ex-offenders.

http://www.truckersdispatch.com/truck-driving-and-felonies

This list includes notes of which companies consider hiring those with criminal backgrounds.

I hope this helps.



Sex offender looking for trucking job






Real Help for Ex-offenders and Felons Looking for Jobs

 

 Sex offender looking for trucking job

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