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Showing posts with label Jobs for felons. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Jobs for felons. Show all posts

Monday, December 10, 2018

Wife of felon wants to help him get a job

Wife of felon wants to help him get a job


Wife of felon wants to help him get a job
Hello,

My husband has been released from prison after ten years about 3 months ago. Since than time we're finding it very hard for him to find employment. I mean extremely hard and he has become very depressed. He has gone to target, walmart, meijers, home depot, best buy, Kroger's, McDonald's, kfc, you name it we have filled out applications. He has called them on several occasions to check back about employment. He has two violent felonies and has had many doors slammed in his face. He just feels like giving up. I don't want him to do anything drastic at this point. I really don't know how much more to help him. Is there any advice you can offer us? It would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Concerned Wife



Wife of felon wants to help him get a job



I'm sorry your husband is having so much trouble. Having two violent felonies makes getting a job difficult. It's time for some out-of-the-box thinking.

My suggestion is for him to contact his parole or probation officer. Often they know of employers who hire felons. They also have felons on their caseloads who have gotten jobs. perhaps the officer can point him in the direction of these employers.

Another strategy that often works is to have your husband contact the judge who sentenced him. Judges are influential people with many contacts. He can express to the judge how important getting a job is and his desire to stay on the right side of the law. He should ask the judge for any assistance he can offer. You will be surprised at how effective this will be.

I hope this helps.

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 Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can felons get Jobs

 Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Wife of felon wants to help him get a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Wife of felon wants to help him get a job

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Felon wants to join the military

Felon wants to join the military


 Can a Felon Join the Military
Hey my name is Dylan. I have recently gained interest in joining the army. I’m from Illinois and I was charged with a class 1 felony in November, 2016 when I was 17 years old and was charged as an adult. I’m 18 years old now. By law I’m suppose to serve prison time, however I was granted a strict probation sentence. I’m still going through the motions of court, but upon completion of probation the felonies will be expunged. I want to enlist and get things started as soon as possible! Please help me out! Let me know what I can do! Thank You!

Dylan



 Felon wants to join the military



Hello Dylan,

The military is often an option for ex-offenders looking for jobs.  Once your probation is finished, I suggest you speak to a recruiter. Even if your charge is expunged, it will still be visible to the military. It will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and any government agency.  The recruiter will be able to help you establish your eligibility. I don't know which branch of the military you are interested in but the Army has a record of being more lenient than the others.  I know of felons who have joined the military and turned service in careers.  You can learn a useful trade in the military and also gain military status that will give you an edge when applying for jobs after your service is completed.

If recruitment numbers are down, you will have a better chance.  The Army has been known to grant waivers to convicted felons who have finished their sentences.  Waivers are considers on a case by case basis so your particular offense will be considered.

I hope this helps.




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Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Truth About Background Checks

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
Felon want to join the military

Felon want to join the military

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Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Felon wants to join the military

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Saturday, November 24, 2018

Shutting former felons out of opportunity is economically foolish

Nearly half of all children have a parent with a criminal record, and the US is losing $87 billion a year in GDP by not employing them



Shutting former felons out of opportunity is economically foolish
Ap Prison Visitor Fee A File Usa Az
(Photo: Matt York/AP)
Our nation’s failed experiment with overcriminalization has burdened between 70 million and 100 million people with criminal records. That's nearly a third of the population. Millions are marked with a scarlet letter that can lead to a lifetime of closed doors.

And closing opportunities — in housing, education and, more than anything else, employment — isn't just morally wrong, it's bad economic policy. 

The two of us don't agree on much — one of us is a former Obama administration official and the other works for Koch industries. But we both believe adamantly in the need for second chances and in the economic boon our country would experience if we fully gave them to people with criminal records who have paid their debt to society. 

And while there is some momentum in Congress to enact reforms on the federal level, the fact remains that the federal system is only a small part of America's criminal justice problem. The lion’s share of criminal records come from the states, and there’s much states can do to put fair chances within reach, no matter what happens in Washington in the coming weeks.

Doesn't make economic sense

Shutting people with criminal records out of the workforce costs the United States up to $87 billion in lost gross domestic product every year. Individuals who can’t make a living legally are more likely to continue breaking the law and are likely to go back to prison, causing costs to rise even higher. Needless, preventable cycles of recidivism strain government resources — and make our communities less safe.

If a job applicant has a criminal record, his chances of getting called back for the job or of getting a job offer are essentially cut in half. Sometimes, that bias is legally mandated. Most states have multiple occupational and business licensing laws that prohibit hiring people with felony convictions. Still more legal restrictions deny formerly incarcerated people access to crucial resources like loans, credit and educational opportunities. And if these individuals want to vote to change that system — well, they often can’t do that, either.

It’s not just individuals who suffer because of this discrimination — it’s entire families. More than 33 million kids in the USA have a parent with a criminal record.

When formerly incarcerated people can’t find housing, their children are often forced to live with grandparents or sent into foster care. These challenges can lead to behavioral and school performance problems that get in the way of a kid’s future — making it more likely for that family to be trapped in a cycle of poverty for generations.

Current laws aren't enough

There are already laws that are supposed to help folks get second chances. States allow people to petition to expunge or seal at least certain records. 

Nonetheless, thanks to antiquated and complex application processes, the steep cost of legal assistance and expensive court fees, millions of eligible Americans can’t move on with their lives.

Clearing those records should be made much simpler. Pennsylvania’s Republican-controlled legislature and Democratic governor managed to work together this summer to do just that. They passed legislation, known as the Clean Slate Act, that will automatically seal certain types of records once a person has shown that he's on the right track by remaining crime free for a set period. States as diverse as Michigan, South Carolina and Colorado are seeking to do the same.

It’s a commonsense move that will make a huge difference — both for individuals and for the economy. 

In Michigan, improvements for the formerly incarcerated were seen even during the first year that their records were "set aside," according to a University of Michigan study. Wages, for example, increased by 22 percent. 

And data collected by the Society for Human Resource Management and the Charles Koch Institute show that most in the business world are open to hiring and working alongside individuals with criminal records.

The midterm elections exposed the deep divisions so many feel in this country. It also marked the start of political careers for a number of state legislators and governors. As they think about what they’ll prioritize during their terms, we hope they'll take up legislation that will automatically seal or expunge records, to give people the chance to start over and strengthen their state and local economies. 

Our nation works only if we keep our promises. This is a chance for state legislators to lead the way for their federal counterparts by moving past the divisions that too often define our politics. It’s an opportunity to come together — to strengthen our communities, to support our neighbors, to give people the opportunity to succeed. When we say that everyone deserves another chance and a fair shot at the American dream, let’s make sure we mean it.


David Plouffe and Mark Holden, Opinion contributors
The original article can be found here: https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/policing/2018/11/23/former-felons-being-pushed-out-workforce-hurting-our-economy/2016435002/


Shutting former felons out of opportunity is economically foolish



Eric Mayo

Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

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Monday, November 12, 2018

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job



Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job
Hello,

My name is Tim. I was reading the blogs on the web site. I have complete compassion in this matter as I am also a convicted felon. It's shameful just to say it aloud, but like the others I have accepted it and realized what I have done is wrong.  My convictions unfortunately were aimed mainly at my parents when I was younger do to an emotionally unstable home life. I have corrected my problems and own emotional bouts. I am a successful father of two beautiful little girls and engaged to the most wonderful woman on this planet. We are buying a house soon on her income....I feel less of a person not being able to provide for my family.

I was told last week by Kelly services after an interview that I had the job. It was the best news I heard since my lady said yes to that important question after we laid our baby girl down for the night. I went to work today, I loved it. I liked it so much I started to talking to the human resources person about retirement and shares in the biz. I received a phone call on the way home tonight which is what has sparked my efforts for finding an answer online. Kelly services was relaying a message that a background check had come back and they found a felony.

The conviction that was in question was a misdemeanor. I'm not even sure that will save me from what's ahead but I plan on taking immediate action in the morning. My hopes lie within the kind heart of the hr woman from the place I was employed. The conviction in '07 was not a felony, if there is any possible way to get that taken care of on a very bare income please let me know. Thank you for your time and have wonderful day.

Sincerely,

Tim


Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job



Hello Tim,

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job
Two things come to mind. First, if the conviction was on the application, It wouldn't be a question. As I suggest to all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, be totally honest when completing employment applications. It would make no sense to leave convictions off when applying, get hired and than lose the job when background checks are done at a later time.

If your only situation is that your misdemeanor is listed as a felony, one option is to have the prosecutor associated with your case to correct the situation. Often the prosecutor has the power to downgrade a felony to a misdemeanor.  If there was an error, you should have no problem getting this done.  If you have no success there, I suggest contacting your local legal aid office. There you may be able to get low-cost or even no-cost assistance correcting your situation. Often ex-offenders and felons looking for employment require some legal assistance and that is a good place to start.

I hope this helps

Jobs for felons: Expungement - A Way to Erase Your Criminal Record



Jobs for felons: Expungement basics


Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Expungement | Pre-trial Intervention

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Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?

From The North Carolina Dept. of Commerce

The share of former offenders finding work in North Carolina within a year after release from state prison declined from 62% in 1998 to 39% in 2014. This article explores some of the factors that may be responsible for this trend, including changes in the labor market that have made it harder to find a job—particularly for blue-collar workers, and especially for former offenders.

In previous articles, we reported that the employment prospects of ex-offenders improved following the end of the Great Recession as the economy grew and the labor market tightened. However, data from the North Carolina Common Follow-up System (CFS) reveal that the post-release employment rates of former prisoners remain much lower than in the late 1990s—a potentially worrying trend.[1]

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?


This article, while not exhaustive, offers some theories for why the fortunes of former offenders recently released from state prison have worsened since the late 1990s. Job-finding rates have declined among jobseekers in general (not just ex-offenders) in North Carolina and nationwide over the past two decades, reflecting underlying changes in the labor market that have made it more difficult to find work. One change in particular—a slump in goods-producing jobs—may be limiting the types of employment opportunities traditionally available to former offenders. In addition, the widespread practice of pre-employment background checks has placed further impediments to post-release job-finding.

The upshot: regardless of the cause, former state prisoners in North Carolina are experiencing worse employment outcomes now than they did during earlier periods of economic growth. Individuals tasked with helping ex-offenders obtain employment may find it more challenging to serve this population than in previous decades, despite the opportunities afforded by North Carolina’s red-hot labor market.

Before proceeding to our theories, we should first note that the composition of the inmate population has changed over time in ways that may have affected the employment outcomes of former prisoners. For example, North Carolina’s 2011 Justice Reinvestment Act (JRA) redirected misdemeanants from state prisons to county jails, thus increasing the prevalence of felons in the prison population. Prisoners’ education levels have also decreased over time, including prior to the JRA, and as a result they may be finding fewer opportunities for gainful employment after release.[2]

Another possible explanation can be found in labor market trends occurring during this period. It has gotten progressively more difficult for unemployed jobseekers to find work since the late 1990s. The share of unemployment insurance (UI) claimants employed within a year after layoff declined from 89% in 2000 (the earliest year available) to 82% in 2014. Similar trends can be seen in survey data; the percent of unemployed workers in the Current Population Survey finding work the following month declined from 34% in 1998 to 20% in 2014.[3]

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?


These declines in job-finding, which mirror national trends, have occurred alongside “jobless recoveries” that feature persistently slow job growth, high unemployment rates, and pervasive long-term unemployment after the end of each recession. Economists have proposed a wide range of explanations for jobless recoveries, including the widespread slowdown in new business startups, which has cut off an important source of job growth; businesses taking advantage of recessions to streamline their operations; and structural changes in the labor market that have yielded permanent job losses in certain industries. These various forces have, individually or combined, helped create a less hospitable labor market for all jobseekers—not just former offenders.

The concentration of job losses in certain sectors—particularly “blue collar” industries—provides an additional clue in explaining the worsening employment outcomes of ex-offenders. North Carolina has followed the rest of the nation in seeing declining levels of employment in goods-producing sectors, particularly in Manufacturing and Construction. The Construction sector experienced steep job losses after the Great Recession, while Manufacturing employment fell continuously from the late 1990s through 2010. Our state had nearly 350,000 fewer Manufacturing jobs and 36,000 fewer Construction jobs in 2014 than it did in 1998.

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?


Indeed, most of the decline in ex-offenders’ employment rates can be accounted for by fewer finding work in Manufacturing and Construction. These sectors employ a disproportionate share of former offenders; in 1998, 12% of former offenders were primarily employed in Manufacturing within a year after release, while 11% were employed in Construction.[4] By 2014, the share primarily employed in Manufacturing and Construction had fallen to 6% and 4%, respectively. Employment in these two sectors fell by 13 percentage points, accounting for most of the 23-percentage point decrease in former offenders’ employment rates. 

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?



Finally, we note that employer hiring practices may have made it more difficult for former offenders to find work. The vast majority of employers now conduct criminal background checks on job candidates, a trend driven in part by post-September 11th security concerns and the greater availability of inexpensive background checks. The increased prevalence of background checks makes it more difficult for otherwise-qualified former offenders, particularly felons, to obtain employment; academic studies have found that employers are less likely to consider job applicants with criminal records. Among North Carolina employers surveyed by LEAD in 2018 who reported difficulty hiring, 23% reported that applicants’ criminal records were a reason for their hiring challenges. 

General disclaimers:

Data sources cited in this article are derived from surveys and administrative records and are subject to sampling and non-sampling error. Any mistakes in data management, analysis, or presentation are the author’s.


[1] The earliest data available in the Common Follow-up System for state prisoners covers the year 1997, and the latest data covers the year 2014. We calculate wages in the year after release from state prison, and treat any wage-earning during this year as an indication of employment. Around 3% of released prisoners are released from more than one period of incarceration in a given year; for these persons, we include only the last release of each year. Wage data in the CFS are based on state unemployment insurance (UI) tax records from employers, and thus may omit earnings from federal government employment, self-employment, “under-the-table” jobs, and other work not covered by state UI laws.

[2] In 2010, only 28% of exiting prisoners had completed the 12th grade or higher, compared to 43% in 1998. Source: NC Department of Public Safety, Automated System Query

[3] We use longitudinally-linked Current Population Survey microdata from IPUMS-CPS, University of Minnesota, www.ipums.org

[4] Here we define “primary employment” as the sector in which a worker earned the most wages in each year. In 1998, 37% of employed former offenders primarily worked in Manufacturing and Construction within a year after release, compared to 23% of all workers in the state.


Companies that hire felons


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Eric Mayo

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Tuesday, October 9, 2018

Jobs for Ex-offenders and felons: How to Get a Job

 Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: How to Get a Job


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: How to Get a Job
When ex-offenders and felons are released, the main priority is finding a job.  A lot a people talk about second chances, but the realty is that finding a job is going to be hard.  Hard does not mean impossible.  Hard means it's going to take a lot of hard word work and determination.  Here are some tips that will make finding a job a easier for people who are serious about getting jobs and turning their lives around.











Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: How to Get a Job



Jobs for Ex-offenders and felons: Criminal Records

Jobs for Ex-offenders and felons: How to Get a JobThe absolute first thing I tell my students is to get a copy of their criminal records.  Somewhere in the job search the question of having a record is going to come up, either on an application or when a background check is done.  I encourage my students to be totally honest whenever questioned about a criminal background.  To do this, you must know exactly what is on your criminal record.

The easiest way to get an accurate copy or your record is ask your parole or probation officer.  They are in position to get this for you. If you do not have a probation or parole officer, you can get one from the FBI.  The FBI will provide the most accurate criminal background check available.  You can get more information on getting this copy here:

https://www.fbi.gov/services/cjis/identity-history-summary-checks

There is an 18.00 fee for this report, but if you do not have the money an you can prove that you are indigent, you can receive this report for free

Jobs for Ex-offenders and felons: How Ex-offenders and Felons Can Find Jobs

The second suggestion I make to my students is to take a trip to the local One-stop Career Center.  This used to be called the employment office.  Here you will found a long list of services that can help you get a job.  There are computers that you can use to apply for jobs online and put together a resume.  If you do not know how to build a resume, you can get help doing this.  There are interview skill building classes and other classes that can get you ready for a job.  You will find a list of open jobs in you immediate area.  There are also counselors available that can assist you in your job search.  All of these service are free of charge.  You can find the nearest One-stop Career Center at the link below

http://servicelocator.org


Jobs for Ex-offenders and felons: Networking to find Jobs

Perhaps the most powerful method of finding a job is networking.  Networking is simply contacting people you already to find available jobs.  Simply talk to people you know and asking them if they know of any jobs that are open.  This seems too simple, but this is how most people find jobs. Start with your friends, neighbors, church group, elected officials and others you come in contact with frequently.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and felons: Get a Resume

I do not send my students out on a job search without a well written resume. A resume is a way to combine your skills, education, education and training in a neat package.  A resume can sell you even when you are not around.  If you do not have a good resume, I suggest you get help putting one together.  As I noted above, you can get free assistance with your next resume at you local One-stop Career center.

After you get a resume, keep plenty with you wherever you go.  You never know who you are going to meet.  Always be prepared.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and felons: Get Dressed to Find a Job

Anyone looking for a job, not just ex-offenders and felons, should understand the power of making a great impression.  Nothing does this better than a nice outfit, clean shoes and nice hairstyle.  All of this should add up to an appearance that looks professional.  Your look should say, "I am the person for this Job."  Felons get hired everyday.  They stand a better chance of getting the jobs they want when they look like they are worthy of the job.  Employer want to feel like they re hiring quality people.

Men should wear a dark suit or sports jacket with a light colored shirt and a color coordinated tie.  You always wear a pair of shoes that could be and should be shined.  Never ever wear boots or sneakers to an interview.If you do not have a suit definitely wear  light shirt.  Make sure your clothes are cleaned and pressed.

If you shave, make sure you are cleanly shaven.   If you wear a beard or mustache, make sure it is neat and trimmed.

The best look for women is a suit with a knee-length skirt or pants and a light colored blouse.  Be sure to to wear natural looking pantyhose.  The best shoes are neat looking pumps with heels that are not too high.    Make up should not be heavy and avoid bright colored or black nail polish.  Keep jewelry to a minimum.  One necklace, one ring, one bracelet per wrist and earrings no larger than a quarter.

Shower on the day of the interview.  Just use a fresh smelling soap.  Avoid cologne or oils.  You don't want to chance a negative reaction.    Do not eat or smoke before your interview.  Be sure to brush your teeth.  Your breath should be fresh and your teeth clean.

Do your absolute best to look like a professional on your interview.  Looking like a professional will show respect four yourself, the interviewer and the opportunity to interview.

Practice Interviewing

The best thing you can do prepare for an interview is to practice.  Practice your body language and posture.  Anticipate the questions that the interviewer might ask and come up with good answers to those questions.  Practice answering the questions but do not memorize them.  Practice them until they sound natural.  Get someone to pose as the interviewer and record your practice interviews.

Always us appropriate language when interviewing and never use slang.  Listen carefully and be sure to answer every question completely but do not talk too much.  Be prepared to talk about your criminal record but don't focus on it.  Instead, focus on what you have done to improve yourself.

Nothing takes the place of preparation.  Practice until you feel confident and you will do well.


Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use







Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: How to Get a Job



Ex-offenders and felons who have paid their debt to society may believe that they deserve a second chance. This sound good but opportunities are not given.  They are earned. You will have to work for each and every chance you will get. With genuine hard work and sincere desire to better your life, you can make a ton of opportunities for yourself.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and felons: How to Get a Job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Eric Mayo

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Monday, October 1, 2018

Re-Entering the Workforce After Prison Harder For Non-Whites

Getting hired after serving time can be more difficult for some than for others


Candace Manriquez Wrenn Arizona Public Media


Re-Entering the Workforce After Prison Harder For Non-Whites
A group of scholars at the University of Arizona sought to find how felony convictions affect those looking to re-enter the workforce. Their study shows that the convictions aren’t the only hurdle for getting a job.

The U.S. Department of Justice projects that 9 percent of all men will serve time in federal or state prison. With the median time served being just over two years, most formerly incarcerated people will eventually be back on the job market.

Tamar Kugler is an associate professor in the Eller College of Management at the University of Arizona. She said the ability to find a job is critical, not only for those who’ve been to prison, but also for society.

"We want those people to be productive members of society, to be able to get a legit job, stay out of prison, earn enough money so they rehabilitate their lives."

But she said convicted felons can have a hard time finding work once they are released.

"Those people usually have lower education so it’s harder for them to find a job. And they have also experienced an erosion of skills from the fact that they have been out of the job market."

She notes that people who have served time also have a lack of ties to legitimate employers.

According to the Brookings Institution, in the first full calendar year following their release, almost half of those previously incarcerated have no reported earnings and the median earnings of those that do are just above $10,000 a year.

Kugler, along with Barry Goldman at the University of Arizona and Dylan Cooper at California State University, Channel Islands, cited research that shows that blacks and other minorities are more frequently denied jobs because of racial discrimination, but they wanted to test whether blacks with felony convictions were penalized more than whites with identical felony convictions, work experiences, and skills during the hiring process. Dr. Kugler says:

"We find that black applicants pay a much bigger price in terms of their desirability to get hired for a job than white applicants. The reduction that the white applicants suffer from having a felony conviction is not nearly as big as that that you see for black applicants."

Findings like these aren’t purely academic.

Clyde Hardin, a tattoo artist in Tucson, served two stints in prison. When he was released, he had help finding a job.

"My, now, wife got me my first job. I did commercial cleaning in buildings, banks, overnight and that paid my fees, fines, restitution and then when I wasn’t doing that, I would just hustle my butt off with tattooing." 

But working overnights hindered Hardin’s ability to tattoo, a passion he developed in prison that he hoped to turn into a career. So, he began to look for a different job:

"Probably in a four-month span over 100 applications. Legitimately. I’m talking Craigslist jobs, jobs listings, newspaper, door-to-door," he said.

And when he would land an interview, things often went downhill quickly.


"I would get to the interview process and as soon as I started explaining my record or why I was incarcerated, you would see the momentum swing of he’s a potential future hire to I would never hire this guy."


Findings like these aren’t purely academic.

Clyde Hardin, a tattoo artist in Tucson, served two stints in prison. When he was released, he had help finding a job.

"My, now, wife got me my first job. I did commercial cleaning in buildings, banks, overnight and that paid my fees, fines, restitution and then when I wasn’t doing that, I would just hustle my butt off with tattooing." 

But working overnights hindered Hardin’s ability to tattoo, a passion he developed in prison that he hoped to turn into a career. So, he began to look for a different job:

"Probably in a four-month span over 100 applications. Legitimately. I’m talking Craigslist jobs, jobs listings, newspaper, door-to-door," he said.

And when he would land an interview, things often went downhill quickly.



Companies that hire felons






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Eric Mayo

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Monday, September 24, 2018

Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs

Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs

 

Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs
Hello,

I have a police record. One charge is for domestic violence. It shows assault and battery. I was ordered to counseling, Which turned into grief counseling because of the reasons the fight happened. The other charge is a false charge that I am in the process of requesting expungement. There were no charges or a court hearing. I was having a drink with a friend. A known drug dealer was in the bar and asked to buy me a drink. I did not accept, we talked for about 5 minutes and he left. All of a sudden an undercover policeman shows me his badge and asked if we can talk outside. I go out with him and was questioned about the drug dealer. I said I didn't know him and had no information to offer. Before I knew it there were police cars, I was in handcuffs and put in jail for 3 days. 3 times a day I was taken from my cell and questioned. Every time I had no informational new charges kept getting added to my record.

After 3 days I was released and my record now shows dangerous drugs. Both of these happened 20 years ago. I have passed 3 tests to be a TSA screener my 4th test is Tuesday. When I pass this they will run a background check. At what point do I explain this to someone? I currently work at KMart and they ran a background check but hired me without asking questions. It was the same with Home Depot as well! Do you know if TSA is strict about 20 years ago? Do you know if they ask for an explanation of my background? I really need a job with a good paycheck and I've always wanted this particular job!

Thank you for helping me!

Sincerely,

Sally


Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs



Hello Sally,

Generally speaking, when talking about records, employers are concerned with convictions and not charges. As I tell all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, answer honestly on both applications and interviews. If applications asks for convictions, only lists convictions, not charges. As far as interviews, nearly all of the questions will be related to information from your application. I encourage ex-offenders and felons not to volunteer information that is not asked for.

Expungement, or sealing does not erase records but hides them from public view. If an is granted the conviction will always be visible to government agencies, the court system and law enforcement. You mentioned that you have applied for a TSA position. Since this is a government position, all of your charges will be visible. Once again, if questioned, always answer honestly.

I hope this helps.

Background Checks and Criminal Records



Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights


 Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs


'Eric Mayo helps Felons and Ex-offenders get Jobs.

 

 Ex-offenders and felons should always be honest when applying for jobs


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

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Sunday, September 16, 2018

Former felons deserve a second chance

The Times Herald - Published 3:42 p.m. ET Sept. 11, 2018

Former felons deserve a second chance
One of the things that is Pure Michigan is sending people to prison. Although incarceration rates have fallen the past few years, there are three times as many people in Michigan prisons now than there were four decades ago. If Michigan were a country, it would have one of the top 20 incarceration rates in the world and would likely be on a State Department watch list.

More than six of every 100 Michiganders is in prison. About twice as many are former felons, those who have been released from prison, although many are still repaying a debt to society they no long owe.

It turns out that society needs them. Michigan needs them to get up in the morning and come to work. For many, though, that isn’t possible because one of the first things many employers ask, after name and address on a job application, is whether the applicant has been convicted of a felony.

One of those who would have to answer yes is the voice of those Pure Michigan commercials. Ten years before “Home Improvement” and 18 years before the debut of the state tourism campaign, Tim Allen was paroled from federal prison where he was serving three to seven years after being arrested with almost a pound and a half of cocaine.

Allen found work after his felony convictions.

Other former felons should be given the same chance. Many won’t. Some former felons are reluctant to apply for jobs, knowing they will have to check that box. Many employers won’t look past that blemish on a potential asset’s past history. Either way, applicants don’t get interviewed, employers don’t learn about important and relevant training and experience, well qualified people won’t get jobs and businesses will struggle to fill vital positions.

The felony question isn’t a valid predictor of future performance and should be illegal. In a handful of states and a few cities across the country, it is. A bill to ban it in Michigan never got a committee hearing.

But an executive order of Gov. Rick Snyder, Michigan last week just became one of about three dozen states that doesn’t ask the question of prospective state employees.

The city of Port Huron will no longer ask its applicants if they’ve been convicted of a felony. Beyond being a good business practice, it is part of City Manager James Freed’s campaign to give the city a reputation as a place welcoming to anyone who wants to work.

City Council can’t extend the ban to include other employers in the city, as Austin, Texas, and other cities have done.

That’s because, in March, Snyder signed Senate Bill 353, which prohibits local governments from enacting ordinances that restrict use of the felony question by private employers. Irony is not a crime.

Former felons deserve a second chance



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Former felons deserve a second chance


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

Eric Mayo

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Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Employers are slowly turning to ex-offenders to fill open jobs in a worker-hungry economy

In a tight labor market, employers are willing to expand talent pool. 

By  Star Tribune
Employers are slowly turning to ex-offenders to fill open jobs in a worker-hungry economy
Quality Ingredients CEO Isabelle Day and plant manager
Bob Banken said
six of their 60 employees are former inmates.
CEO Isabelle Day of Quality Ingredients of Burnsville was having difficulty filling jobs last year when she read a Star Tribune column about hiring former inmates.

Starting pay is $15 an hour and can reach $40,000 a year, and employees get annual bonuses, health care and a retirement plan.

Day and her plant manager work through Twin Cities Rise, the nonprofit trainer that puts ex-inmates and other low-income folks through a rigorous curriculum of personal empowerment, training and soft-skill development before placing them in internships, at temp agencies or in full-time jobs.

“These are great people who have made mistakes,” Day said. “In many cases, these people are stronger than somebody walking off the street to apply. The work is tough. We see a sincerity and great communication skills. They tend to be respectful, thoughtful and mature.”

As the job market gets tighter, employers are slowly turning to nonprofits such as Rise, Emerge, Building Better Futures, Summit Academy, Genesys Works, Goodwill Easter Seals and others that help former felons build skills and land decent jobs.

“We are safer when these guys have jobs and housing,” said CEO Dan Pfarr of 180 Degrees. “We are their step from prison to the civilian world.”

The Minneapolis nonprofit serves men on parole as they move from prison to community with short-term housing and counseling. It links them to training and organizations connected to employers. It has to happen quickly. Most parolees get only 60 to 90 days to get housing and find a job, with expenses covered by the Minnesota Department of Corrections.

The transition from prison to work, and civilian society, is not easy, particularly if you have been locked up 10 or 15 years and never operated a cellphone or computer. It also takes the right mind-set and a willingness to beat the odds.

Close to 60 percent of Minnesota inmates are back in prison within two years.

Minnesota has a lower-than-average incarceration rate but one of the highest rates of people on probation, which can end up being a “back door” to prison re-entry.

More than half of those returning to prison are on parole violations, according to the Minnesota Department of Commerce. Pfarr and Richard Coffey, 180 Degrees program director, said the violations often are for noncriminal acts, such as being late or taking a different route than prescribed to training or jobs.

“These guys, and we deal with about 300 a year, get a case manager and we work with them on a plan. Some of them have some training. I’m impressed with many of them. Life for them can be daunting,” Pfarr said.

Low jobless rate’s upside

The good news is that the low unemployment rate is prompting employers to warm to hiring former inmates.

Tony Bulmer, a former prisoner, has moved up over six months from a laborer position to a $20 supervisory position at Gregory Foods in Eagan. He’s also moving from a 180 Degrees residence to his own room in September.

“I’m taking this opportunity to the fullest,” said Bulmer, 31, also a trained diesel mechanic.

Bulmer grew up working in a family-owned bakery and likes machinery, which has helped in his new role.

“If I can see how it works, I can figure out how to do it,” he said.

A groundbreaking report last year by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) provides a road map into the “successes of corporate policies giving formerly incarcerated Americans a fair chance at re-entry.”

It’s been embraced by large employers including Google, Total Wine, the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundation, Koch Industries, Walmart and other companies.

Locally, Quality Ingredients, Target, Bremer Bank and numerous small businesses are on board.

And Rise and its national partner, Root & Rebound, which advocates for former inmates, have received great response from local employers for their “Minnesota Employers’ Fair Chance Hiring Guide.”

The guide takes employers through legal compliance and risk minimization, background checks, the rewards of hiring a second-chance worker, best practices for “onboarding” former inmates and strategies for helping them integrate into the workforce.

As the Minnesota prison system and number of prisoners and parolees generally ballooned over the last 30 years, in part because of mandatory sentences for drug and other nonviolent offenses, the state has spent disproportionately less on education, training and employment services.

Louis King, CEO of Summit Academy, which works with low-income people to earn high school-equivalency degrees, and train for entry-level posts in building trades, IT and health care, has said the best social-welfare program is gaining skills, and showing up for a living-wage job.CEO Isabelle Day of Quality Ingredients of Burnsville was having difficulty filling jobs last year when she read a Star Tribune column about hiring former inmates.

“Turnover was high and we were using [costly] temporary agencies for labor,” she recalled.

Today, six of the 60 factory workers on the floor of Quality Ingredients are ex-offenders.

Starting pay is $15 an hour and can reach $40,000 a year, and employees get annual bonuses, health care and a retirement plan.

Day and her plant manager work through Twin Cities Rise, the nonprofit trainer that puts ex-inmates and other low-income folks through a rigorous curriculum of personal empowerment, training and soft-skill development before placing them in internships, at temp agencies or in full-time jobs.

“These are great people who have made mistakes,” Day said. “In many cases, these people are stronger than somebody walking off the street to apply. The work is tough. We see a sincerity and great communication skills. They tend to be respectful, thoughtful and mature.”

As the job market gets tighter, employers are slowly turning to nonprofits such as Rise, Emerge, Building Better Futures, Summit Academy, Genesys Works, Goodwill Easter Seals and others that help former felons build skills and land decent jobs.

“We are safer when these guys have jobs and housing,” said CEO Dan Pfarr of 180 Degrees. “We are their step from prison to the civilian world.”

The Minneapolis nonprofit serves men on parole as they move from prison to community with short-term housing and counseling. It links them to training and organizations connected to employers. It has to happen quickly. Most parolees get only 60 to 90 days to get housing and find a job, with expenses covered by the Minnesota Department of Corrections.

The transition from prison to work, and civilian society, is not easy, particularly if you have been locked up 10 or 15 years and never operated a cellphone or computer. It also takes the right mind-set and a willingness to beat the odds.

Close to 60 percent of Minnesota inmates are back in prison within two years.

Minnesota has a lower-than-average incarceration rate but one of the highest rates of people on probation, which can end up being a “back door” to prison re-entry.

More than half of those returning to prison are on parole violations, according to the Minnesota Department of Commerce. Pfarr and Richard Coffey, 180 Degrees program director, said the violations often are for noncriminal acts, such as being late or taking a different route than prescribed to training or jobs.

“These guys, and we deal with about 300 a year, get a case manager and we work with them on a plan. Some of them have some training. I’m impressed with many of them. Life for them can be daunting,” Pfarr said.

Low jobless rate’s upside

The good news is that the low unemployment rate is prompting employers to warm to hiring former inmates.

Tony Bulmer, a former prisoner, has moved up over six months from a laborer position to a $20 supervisory position at Gregory Foods in Eagan. He’s also moving from a 180 Degrees residence to his own room in September.

“I’m taking this opportunity to the fullest,” said Bulmer, 31, also a trained diesel mechanic.

Bulmer grew up working in a family-owned bakery and likes machinery, which has helped in his new role.

“If I can see how it works, I can figure out how to do it,” he said.

A groundbreaking report last year by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) provides a road map into the “successes of corporate policies giving formerly incarcerated Americans a fair chance at re-entry.”

It’s been embraced by large employers including Google, Total Wine, the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundation, Koch Industries, Walmart and other companies.

Locally, Quality Ingredients, Target, Bremer Bank and numerous small businesses are on board.

And Rise and its national partner, Root & Rebound, which advocates for former inmates, have received great response from local employers for their “Minnesota Employers’ Fair Chance Hiring Guide.”

The guide takes employers through legal compliance and risk minimization, background checks, the rewards of hiring a second-chance worker, best practices for “onboarding” former inmates and strategies for helping them integrate into the workforce.

As the Minnesota prison system and number of prisoners and parolees generally ballooned over the last 30 years, in part because of mandatory sentences for drug and other nonviolent offenses, the state has spent disproportionately less on education, training and employment services.

Louis King, CEO of Summit Academy, which works with low-income people to earn high school-equivalency degrees, and train for entry-level posts in building trades, IT and health care, has said the best social-welfare program is gaining skills, and showing up for a living-wage job.


Employers are slowly turning to ex-offenders to fill open jobs in a worker-hungry economy


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons | felon friendly


Eric Mayo

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Tuesday, August 21, 2018

Jobs are scarce for a felon with degree

Jobs are scarce for a felon with degree


Jobs are scarce for a felon with degree
Hi there,

I have been doing some research recently on trying to find a professional career with a criminal background. Apparently I have done everything backwards. I graduated from the University of Tennessee with honors, but soon after I got into some trouble.  Long story short, I've done my time but I can't seem to find a job.  I've tried everything, but this thing is beating me down.  There is just no forgiveness and all the time I spent earning my degree is wasted just because of one mistake.


Thank you,

Frustrated

Jobs are scarce for a felon with degree


Jobs are scarce for a felon with degreeYou may be surprised how often I hear stories like yours. Unfortunately sometimes good people go through some incredibly terrible things (remember that.) Don't give up on yourself or your education. I suggest to ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs is to apply with well written cover letters introducing you and your resume. Often when apply for jobs this way, the "Have you been convicted..." question never comes up. If it does, it will be in an interview where you may offer some brief details of what led to your brushes with the law but focus on how you have overcome your past problems and what you have to offer.

As far as finding employment, make use of your local One-stop Career Center. You will find a lot of helpful services including job leads. You can find the center closest to you at http://www.servicelocator.org

I also suggest to those with college degrees to look to local community colleges. Often there are adjunct instructor positions available teaching basic subjects like English or basic math.



I hope this helps.

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Jobs are scarce for a felon with degree


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons 


Jobs are scarce for a felon with degree


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

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