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Showing posts with label hire ex-offenders. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hire ex-offenders. Show all posts

Monday, February 5, 2018

Jobs for Felons: San Francisco to Wipe Away Decades of Marijuana Convictions

Jobs for felons: San Francisco to Wipe Away Decades of Marijuana Convictions



 San Francisco to Wipe Away Decades of Marijuana Convictions
By Zusha Elinson, Wall Street Journal
Biography@ZushaElinson
zusha.elinson@wsj.com

SAN FRANCISCO—Thousands of people convicted of marijuana offenses in this city going back to 1975 will have their convictions dismissed or reduced, San Francisco’s district attorney announced Wednesday.





It marks one of the most aggressive moves to wipe away old convictions in the face of new laws legalizing marijuana in California and other states.

San Francisco District Attorney George Gascón said that his office would dismiss and seal 3,038 misdemeanor marijuana convictions, and review and possibly resentence 4,940 felonies—all of which were adjudicated before California voters legalized marijuana in 2016.

Under the state legalization measure, Californians can petition the courts to get old marijuana possession and other convictions dismissed. Mr. Gascón  said his office is taking the extra step of doing it for people in order to lift the burden of past convictions that can make it difficult for people to get jobs.

“A criminal conviction can be a barrier to employment, housing and other benefits, so instead of waiting for the community to take action, we’re taking action for the community,” said Mr. Gascón

Nine states and Washington, D.C., have legalized recreational marijuana use, and a debate has arisen over what to do with past pot convictions in these states.

In Nevada, where recreational marijuana was legalized, Gov. Brian Sandoval vetoed a bill last year that would have required certain offenses to be dismissed and sealed. Mr. Sandoval, a Republican, said in his veto message that such issues were better handled on a case-by-case basis.

In Colorado, prosecutors have raised concerns over bills making wiping away old pot convictions easier, said Arnold Hanuman of the Colorado District Attorneys’ Council.

“Many times convictions are plea bargained down from more serious conduct,” said Mr. Hanuman. “Our concern is that the original conduct involved in the incident is oftentimes more egregious.”

More states are including provisions in legalization measures for expunging past convictions, said Chris Lindsey, senior legislative counsel at the Marijuana Policy Project, which advocates for ending pot prohibitions. “This move by San Francisco is remarkable,” said Mr. Lindsey. “It’s not only do we allow people to repair their criminal histories, the local jurisdiction is just going to do it for them.”

Should all marijuana convictions be thrown out when marijuana becomes legal?


Jobs for Felons: San Francisco to Wipe Away Decades of Marijuana Convictions


Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons


Jobs for Felons: San Francisco to Wipe Away Decades of Marijuana Convictions



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Eric Mayo

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Tuesday, January 30, 2018

More Firms Willing To Employ Felons

More Firms Willing To Employ Felons


More Firms Willing To Employ Felons

By Heather Long
The Washington Post


Ron Nelsen has been in the garage door business since 1976. He can’t recall a time when it’s been this difficult to find workers for his family business, Pioneer Overhead Door in Las Vegas.

When his assistant handed him Ian Black’s resume in April, it seemed like a godsend. Black had more than a decade of experience.

Then Nelsen noticed that all of Black’s recent jobs were at a state prison.

Black is an inmate at Casa Grande, a work-release facility that’s a seven-minute walk from Pioneer Overheard Door. Nelsen knew the place well. He and other business owners in the industrial neighborhood had protested Casa Grande’s arrivalin 2005.

But now his business was booming, and Nelsen needed workers who knew what they were doing. He decided to interview the inmate.


“Ian did well in the interview. He was articulate and respectful, and he told me he’d been an idiot when he was younger,” Nelsen said. Even so, Nelsen said, “I was still apprehensive.”

America’s unemployment rate is at a 17-year low — at 4.1 percent — and JPMorgan predicts it could fall to 3.4 percent this year, the lowest level since the 1969. Businesses large and small complain they can’t find workers, especially ones willing to do the arduous labor of landscaping, construction or stocking shelves. Companies have traditionally sought out immigrant labor to fill some of these jobs, but the Trump administration is aggressively going after businesses that use undocumented immigrants. In this political and economic environment, big companies like Walmart and Koch Industries and smaller ones like Pioneer Overhead Door are turning to an underutilized source of labor: inmates and the formerly incarcerated.

It’s a large, mostly untapped pool of workers: Roughly 20 million Americans have been convicted of a felony, according to research by University of Georgia Professor Sarah Shannon and her colleagues.

But even if the need for workers is great and attitudes are shifting, it’s not an easy decision. On his desk in a big warehouse a few blocks from the Las Vegas Strip, Nelsen has statues of saints and the Virgin Mary. A practicing Catholic, he asked friends whether he should hire a Casa Grande inmate. Almost everyone said yes, he should offer a chance of redemption. Among fellow business owners, opinions were mixed.

Nelsen has five workers who hang the garage doors at homes and commercial facilities such as warehouses and carwashes. It was a big risk, some said, to take on someone who has been convicted six times for nonviolent burglaries. Nelsen’s wife urged him to take a chance. So he offered Black a job, and Black, who has been in prison for the past nine years, accepted quickly, saying it gave him a “sense of purpose” for the first time in decades.

Black spends his nights locked in a cell, but on weekdays, he wears a dark gray Pioneer Overhead Door uniform with his name on it. Customers don’t know about his past. They only see the quality of the work now. “He’s my best worker,” Nelsen said. “Out of all my technicians, he’s the one I wouldn’t want to lose.”

Some companies ask job applicants immediately if they have ever been convicted of a crime to screen them out, but the ACLU and the NAACP say they have seen a “change of heart” in the past year, with more businesses willing to take a chance on people with criminal histories. “Businesses are beginning to ask: Why did we have such stringent bans?” says Ngozi Ndulue, senior director of criminal justice programs at the NAACP.

Increasingly, business leaders see hiring people with criminal records as the right thing to do for America — and for their companies. Formerly incarcerated workers are often hard-working and loyal, and not looking to jump to another employer. “We’ve hired a lot of people with criminal records who have been good employees,” said Mark Holden, general counsel at Koch Industries. “What someone did on their worst day doesn’t define them forever.”

Black credits Nevada’s work-release program with breaking his “prison mind-set.” He had been in prison twice before for shorter stints that he says didn’t change him. He was released in 2008 with $25 to his name. With no money and few prospects, he went right back to what he knew before, the world of crime and drugs. Within two months, he was caught stealing again.

“I grew up in a very cliche childhood: Broken home. My mom passed away when I was young, and I bounced around a lot. I cared about nothing,” Black says. “I was a career criminal. It took a devastating amount of prison time for me to rethink my position in this world.”

Black has now spent nearly a decade in prison, staying clean from drugs and learning how to be “more thankful” and “not so judgmental.” He meditates and draws in the evenings. When he turned 40, he joined the prison squad that fights wildfires. A year later, he was able to apply for Casa Grande and get into a job orientation class called Turning Point. “I want to be able to look myself in the mirror. I want to be respectable,” Black, now 42, says.

Most of the money he earns goes to pay restitution to people he stole from and to the state of Nevada to cover rent at Casa Grande. But he has saved about $700, which he believes will be life-changing when he gets out of prison.

Black is among the 2.3 million Americans behind bars, about 95 percent of whom will be released. Finding better ways to get people from prison into jobs is a cause that has united conservatives, especially religious and business leaders, with progressives. It has even made it onto President Trump’s agenda.

“Many prisoners end up returning to crime, and they end up returning to prison,” Trump said at a White House event this month on prison reform. “We can help break this vicious cycle through job training.”

Only 45 percent of men released from prison had a job eight months later, according to a 2008 study by the Urban Institute’s Justice Policy Center. There’s a major push to change that now that the economy is far better than it was a decade ago. Some of the most outspoken advocates are conservative power brokers like the Koch brothers and Clay Bennett, owner of the Oklahoma Thunder basketball team. Last summer, Bennett invited ACLU fellow Megan Marcelin to speak to a large gathering of Oklahoma business executives to make the case for hiring people with criminal pasts. She found a receptive audience.

“This would never have happened a year ago,” says Marcelin, who is now with JustLeadershipUSA, a criminal justice reform advocacy group. “Businesses and corporations on the right are really playing a role in getting behind this issue.”

Many conservatives, including Trump, see prison-to-job initiatives as part of a larger goal of reducing prison and welfare costs and lowering unemployment.

Walmart and Koch Industries no longer ask about criminal histories on their job applications. That small step has given many more people a chance to get in front of a hiring manager. Walmart and Koch don’t do a full background check until the final stages of the hiring process, when they already have a sense of an applicant.

This is part of a broader movement known as “ban the box,” a reference to removing the check-box question on applications.

President Barack Obama banned the box for most federal government jobs. A grass-roots movement has advocated for changes in state laws as well. “It’s common sense: We want former prisoners to be able to support themselves,” says Beth Avery, a staff attorney at the National Employment Law Project. “That’s good for everyone in the long run. It reduces recidivism and public spending on incarceration.”

The federal government doesn’t track how many people with criminal histories have been hired across the country. But studies of cities such as Minneapolis that have banned the box found that more than 50 percent of people whose applications had been flagged with “concern” because of a prior conviction were hired after the law changed.

Nelsen says he’s become more aware of what these reforms can do for society — and for businesses.

“I was originally negative on Casa Grande,” Nelson said. “Now I’m one of the biggest beneficiaries of it.”

The ACLU and Koch Industries are also pushing for people with criminal pasts to be able to get state licenses to do everything from plumbing to being makeup artists to being security guards. Nearly 30 percent of U.S. jobs require a state license, according to the Brookings Institution, but some states prevent felons from getting licenses.

Another hurdle that remains is racial prejudice. Studies have found it’s twice as easy for white inmates and formerly incarcerated Caucasians to get jobs than for African Americans. Research by economists at the University of Virginia and the University of Oregon last year found that banning the box caused some employers to discriminate against African Americans and Latinos because hiring managers made assumptions about who was more likely to have a criminal record.

Black feels lucky to be working again and is preparing for a parole hearing in February. He has been mentoring a 20-year-old named Eric Fernandez, who recently joined Pioneer Overhead Door. Black showed him what tools to buy and taught him all the different types of garage door springs. In exchange, Fernandez drives the truck, since Black can’t get his driver’s license back yet.

What’s it like to be working with Black? Fernandez shrugs, signaling he hasn’t given it much thought.

“He’s pretty funny,” Fernandez says. He looks over at Black and they laugh in unison, pausing for a few seconds in the Las Vegas heat before getting back to work.



Companies that hire felons



More Firms Willing To Employ Felons



More Firms Willing To Employ Felons



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Eric Mayo felons

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Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job

 Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job


 Veteran is a Felon Looking for a JobGood morning,

My name is Irene and I am a veteran and a convicted felon. My thing is that I was in so much trouble in my past until I'm scared to apply for a job thinking I have something outstanding out there. I'm too afraid to go get a back ground check knowing if it's something out standing they will take me in custody. I have a military back ground which consists of administrative work and I'm a certified medical assistant. My criminal background consist of fraud and I've always assumed no one will hire me. I'm 37 years old and I am no longer that person I was back then.

Please if you can, can you give me some advice.

Thanks


Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job



Hello Irene,

First of all, I teach all of my students to apply for every job they feel that they qualify for.  If you apply for a job, you may get it or you may not.  If you do not apply for it, you definitely will not.  Never disqualify yourself from a job.  Finding a job is a numbers game.  The more jobs you apply for, the more jobs you are in the running for.  Ex-offenders and felons get hired everyday.  The reason they get hired is they don't let the fact that they have criminal records hold them back.

You are a veteran.  There are many services available for veterans looking for jobs.  There are also tax incentives for employers who hire veterans.  Below is the link to the government sit where you will find valuable resources that can help veterans such as yourself.



I hope this helps.

 Eric Mayo

Jobs for Felons: Most Vets Aren't Aware of Their VA Benefits


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job

Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!



Veteran is a Felon Looking for a Job



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Jobs for Veterans

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Monday, October 30, 2017

Lady Felon Searching for a Job

Lady Felon Searching for a Job

 


Lady Felon Searching for a Job
Hi,

My name is Anita, I was convicted of involuntary manslaughter in February of 2003, It was a death by motor vehicle, and there were no drugs or alcohol that contributed to the accident. I received a three years probation, the accident actually occurred on October 2001, I just had to wait for a court date because it was tried by a jury.



On April 2005, I was charged with a misdemeanor for which I received a 1 year probation or until my fines were paid. I received unemployment from the job because they found that I wasn't responsible for the money being missing. I just was too afraid to take it to court because I was afraid of the outcome. My lawyer told me to plead no contest, I didn't want to but I didn't have the $5000.00 it would cost for a proper defense.
Lady Felon Searching for a JobAnyway, I was working for Moore County Schools, and I disclosed my criminal record before I was hired, but they can't find the application. I hadn't been convicted at the time I had started substituting for the school, and at that time it wasn't required unless you have been convicted. However, when I was asked to take on a Teacher's Assistant position in 2004, I had been convicted, and I filled out the criminal record part on the computer at the school. I thought that I was not going to be able to get the job because of my record. To make a long story short, someone called a T.V. station and told them that I had a criminal record. I was then asked to resign from my position.

Right now I have been unable to get a job, and I thought since the involuntary manslaughter charge was an accident that it didn't matter, and the misdemeanor charge wouldn't have any bearing on my job because I didn't work with money. I never got reprimanded for my work performance, and in fact I received great evaluations. I tried to go to a place that helped people with records get a job, but it was limited to those that actually went to prison, or those that had a drug problem. Is there any organizations out there that could help me find a job?




Lady Felon Searching for a Job




Hello Anita,

I'm sorry your situation is causing you so much stress. As I often suggest to certain people who want to work in schools, try private or charter schools whose hiring practices are more liberal than public school systems.

Often ex-offender and felon job searches require some help from an attorney. Contact your local legal aid
office to seek assistance in getting your criminal record sealed or expunged since they are non-violent offenses. I should make getting a job easier.

I also suggest applying for temporary jobs. Often if temporary employees are good, they are hired on a permanent basis. When applying for temporary employment, it is better to apply at small independent agencies rather than larger national companies. Smaller agencies are free to hire anyone they choose. You do have marketable skills, so you are in a better position than most ex-offenders and felons job 
searching.


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Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record

 Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Do's and Don'ts of Interview Attire for Women


Lady Felon Searching for a Job

Lady Felon Searching for a Job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

  Lady Felon Searching for a Job


 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Woman Felon

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Wednesday, October 18, 2017

Felon is having a tough time finding a job

Felon is having a tough time finding a job 

 

12 Best Jobs if You Have a Felony

Hello,

I found your website very informative and would like to convey my story to you. I met Kurt in 2004 and we fell in love and have been living together ever since. His story began in 1978 when he held up several hotels. He served time and was paroled in 1984. He did another holdup in 1984 and served a total of 8 years for all his crimes. His most recent offense was an assault charge in 2005. That charge stemmed from my ex stalking me and threatening me with a gun. Kurt went to jail, not the gun carrying stalker. Go figure. He cannot find a job to save his life. All he wants to do is work. He's tried Goodwill. Here in Fort Worth, the job that they told him to come in for wanted a clean criminal background.

He most recently was washing cars for a valet service at DFW airport. As soon as the background report came back, he was let go.

He is one of the most intelligent and kind men I have ever met. His prospects are very limited at this time and he feels totally worthless. He has excellent computer and phone skills and has proved that when he worked with me in the oil and gas industry several years ago being a landman.

He has signed up with any and all temporary firms that are out there and they tell him that they cannot place him because of his background. He has been through Texas Workforce Commission and they are totally useless.

With kind regards,

Gwyn


 Felon is having a tough time finding a job




Hello Gwyn,

Kurt has some serious convictions to work with, armed robbery and aggravated assault. I have worked with tougher cases. He may have the best chance at employment applying for jobs that don't have much contact with others or valuables. As I always suggest for felons with similar offenses, warehouse or factory work may offer the best opportunities.

I wish there was a simple solution but there is not.  Whenever he gets an interview, he can tell the prospective employer that he can be bonded.  See the video below about The Federal Bonding Program.  Often ex-offenders and felons stand a better chance of getting hired by employers if they are bondable.






Jobs for Felons:  What is the Federal Bonding Program?



Jobs for Felons: How to Get a Federal Bond


  


Felon is having a tough time finding a job

Felon is having a tough time finding a job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felon is having a tough time finding a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Felon Jobs

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Monday, August 7, 2017

Can a Convicted Felon get a Job as a Nurse?

Can a Convicted Felon get a Job as a Nurse?
Can a Convicted Felon get a Job as a Nurse?
I am a convicted felon with a civil rights violation. (I used to be a police officer) I have not been able to find a job and I am assuming it is because of my felony. I am planning on going back to school and wanted to become a registered nurse. I have heard conflicting info about a felon getting a nursing license. I have been told by two states board of nursing that I would have to graduate from nursing school before they would hear my case. That doesn't make any sense to me. Why would I want to pay my way through nursing school if there was a chance I couldn't get a license? I need to find out what type of licenses a felon can successfully obtain and what companies hire felons in the mean time. Any information will be helpful.

Thank You,

Jenn

Can a Convicted Felon get a Job as a Nurse?


Hello Jenn,

I'm sorry you are having so much trouble getting definitive information. The certification processes will vary from state to state. A felon may be eligible in one state and not another. Many states have on-line overviews of licensing procedures as they relate to various professions.

My next suggestion is to get some legal assistance in finding out about the licensing of felons in your state. You may be able to get low-cost or even no cost assistance at your local legal aid office.



Please Rate This Post at the Top!


The Different Types of Nurses



Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Can a Convicted Felon get a Job as a Nurse?

Can a Convicted Felon get a Job as a Nurse?

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Can a Convicted Felon get a Job as a Nurse?


 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Nursing Jobs for Felons

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Thursday, July 6, 2017

Felon wants jobs and an education

Felon wants jobs and an education

All colleges should remove this barrier


I moved back to New Jersey 6 months ago after living in BEAUTIFUL Oregon for 9 years. I haven't gotten a job yet. I have 2 felonies that are drug related. I also want to go to school to become a Certified Public Accountant and I am wondering if I am able to get financial aid?

If you have answers for me, I am anxious to here.

Thanks,

Pam

Felon wants jobs and an education


Hello Pam,

I have many students who are felons have gone on to academic careers. Regarding receiving federal financial aid for college, I know of felons and ex-offenders who were able to obtain grants and loans for education and subsequently jobs. Unfortunately not everyone convicted of a felony is eligible. Certain drug convictions require that you complete an accepted drug rehabilitation program in order to be eligible for federal financial aid.

Felon wants jobs and an education
I suggest you contact the financial aid office of the school you wish to attend. The school wants you as a student and will do everything they can to assist you. They will also help you complete the FAFSA (Free Application for Federal Student Aid.)

You can get get the more information as well as a down loadable FAFSA here:


http://www.fafsa.ed.gov

There also may be financial aid available from your state.

I hope this helps.
 

Jobs for felons: Overview of the Financial Aid Process

Jobs for felons: Myths About Financial Aid


Felon wants jobs and an education


Felon wants jobs and an education

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!



Felon wants jobs and an education

 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Education for Felons

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Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Felon with experience needs a Job

Felon with experience needs a Job

Are employers finally giving felons a second chance?
I'm a felon, convicted of mortgage fraud in 2005. My charge stems from a 1998 business deal and resulted in 5 years probation. I've accepted my situation and remained gainfully employed through my small business until 2009. Now, small business owners are subject to background checks before being awarded government contract. All small business certifications require background checks on the owner before the certification is granted.

Needless to say, my contracting career is over even though I have 13 years of outstanding references from government agencies. Every contact I have will say their hands are tied when it comes to hiring a company whose owner has a felony conviction. I had to shut down my business (53 employees) and look for work. I hold a master of science in technology management and a master of business administration and I have over 20 years of IT experience.

I have been looking for a job since February 2009. After posting my resume online, I get 4 to 5 responses a week. I disclose my situation during the telephone interview and it goes not further. Most companies will say it's their policy not to hire anyone with a felony conviction. Unfortunately, in the Washington DC area, every job now requires a background check - even McDonalds.

 
After much research, I found the Second Chance Act of 2007. The Second Chance Act is designed to improve outcomes for felons returning to communities from prisons and jails via employment assistance, housing, mentoring, etc. Well, the Second Chance Act does not apply to felons that received probation. As a felon that has paid my debt, improved myself through education, and function as a law abiding citizen, I am not given a second chance. I currently receive unemployment compensation, which is 1/3 of what I need to cover mortgage, electricity, water, phone and food. I am absolutely one step from homeless and hungry (with 2 masters degrees). Any suggestions? 

Regards,

Homeless in D.C.



Felon with experience needs a Job



 
Hello Homeless,

Ex-offenders and felons with skills and experience are in far better shape than those without. You simply have to be more creative about how to employ your skills.

Firstly, I suggest contacting smaller independent IT contractors. You could subcontract through them and not be subject to the same scrutiny as primary contractors. Get the telephone book and get to work. There has to be at least a few that could have a job for you.


Companies are given a $2400 tax credit for hiring felons and there is a Federal Bonding Program for at-risk (felon) employees.  See the link below for information about the Work Opportunity Tax Credit

WOTC


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Federal Bonding Program



 
Secondly, I suggest considering starting a small business setting up home computers and networks. In this day and age, people buy computers (often more than one,) but don't how to set them up or connect them to each other. you could start with just a few flyers. Just a 

suggestion.




Please Rate This Post at the Top!
 

Companies that Hire Ex-offenders and Felons





Felon with experience needs a Job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!


Felon with experience needs a Job

 

Felon with experience needs a Job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | IT Jobs for Felons

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Thursday, May 11, 2017

Felon may need legal help to get a job

Felon may need legal help to get a job

 Felons Wanting to Start Over Struggle to Re-Enter Society
I am currently seeking my Bachelors and soon to be my Masters in the Field of Psychology. I was hoping to become a Clinical Psychologist however I was wondering if there are any laws that prohibit a felon that was convicted of a Violent crime (Vehicular Homicide Disregard to the safety of others) from working in this field. If I can not do Clinical Psychology is there a possibility in the Research side of Psychology. I am currently living out of the country but hope to be moving back with my husband as I begin my masters in 2011. I know that Medical field is generally out for violent criminals but it has been 7 years since I was convicted and 5 years since I finished all my Probation and jail time. Do I have any hope of finding a position in Clinical Psychology in the United States or should I focus on Research Psychology...?


Felon may need legal help to get a job



Hello,

Obtaining a job in your field depends on whether you can be licensed or certified. I suggest you contact the licensing board in your state to see if your conviction will be an obstacle.

Felon may need legal help to get a job
Often ex-offenders and felons need a little legal assistance in their search for jobs. I have had students with Vehicular Homicide convictions downgraded to Aggravated Assault which is a lot easier to work with. Contact an attorney to see if this is an option in your state.

I hope this helps.




Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Truth About Background Checks

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
Felon may need legal help to get a job

Felon may need legal help to get a job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

  Felon may need legal help to get a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Legal Help for Felons

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Wednesday, April 19, 2017

Felon wants job as firefighter

Felon wants job as firefighter

Felon wants job as firefighter

Man fulfills dream of becoming

FDNY probie after 18-year bid

Hello,

I came across your website and I need some guidance for my boyfriend. He has a felony he got when he was 17 for a drug charge. He completed his time and now hes 25 years and has been doing great. He's a car salesman but he works a lot and we have a little boy with whom he wants to spend more time with. He would love to be a firefighter. Or something of the sort... I know his felony stops him from doing a lot but he really has changed. We live in Texas? Do have any suggestions or know anyone we can speak to? We just need to figure out where to start.

Diana,


Felon wants job as firefighter

Hello Diana,

Your boyfriend has a job so he is ahead of the game.  The best time to find a job is when you already have one.

I do know of ex-offenders and felons who have gotten jobs as firefighters. The decision to hire individuals rest upon the respective municipalities. I suggest your boyfriend inquire with the jurisdiction he wishes to serve in as to his eligibility.

Felon wants job as firefighterhe should speak to the firefighters themselves to find out how they got to where they are.  As I also suggest to ex-offenders and felons who want to work for the public is to contact elected officials and ask for information. He should express his desire to be employed and once again become a productive member of society. Elected officials have staff members that answer letters and respond to inquiries from citizens. Officials that could offer assistance are: Mayors, Council Members, Commissioners, Aldermen, Board Members, Assemblymen, and Judges. He should not ask for a job. He should only ask for suggestions about how someone like him could be a firefighter.

I hope this helps.


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Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon wants job as firefighter

Felon wants job as firefighter

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

 

Felon wants job as firefighter


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Monday, April 17, 2017

Do felons list “Deferred Probation” on Job Applications?

Do felons list “Deferred Probation” on Job Applications?

I have a previous misdemeanor assault on a family member on my record. I currently on probation deferred for assault on a family member that is classifies as a felony. Do I list the felony on an application, even though I am on deferred probation? I read somewhere that the felony charge will not show up on a background check. How accurate is that? I reside in Houston, Texas. I do have an advantage, I served honorable in the military for six years. I am now in the Inactive Ready Reserve. My obligation will end in two years. I need advice on what to put on an application. How do I explain myself while in an interview?

Thank you,

Ramiro


 Do felons list “Deferred Probation” on Job Applications?




Hello Ramiro,

Your question not easily answered and I can see how that can affect a felon job search. Deferred adjudication, withheld adjudication, deferred probation all fall into the same basic category.  In most cases, adjudication is withheld pending some other action, usually successful completion of the terms. These terms are typically a fine and probation.  If you successfully complete the terms, in most cases the charges are dismissed. When you complete the terms you will be given a document declaring the charges dismissed.

Do felons list “Deferred Probation” on Job Applications?My suggestion to you is to contact the prosecutor or court officer that is assigned to to your case and inquire if the charge was indeed dismissed.  If it was dismissed, you can answer "no" to the conviction question. This is not intended as legal advice, just information.  For more detailed information as it relates to deferment in your state, you should get help from a qualified legal professional.  I suggest your local legal aid office.  You should be able to get low-cost, probably no-cost assistance.

I hope this helps.

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 Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where Felons can Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record

 

 
Companies that Hire Ex-offenders and Felons

Do felons list “Deferred Probation” on Job Applications?

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Do felons list “Deferred Probation” on Job Applications?


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Deferred Adjudication | Deferred Judgement

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Wednesday, April 12, 2017

Mom of a felon wants to help him get a job

Mom of a felon wants to help him get a job

Mom of a felon wants to help him get a job

Back to Jail: Addiction, mental illness,

joblessness pave path back to prison     

Hi my son was charged with 5 counts of grand theft.  He happened to have drug problems.  He went through a court options program and completed.  I am in process of getting charges expunged.   In the meantime can't get job.  All places check records. He is 22 and now is very sad we put him in rehab and is drug free for 7 months now don't want this to head him back to drugs! Any suggestions?





Mom of a felon wants to help him get a job


Your son should be proud that he has the kind of family who is strong enough to exhibit the type of tough love that he needs. Many of the felons and ex-offenders I deal with do not have that type of support.

In relation to his convictions, five counts of grand theft is not the worst case I've had to deal with. He probably will not have a chance at jobs that any kind of valuables will be at risk. I suggest he try getting a job through a temporary agency. Temporary agencies are a great way to quickly get back into the working world. Many employers use agencies to try out new employees before hiring them. Good workers are hard to find. If an employer sees that he is hard working, punctual and fit in well, he may offer the job permanently. Some other advantages to using a temporary employment service:

 Mom of a felon want to help him get a job
He can try different types of work and develop new skills which can be used later.

He can make new contacts.

Build a work history.

Earn a wage until you can find permanent employment.

He probably will have better success looking for small independent agencies that have fewer hiring restrictions than larger national companies and are free to hire anyone they choose. He will be able to get a list of these agencies in your local phone directory.

He can also go to your local One-Stop Career Center.   Each state has a network of centers that offer a variety of free services that can get him ready for work and assist him in finding employment. In addition, these centers offer training programs that may prepare him for a career.

Some services available are:

Career planning and counseling (often counselors have experience in assisting ex-offenders and felons)

Resume Writing, Interviewing Skills

Computers with internet access and word processing

Daily access to thousands of job listings Job postings and referrals Printers, fax machines, phones, and copiers for job search use

You can your nearest One-Stop Career Center on the web at www.servicelocator.org I hope this helps.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record


Mom of a felon want to help him get a job

Mom of a felon want to help him get a job

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Mom of a felon wants to help him get a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record 

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