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Showing posts with label jobs that hire felons. Show all posts
Showing posts with label jobs that hire felons. Show all posts

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance

Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance Latosha Poston says she made a lot of mistakes in her life. Her legal troubles began in her teens after her first child was born in Indianapolis. Over the years, bad decisions led to some arrests, some convictions.
Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Media

Latosha Poston says she made a lot of mistakes in her life. Her legal troubles began in her teens after her first child was born in Indianapolis. Over the years, bad decisions led to some arrests, some convictions.

"Sometimes we get stuck in our past and let our past guide us," she says.

The 44-year-old has worked hard to straighten out her life. But her criminal records — all involving misdemeanors — continued to haunt her as she tried to find a decent job and place to live.

Then, while watching the local news, she heard about Indiana's Second Chance law, passed in 2013. It allows people to petition to remove their misdemeanor convictions and arrests from public view.

Indiana is among several states to change their approach to the restoration of a person's rights and status after an arrest or conviction. In the last two years, more than 20 states have expanded or added laws to help people move on from their criminal records — most involve misdemeanors. Marijuana legalization and decriminalization have played a big role in driving these reforms. Fairness is another factor, with lawmakers from both parties rethinking the long-term consequences of certain criminal records, as well as the economic impact of mass incarceration.

There are also purely economic reasons to encourage the sealing of criminal records.

"It hurts communities, it hurts counties and it hurts states if their citizens cannot be productively employed or aren't part of the tax base," says American University law professor Jenny Roberts, who has written extensively on the collateral consequences of convictions. "So there's certainly an economic incentive for allowing people to move beyond their criminal record."

The state-level reforms have helped tens of thousands of people across the United States.

Poston of Indianapolis is among them. After working in home health care for nearly 20 years and making just over $11 an hour, she landed a much better-paying job in a hospital as an operating room assistant once her records were sealed.

"I felt like something was lifted off," she says of her case. "Because now I kind of felt like a human."

With background checks ubiquitous for jobs, schools, mortgage applications and more, even one conviction — and sometimes even just one arrest — can dog people for years, critics say, relegating them to permanent second-class status.

"No one should underestimate how much even the most minor of misdemeanor convictions — including marijuana or trespassing or any kind of conviction — can affect someone's ability to get a job, to get housing and to function fully in society," says Roberts, who also co-directs the Criminal Justice Clinic at American University in Washington, D.C.

Time for change

The reform trend reflects an emerging consensus that the social and economic problems created by mass prosecution and incarceration call for a fundamental reimagining of the criminal justice system.

While reformers largely welcome the moves by states, there's concern that a patchwork of laws as well as steep legal fees, prosecutorial foot-dragging and other barriers have blunted what is otherwise seen as a rare area of bipartisan, effective reform.


Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance
The Expungement Help Desk in Indianapolis helps people with criminal records file petitions to get their records expunged or sealed.
Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Media
"The states are really all over the map on this stuff, and they're all reinventing the wheel," says attorney Margaret Love, executive director of the Collateral Consequences Resource Center and an expert on clemency and restoration of rights.

She and others are calling on the National Conference of State Legislatures, the National Center for State Courts and the American Bar Association to study and share what reforms are showing the most promising outcomes.

"Right now it's getting harder for state legislatures to pick out a single approach," Love says. "We have to start looking at this in a more systematic way and look at what works best."

For example, there's a growing body of evidence that it undermines public safety if you don't help people move beyond their criminal records and participate in the workforce. Without that help, the chance of people returning to the criminal justice system increases.

One study estimates that the unemployment rate for formerly incarcerated people is more than 27 percent — far higher than the total U.S. unemployment rate during any historical period, including the Great Depression. The rate is even higher for African-Americans who've had run-ins with the law.

With the national jobless rate at historical lows, many companies are looking at new ways to hire additional workers. A recent survey showed that more than 80 percent of managers — and two-thirds of human resource professionals — "feel that the value workers with criminal records bring to the organization is as high as or higher than that of workers without records."

Indiana's example

As in many other states, the work of sealing and expungement in Indiana mostly falls to nonprofit legal groups and private attorneys. But in Marion County, the prosecutor's office has hired a full-time paralegal to process all requests. The county has had more than 11,500 people come through since legislators implemented the law.

While the mood nationally surrounding expungement has dramatically improved, some prosecutors and judges remain skeptical or outright opposed to records clearing. Philosophically they don't think those who've broken the law should get a clean slate.

So it helps a lot that in Marion County, which encompasses Indianapolis, Prosecutor Terry Curry fully supports the effort. He advocated for the law because he thinks people who've stayed out of trouble shouldn't carry the legal stain forever.

"If our goal is to have individuals not reoffend, then in our mind it's appropriate to remove obstacles that are going to inhibit their ability to become productive members of our community," Curry says.

While most cases in Indiana involve misdemeanors, judges have discretion with violent-felony petitions. Victims of those crimes also can give testimony. More serious felonies can be expunged eight or 10 years after the completion of the sentence.

Some crimes must have the prosecutor's written consent for expungement. Homicides and some sexual offenses are not eligible for expungement in Indiana and in most other states.

You can petition to have records for convictions expunged only once in your lifetime. If you are convicted of other charges later on, there's no chance of having them sealed.

While the process in Indiana and in other states seems simple, serious hurdles remain. Expungement can be time consuming and costly. There are filing fees for every petition — fees not everyone can afford.

In addition, the process can vary from county to county depending on cooperation from local prosecutors. Advocates in Indiana want lawmakers to make it easier for people to expunge their records — regardless of where they are in the state.

Getting the word out

Even more vexing — in Indiana and throughout the country — is the general ignorance about existing expungement laws. People just don't know they exist or how they work.

Public defenders from New York to Los Angeles say they have to do a better job of both getting the word out and pushing states to better fund these efforts.

At a recent LA-area expungement clinic, a man showed up who'd done significant prison time for a nonviolent felony. And he'd been off probation for more than five years. He still couldn't get a job. The man, who didn't want his name used, thought at first the expungement clinic was some kind of scam.

"He had no idea he could not only get it [the felony] expunged but reduced to a misdemeanor," says Los Angeles County Deputy Public Defender Lara Kislinger, who was helping him with the paperwork. "He just had no idea. And he was so grateful. And he's been having so much trouble finding a job. And we want people to be able to re-enter society and be productive members of society. And this was a case where it was so obvious it was holding up jobs — and life. And it's tragic."

Expanding public knowledge of sealing and expungement laws takes money and effort. Many public defender offices already are overwhelmed, understaffed and underresourced.

How long should a record last?

Across the nation, felonies are harder to expunge and involve longer waiting periods, and in many states, homicides and certain sexual offenses are almost impossible to expunge.
Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance
Jay Jordan, 33, is the director of the #TimeDone/Second Chances project for the nonprofit Californians for Safety and Justice. The clinic involves public defenders who volunteer to help people get their criminal charges or records reduced or expunged.
Philip Cheung for NPR
There's a new push in some states to clear some felony convictions, especially nonviolent ones.

California has taken the lead in reducing incarceration and prosecution of certain low-level drug crimes and nonviolent felonies following the passage of Proposition 47 and other measures. Past offenders can petition a court to reduce their crimes to misdemeanors.

Supporters say it has helped reduce the prison population and racial disparities in the justice system while saving taxpayers money. Funds are redirected, for example, into support services such as drug treatment and counseling.

Others say Proposition 47, while a good start, is inadequate. Jay Jordan of Los Angeles served seven years in prison for robbery. He has been out now for nearly eight years and says he still faces daunting obstacles to full re-entry into society.

"You know, I tried to adopt and was turned down. Tried to volunteer at school and was turned down. Tried [to] sell insurance, was turned down. Tried to sell used cars, was turned down. So, you know, every single step of the way when I try to better myself and, you know, be able to take care of myself for my family, there are these massive barriers," Jordan says. "And I'm not alone."

Indeed, there are some 8 million formerly incarcerated people in California. In the U.S., it's estimated that there are some 60 million people with a criminal record, according to federal statistics. The majority are misdemeanors. One report estimates as many people have criminal records as college diplomas.

Jordan now works for a nonprofit that advocates for rights of the formally incarcerated. In their work, Jordan and others are asking the basic question — how long should these convictions be on people's records if they've done their time and are working to become good citizens?

Not everyone wants these reforms. In California, some want to roll back parts of the state's criminal justice reforms through a proposed 2020 ballot initiative that would, among other things, reduce the number of inmates who can seek earlier parole and reclassify some theft crimes from misdemeanors to felonies.

"Proposition 47 was approved overwhelmingly by California voters who understood that permanently punishing people for a past mistake is not reflective of our shared American values nor is it an effective safety strategy," says Jordan, who directs Californians for Safety and Justice's #TimeDone/Second Chances campaign.

"Everyone who has an old, low-level, nonviolent felony on their record that is eligible for reduction to a misdemeanor under Prop. 47 should be able to get relief, and we want to make that as easy as we possibly can for folks," he says. "People deserve the chance to overcome the mistakes of their past, and that road to redemption should be as smooth as possible."

Some Democratic lawmakers in California are pushing back with proposed legislation that would automate the expungement process for all felonies that are eligible for reduction under the law.

Legal experts like Roberts, the American University law professor, caution that the best solution might be for prosecutors to simply take fewer minor cases to court in the first place.

"I don't think you can have an actual conversation about sealing and expungement and decriminalization until you talk about less prosecution and less funneling of low-level misdemeanors into the criminal justice system," Roberts says.


Companies that hire felons


Explained: Misdemeanors, Felonies, Pardons, and Expungements


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Expungement



Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance




Eric Mayo

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Monday, January 21, 2019

Woman gets second chance with pardon


Woman gets second chance with pardon
Monica An­drade served 16 months in prison starting in 2002, fol­lowed by three years on parole.

Her crime? Man­u­fac­tur­ing a controlled sub­stance for sale, and child endangerment. More specifically, An­dra­de manufactured meth­am­phet­amine while her 13-year-old son was home.

Andrade completed her sentence and set out to change her life. She went to AV-East Kern Second Chance for help.

Michelle Egberts, an ex-felon herself, is founder and executive director of Sec­ond Chance. She ran “ex­pungement” workshops to help ex-felons clear their rec­ords. The two-hour work­shops are packed with information including the barriers people face as they work to clear their record.

“She educates on all the records that are out there,” Andrade said.

Expungement is a court-ordered process that allows an offender to seal or erase the legal record of an arrest or criminal conviction in the eyes of the law.

An individual is eligible for expungement if he or she committed a felony or misdemeanor and was not incarcerated in state prison, has fulfilled his or her probation, and was not convicted of an ineligible crime such as rape or child sexual abuse.

Andrade, 50, served time in prison, so she was not eligible to have her record expunged. But she was eligible for a Certificate of Rehabilitation.

A Certificate of Re­hab­il­itation is available only for people who have gone to prison. They can get it after a certain amount of time if they meet the criteria. If granted, the doc­ument restores some of the rights of citizenship that were forfeited as a result of a felony con­vic­tion. It also acts as an aut­o­matic application and rec­om­mendation for a pardon from the governor.

Andrade attended four or five of Egberts’ work­shops to begin work on get­ting her Certificate of Re­hab­ilitation. She re­ceived the document in December 2016.

“There is an 11-page ques­tionnaire just from the courts, from the DA’s office, that needs to be addressed, and if it’s not addressed cor­rect­ly you’re not going to get your COR,” Egberts said.

The application package includes character refer­en­ces from at least four peop­le who know you went to prison and have turned your life around. Andrade had at least 10 letters of rec­om­mendation. Andrade submitted her application for the pardon, including another seven pages of ques­tions, in August 2017.

Former California Gov. Jerry Brown signed An­drade’s pardon on Nov. 21.

“She’s our first pardon,” Egberts said.

Egberts estimated Sec­ond Chance has helped more than 2,000 people ex­punge their records since 2012.

“Everybody is eligible so I don’t discriminate,” Eg­berts said

However, she noted in­div­iduals who committed crimes such as murder, rape, or kidnapping are not eligible for a certificate of rehabilitation.

Andrade visited Egberts’ Mojave home to talk about her pardon and how she is working toward creating a bet­ter life for herself and her family.

Andrade’s 13-year-old son, Carlos Boquin, is now 30.

“He is my idol because he never gave up on me,” An­drade said.

Boquin continues to help his mother and her two youngest children, his sis­ters, after Andrade’s hus­band was deported back to Guatemala six years ago. She lives with Boquin and his family.

“It was either fall back and go back to my bad ways and repeat history again, or this time, my son said, ‘Mom, I’ll watch the kids, you go to school,’ ” An­dra­de said.

Andrade went to school. She received an associate of arts degree in 2014. She received a bachelor’s de­gree in criminal justice from California State Uni­ver­sity, Bakersfield in 2017.

She is working on her master’s degree in crim­in­al justice at Grand Canyon University. Andrade hopes to become a probation officer in the juvenile div­is­ion for the Los Angeles De­partment of Probation some­day. Her ultimate goal is law school.

“I’ve been through it; I’ve experienced it. So that now I can understand and I can relate, so that if anyone wants to talk to me I can be there for them, “ Andrade said. “That’s my goal — is to be there for someone else, to help someone else.”

Andrade got involved with meth because of a weight problem.

She weighed nearly 300 pounds at one point and was in abusive marriage. She started losing weight with the assistance of a doc­tor who prescribed fen­flur­mine-phentermine, or fen-phen, an anti-obesity treat­ment later found to cause potential fatal heart prob­lems that led to its with­drawal from the mar­ket.

Andrade met drug traf­fick­ers through her for­mer sec­urity job. They in­tro­duced her to meth to help her lose weight. The meth gave Andrade energy that kept her busy cleaning her house and helped keep the weight off. Andrade said she had children and could not go to the gym.

One thing led to another and Andrade eventually start­ed to cook her own meth. That eventually led to prison.

Andrade has seven chil­dren, The two oldest are boys and the rest are girls. At one point her five old­est children were taken away from her. All are now adults. Andrade has seven grand­children.

Andrade did not expect to get her pardon as soon as she did.

“It couldn’t come at a bet­ter time,” Andrade said.

After five years renting the same home, Andrade and her family face evic­tion.

“I don’t make a whole lot of money; none of us do,” she said.

Andrade is concerned that although she has a gov­ernor’s pardon, po­ten­tial landlords might see her rec­ord after a background check and deny her.

The background check will show what Andrade was convicted her and her prison term, along with her Certificate of Re­hab­ilitation and her pardon.

Egberts started AV-East Kern Second Chance with her former partner, Rich­ard Macias, a retired law en­forcement officer with 25 years’ experience. Macias now serves as director em­er­itus.

“Everybody deserves to be rehabilitated,” Egberts said.

Egberts was convicted in 2004 for grand theft. Her case involved more than $100,000.

“I have not been able to fiscally pay off my res­tit­u­tion. But I have done it and more by giving back to my community.” Egberts said.

Egberts is not proud of her crimes. She spent al­most three years in prison. When she left prison, she had a four-year degree in bus­i­ness administration with an understudy in mar­keting.

“Couldn’t find a job for nothing,” Egberts said.

Egberts still has not found a job. She has not cleared her own record.

“I haven’t had time,” she said.

That is because she con­tin­ues to help other felons. She no longer has a place to conduct the workshops, so she works from home. She walked across the room and picked up a package she received in the mail re­cently.

“There’s 13 cases in it from Long Beach,” Egberts said.

They do not make any money from Second Chance. Any money they do get goes toward supplies such as postage and ink.

“We’re looking for a home,” Egberts said.


Woman gets second chance with pardon

Explained: Misdemeanors, Felonies, Pardons, and Expungements




Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Pardons for Felons 

Eric Mayo

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Wednesday, January 2, 2019

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons
List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons

I get a lot of emails about getting a job with a criminal record.  I get quite a few from ex-offenders regarding the list of companies that hire ex-offenders and felons.  We have all seen the list.  It is posted on a number of websites.  I even have a variation of it on this blog here: 

Updated List of Companies That Hire Ex-offenders and Felons 

I have contacted each one of the companies on the list and none of them have official policies that exclude the hiring of ex-offenders.  My list is a little different because it includes companies that have hired students that I have worked with personally.

Many people that read this list are confused.  Just because an employer has hired an ex-offender in the past, does not mean it will hire every ex-offender or felon that applies for employment.  The nature of the conviction of the person applying will come into play.  For example, a person convicted of any type of theft or robbery will not be considered for any type of job where valuables are at risk.  A person with a drug conviction will not be considered for jobs in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes etc.  There maybe even local laws which prohibit those with drug related convictions to be employed anywhere alcohol is served.

Many types of jobs require licenses that people with certain types of convictions are ineligible for. 

I have also met people who have have applied for jobs with some of the employers on the list and come to the conclusion that the employer doesn't hire felons because the employer did not them.  Just by appearance, the person was a poor applicant who just didn't make a good impression or did not fit int what the employer feels a good employee looks like.

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons
Before you apply for any position, you have make sure you put yourself in the best position to be hired.  The first and most important is appearance.

Do you have suitable interview clothes? For men, a well fitting suit with a nice shirt and tie would be the absolute best thing to have. That may not be possible for someone just coming home but I suggest that men at least have dark dress slacks, a light colored shirt and a coordinated tie. You should also have a pair of shoes that you can put some polish on. Not boots, not sneakers…shoes! A good number of my students buy
List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons their interview clothing at thrift stores like Goodwill or the Salvation Army store. They find quality clothes at very low prices, clean and press them and they are ready to interview. Never mind how you get them, the right clothes will make the difference. You should also have a neat haircut and be clean shaven. If you wear a beard, it should be neat and trimmed. How do you look? Do you look like an ex-offender with a shirt and tie or do you look like a businessman? Do you look like you are going to a
List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons
business meeting? You should - an interview is a business meeting. You should always look like a professional who is there to make a business deal! Always dress like you have an interview even to fill out applications.  You will never get a second chance to make a first impression.

Women should wear a classic skirted or pant suit with a light colored blouse or a simple dress that does not come up above the knee.  Do not wear anything too tight or too skimpy.  Be sure to wear coordinated pumps that are neat and clean.  The pantyhose should match the skin with no pattern.

Hair should be neat and of natural color.  A short hairstyle is best, but tastefully done longer hair is fine.  Fingernails should be neatly trimmed with tasteful polish.  The make-up should be natural looking.  One set
List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felonsof earrings (no larger than a quarter) no facial piercings or tongue ornaments, one ring per hand and no more than one bracelet per wrist.  If you have visible tattoos, especially on the neck or face, should be covered by makeup.
  

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felonsDo you have a resume?  A resume will present your skills, past experience and other information in one neat package.  Everyone looking for a job should have a resume.  If you do not have a well written resume, you should do what you have to get one.

How are your interview skills.  Once again, you will have to leave an employer with a good impression of you, so brush up on your interviewing skills

This is a great list and a great opportunity for ex-offenders and felons to get hired for jobs.  Make the most of the opportunity!


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List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons



Jobs for Felons The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)

,

Jobs for Felons: How does a Criminal Record Affect Employment?

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons



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Saturday, December 22, 2018

Five Bottom Line Reasons Why Employers Should Hire Ex-Felons


Mike Green, Contributor
Co-founder, ScaleUp Partners LLC

Five Bottom Line Reasons Why Employers Should Hire Ex-FelonsThere is no city in the nation that’s growing faster than the population of 70 million Americans with criminal records. As one of them, former real estate developer R.L. Pelshaw is determined to turn this costly societal burden into an opportunity. “With criminal records it’s difficult for many ex-offenders to get jobs making a livable wage,” Pelshaw said. “Showing (ex) criminals how to be successful in legal businesses is far better then returning to crime, and will change the destiny of millions of people.” For employers, there exists a real opportunity to disrupt the continuous cycle of quarantining humans. And for the sake of society at large, sustainable employment may not only represent our best opportunity to significantly disrupt recidivism and the growing population of Americans with criminal records, it may be our only option. Consider the costs. Between 1973 and 2009, the nation’s prison population grew by 705 percent. Over the past two decades costs of incarceration have skyrocketed more than 305 percent, according to a 2011 Pew study. States now spend more than $52B out of their budgets (second only to Medicaid), for incarceration. And the economic impact inherent in the process of policing and locking up those who perpetrate crimes in our communities is compounded by the economic impact of high recidivism rates of 84 percent for males, age 24 years and younger. This revolving door is fueled by a pipeline that has grown exponentially over the past several decades to the point where the United States incarcerates more of its population than any nation in the world. America’s employers must take note of what happens to released inmates when they re-enter society, often after years of being quarantined, and with little hope of finding employment that funds a new path to productive citizenship. In 2012, more than 630,000 inmates were released into targeted communities across America. According to the latest study by the Bureau of Justice, three of every four released prisoners were re-arrested within the five-year life of the study. An extraordinarily high percentage (89 percent) of ex-felons re-arrested were unemployed. Pelshaw is determined to change that. He launched and self-funded a campaign called, The National Hire Ex-Felons Campaign, designed to inform employers of the benefits of tapping into this 70-million-strong workforce. Of course, there are plenty of unemployed people who do not commit crimes. The suggestion is not that employment alone is a panacea for this national problem. But, there is no other immediate option to developing sustainable financial stability for ex-felons. The longer that former inmates remain unemployed following release, the greater the risk they will seek income through alternative means. Their fate impacts the fate of families, communities and ultimately society at large. Employment is one of the tools we have to address this growing problem. Those who pay their debt to society and emerge from prison with a new perspective and lease on life deserve an opportunity to earn a living. They represent a class of prospective employees unlike any other. But, why should employers assume the risk of hiring ex-felons? You may be surprised by these five fact-based, bottom line reasons. Hiring Incentives: Finding good help is a key factor in running a successful business. Too many employers get robbed daily by lazy employees who work with a sense of entitlement, watching the clock, anticipating that moment they can break free of the bonds that trap them in cubicles, offices and warehouses. Many daydream of weekend getaways and play-cations while robotically moving through tasks, diluting the level of worker productivity. Ex-felons are no stranger to hard work. And they are grateful for the opportunity to earn a living. Most believe they have something to prove to their families and employers. But there are additional bottom line incentives to employees who hire former inmates. Substantial tax credits are available for hiring ex-felons, such as the Federal Work Opportunity Tax Credit. Some states even provide partial wage reimbursement, additional tax credits, and other training funds for employers who hire ex-felons.
“We’ve had three (subsidies) that amount to several hundreds of thousands of dollars to bear down on training our employees,” said Mike Hannigan, CEO of Give Something Back. “It’s amazing to me how many resources are available to a company.” Employers who hire felons can also be eligible to obtain a free fidelity bond funded by the federal government to protect them against employee dishonesty or theft. More importantly, credible studies clearly indicate that ex-felons out of prison seven years or more have no higher rate of committing a crime than non-felons. A 2009 University of Maryland study found that people with a criminal record are at no greater criminal risk after they’ve been out seven to 10 years than those with no record. Employee Reliability: Few things hurt a business more than high turnover rates. Employers who spend too much time with a focus on hiring employees who won’t leave shortly thereafter find themselves neglecting other areas of the business that require attention. Ex-felons have far fewer options than conventional employees. Due to the scarcity of opportunities for ex-felons, many employers that hire them have lower turnover than with conventional hires. According to the Partnership for Safety and Justice, many ex-felons have a favorable employment and educational history. “In general, formerly incarcerated people are as reliable as other workers,” the report states, citing numerous studies. Hiring Opportunity: The landscape of employable ex-felons is large. Ex-offenders on probation often have to maintain employment as a condition of release. Most parolees are drug-tested by their probation officer or halfway house at no expense to employers. Most parole officers and halfway houses welcome contact with employers of supervised felons. That supervision de-risks the employment opportunity and is an added value at no cost to the employer. An estimated 6.9 million persons were under supervision of adult correctional systems in 2013, according to the Bureau of Justice. This is a significant, largely untapped and motivated work force. A 2008 study by the Urban Institute Justice Policy Center found that fewer than 45 percent of felons were employed eight months after being released. In real numbers that means more than 3.5 million prospective workers are available for hire. Economic Impact: Employers can make a considerable difference in transforming a criminal liability into a community asset. Unemployed ex-felons are at a greater risk of re-offending compared to employed ex-felons. Many ex-felons turn to crime and return to jail (recidivism) because they can’t find a job paying a livable wage.
“People who break the law need to be held accountable and pay their debt to society,” said Adam Gelb, director of the Pew Center on the States’ Public Safety Performance Project. “At the same time, the collateral costs of locking up 2.3 million people are piling higher and higher.” According to VERA institute of Justice, the U.S. spends nearly40 billion a year to house inmates. The average cost per state to house one inmate is31,286 per year. But if that one felon gets a job instead of returning to prison, he or she now contributes to the economy by more than $10,000 a year, according to a Baylor University study. Crime Market Disruption: An estimated 70 million U.S. adults have arrest or conviction records based on Bureau of Justice statistics. Tougher sentencing laws, especially for drug offenses, have swelled that total. Society can’t afford to simply banish 70 million people from the workplace. Children of incarcerated adults are the highest at-risk group in America. Many follow in their parents’ footsteps, continuing the cycle of crime and fueling a criminal market pipeline. Children of felons are seven times more likely to be incarcerated themselves. They are more likely (23 percent vs 4 percent) to be expelled or suspended from school than other children.
And the criminal market isn’t just isolated to minority populations. Across the nation, 40 percent of young men (regardless of race) will have a police-record encounter before the age of 23. Of those incarcerated, 84 percent will return to prison. It’s a continuous criminal market cycle that costs taxpayers more than $52 billion a year and threatens the stability of families and communities, in particular those already suffering from economic distress. Employing an ex-felon can disrupt the cycle of this criminal market and provides an opportunity to restore stability to families through a solid financial footing. “To fight the vicious circle of crime and recidivism we need to create ways offenders, ex-offenders, those at risk to offend, and those living off crime (but not yet caught) can make money legitimately,” said Pelshaw, who is also the author of Illegal to Legal: Business Success for (ex) Criminals. With more than 630,000 inmates released into neighborhoods across America every year, the community of ex-felons released each year is larger than the population of many major cities. Employers are already discovering the challenges of finding good employees without criminal records. Perhaps it’s time employers considered the benefits of hiring good employees who happen to be ex-felons. Originally seen at Huffingtonpost.com: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/mike-green/five-bottom-line-reasons-_b_8021476.html



Five Bottom Line Reasons Why Employers Should Hire Ex-Felons

Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons 




Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Eric Mayo


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Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Criminal history questions on job applications could soon become illegal

Criminal history questions on job applications could soon become illegal

Posted: Sep 18, 2017 3:50 PM EDTUpdated: Sep 18, 2017 10:19 PM EDT
If the employer plans on denying an applicant based on their conviction history, the bill would require the employer to do an individualized review of whether or not their history would have a direct and adverse relationship with the specific duties of the job.
They would have to consider three stipulations: the nature of the offense, the time that has passed between the offense and sentence completion, and the nature of the job.
The employer would have to notify the person applying with a written decision, and the applicant is allowed five business days to respond, and an additional five days to dispute the decision with evidence.
There are some companies that require background checks by law, so they would be exempt from this bill if it becomes a law, according to Eppright.
Nine states and 15 cities, including San Francisco and Los Angeles, have adopted similar regulations.



Companies that Hire Ex-offenders and Felons


 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Ban the Box


Eric Mayo

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Tuesday, August 1, 2017

How Felons Can Land Jobs Today

How Felons Can Land Jobs Today


How Felons Can Land Jobs Today
Finding a job in this day and age is different than it was even five years ago.  The computer age has changed the way we look for and apply for jobs.  Felons looking for jobs face different challenges than other job seekers.  By using some different techniques, felons can dramatically increase their job opportunities.  Take a look at these tips and your next job will not be far away.

Get out and Network

Asking people you already know about jobs that may be open is called networking.  This is the single most powerful way to get job leads.  In fact, most people get their jobs this way.  Networking is works so well because many employers will take a good a look at people who are referred to them.

How many categories of people do you know?  This a big group of people who can provide you with a lot of quality job leads.

Friends
People in the neighborhood
How Felons can Land Jobs TodayParole/probation officers
Relatives
Members of your worship group (especially religious leaders)
Former co- workers
Other Former Inmates
Former teachers
Former employers
Classmates
Casual acquaintances
People you do business with (Barber, landlord, doctors)


This is eleven categories of people.  Let's say you got five job leads from people in each category. That is a possible 55 high quality leads for jobs.  That would be a great start for your job search.  This the single most powerful way to get a job and it how most people find jobs

Get a Professional Looking Email

How Felons Can Land Jobs Today
Your email address should have a professional look.  Employers will probably take more seriously if you have a professional looking email address.  You may want to one that uses your first and last name separated by a period, followed by the two numbers of your date of birth  ex: richard.jenkins21@mail.com


Clean Up Your Social Media

How Felons Can Land Jobs Today
Clean up your social media
With the popularity of social media, it would be difficult to find a lot of people who are not using some form of it. More and more, employers are checking social media pages to get a better idea of
who they are considering.  So take a good look at your social media profile or page.  Is there anything that leave a bad taste of an employer's mouth?  You may want to remove it.  That means any objectionable pictures, posts or videos.

Apply for Every Job You are Qualified for

How felons can land jobs today
Too many felons miss out on jobs simply because they don't apply.  Felons get jobs everyday.  Don't assume that you will not be hired because you have a record.  Never talk yourself out of a job.  What you must understand that the numbers on on your side when it comes to getting a job with a criminal record.  More applications, will lead to more interviews.  More interviews will lead to more opportunities to get hired.  Make a goal of a certain number applications each week and stick to it. Every application you fill out will take you one step closer to getting a job.

Get Professional Looking Interview Clothing

The choice of clothing you wear to an interview will have a huge impact on your chances to get hired.  Remember you are not going to a nightclub or a party.  An interview is a business meeting and you should look like you are ready for business.  Your clothes will create an image or perception of the type of person you are, so choosing your look is critical to presenting yourself as a professional.  It doesn't matter what position you apply for, you should present yourself as a professional.

Men

Men should should wear a dark suit, a light shirt, a tie and shoes that can be shined.  If a suit is
How Felons Can Land Jobs Today
unavailable, dark slacks, light colored shirt, a tie and once again, shoes that can be shined.

Women

The ideal look is a classic business suit (either slacks or skirt,) a light colored blouse and coordinated shoes with a medium or low heel.  Earrings should be small. Nail polish and makeup should be natural looking and tasteful.

Not everyone has clothing like described above, but it is important to get them.  How you look will definitely influence an employer.  If finances are an issue, you may want to look into thrift stores to find appropriate interview clothing.  At thrift stores you will find suits, slacks, shirts, ties and shoes at very affordable prices.

Need Interview Clothes? Ex offenders and Felons Should try Thrift Stores

No matter where you find your clothing, clean and neatly pressed clothing will give you the professional look and help you make a good impression.

When looking for a job, dress like you are going to an interview

I encourage ex-offenders and felons to dress like you are going on an interview whenever you go out filling out applications.  You never know who you are going to meet on your job search.  It's always better to be prepared for an opportunity and not have one, than to have an opportunity and not be prepared.

Make a list of your skills 

How Felons Can Land Jobs Today
Make a list of all of your skills and be able to talk about each one.  Make a list your skills and practice talking about them.  The better you can explain you value, the better your chances to get hired. The skills you should focus on are:



Work-specific Skills

These are skills that were acquired by working at a particular jobs.  Can you paint, cook, use tools or perform other types of work?  The skills you used to perform on a job are all examples of work-specific skills.

Transferable Skills

These are skills that can be taken from one type of job and used in other types of work.  Typing, use of office equipment, and telephone skills are all examples of transferable skills.

Personal Skills

These are skills that are part of your personality that helps you do other things well.  Are you a punctual person?  Do you work well under pressure?  Do you work well with customers?  These are all personal skills.

These are three types of skills you can sell to an employer.  If you can easily talk about your skills and how they can benefit an employer, you can get job, even with a criminal record

Follow Up

Follow up with everyone you meet on your job search.  If you fill out an application, find out the name and phone number of the hiring person.  If you get an interview, always get the business card of the person you interview with. The business card will have the interviewer's name, title, address, phone number  and email address.  Right after the interview, you may want to send a thank you email.  If you really want to stand out, you could even send a thank you card.

Get Good References

Having a few good references may be the difference that could get you hired. Have a list reputable who would say something positive about you make a list of five great references.  A reference may look like this:
How Felons Can Land Jobs Today
Mr. David O'Bannion
Vice President, Marketing
XYZ Company
922 N. Bank St.
Chicago, IL 60610
312-555-3222

References should never be included on your resume.  They should be listed on a separate sheet and only be submitted upon request.  Before you use anyone as a reference, you should ask their permission.

Use your One-stop Career Center

How Felons Can Land Jobs Today
Every ex-offender or felon looking for a job should visit their local One-stop Career Center.  You will find many resources that can help you find a job or get training for a new career.  You may get personal assistance from trained employment counselors.  You can get help writing a resume, learn interviewing techniques and find lists of open jobs in your community.  Click this link to find your local One-stop Career Center  One-stop Career  Centers



How felons can land jobs today



 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | One-stop Career Center | Real Jobs for Felons

Eric Mayo

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Friday, June 3, 2016

Felon wants Job as an Addiction Counselor

Felon wants job as an Addiction Counselor



 Felon wants job as an Addiction Counselor
Dear Sir or Madam,

I came across this email on your website as I am looking for ways to help my adult son.  He is a heroin addict in recovery.  He wants to become an addiction counselor, but we are struggling to find someone to get advice from.  He is very intelligent and has a bachelor's in psych.  He wants to get his MS and applied to the program at our local university, but was turned down based on the felony, telling him they don't want him to end up with more student loans, as the licensing bd in Ohio will not grant him a license. He is very depressed, feeling that he will never be able to do what he wants to do.

He has of course had great difficulty finding any work.  He was just hired to do heavy lifting in a warehouse for low pay.  He's worked there a week, and has put in 50 hours.  He's 28, with back and foot problems, and has been coming home in great pain.  This has added to the feeling that he will never get a good job, will never be able to live on his own, marry one day, and support a family.  It doesn't help that he has a brother who is an attorney, and a sister in medical school. He would be happy to get a lesser job as a case aid or similar position so that he can prove himself.

He tells me he has heard of other drug counselors who were felons, but we can't find one for him to talk to. There is little hope of having his record expunged because he has two misdemeanor charges for behavior when he was using (non violent) , plus the felony for use.  That excludes you from expungement in Ohio.  Do you have any suggestions?

Thank you,

Trying to help without enabling,

Demi


Felon wants job as an Addiction Counselor

 

Hello Demi,

I know of  addiction counselors who have criminal records, but that is here in NJ.  My suggestion is to contact the local United Way.  The United Way supports an array of social assistance programs.  Perhaps they can refer you to a rehab center they are affiliated with.  Your son could probably
Felon wants job as an Addiction Counselor volunteer a few hours per week to acquaint himself with the facility and work with counselors.  I am sure he will meet someone who could steer him in the right direction.  He could possibly find employment opportunities within one of the agencies the United Way supports.

I hope this helps





Felon wants Job as an Addiction Counselor


Felon wants job as an Addiction Counselor


Eric Mayo

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