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Showing posts with label hire felons. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hire felons. Show all posts

Monday, September 30, 2019

Expungement could help felons get Jobs

 Expungement could help felons get Jobs

Expungement could help felons get Jobs


Hello Sir:

I was convicted of felony in 2009 for possession and delivery of narcotics, I served 26 months and everything has been well for me until 2019. I have been having a hard time getting a job in my field of study, which is computer science. I am enclosing my resume so that you can take a look at all of the places I have worked, but can't seem to find work because of the intense background checks now. ONE Conviction 21 Years ago man it's hard. 

Please Advise. 

Thank you.



 Expungement could help felons get Jobs




Hello Jason,

Looking at your background, your inability to find work may be due to other factors. Some convictions are more difficult to work with than others.  Take a look at the first video below.  It will give you an idea of what I mean.  

For many ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, expungement may help. Expungement will not erase your conviction but it may keep it off of the average background check. You can find more information here:

http://courts.michigan.gov/scao/selfhelp/intro/criminal/setaside_help.htm


I would not attempt this alone. You may be able to get low-cost or even low-cost assistance at your local legal aid office.


I hope this helps




Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2019)





Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Expungement could help felons get Jobs

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Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Can felons go to college and get jobs?

Can felons go to college and get jobs

Hello,

I came across your website and have gotten some helpful feedback. However, in my situation I am a 21 year old female convicted of felony possession and attempted transportation of marijuana for sale. I'm currently on supervised probation. Expungement is not an early option for at least another 6 months to a year. And even though I'm a first time offender, I think my record is now showing up and I've been denied jobs for the first time in my life. I had to drop out of college because I couldn't afford it just weeks after I caught my case back in 2014 and then convicted and served time in 2015. I was attending a top 100 four-year university majoring in chemical engineering with the pre-med option. I want to change my major to nursing and consider med school later. What are my options as far as employment for the next several months and what are your thoughts on my options for school and funding thereafter?

Can felons go to college and get jobs?


Hello,

Can felons go to college and get jobs?
Even though expungement may not be an option, you may be able to get a downgrade of your charge. That may make it easier to work with. Speak to an attorney in your local legal aid office to see if this is an option in your state. Even with expungement,  your conviction will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies. The only issue may be, if the jobs you want require any certification or licensing.  As I encourage all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, apply for every job you feel you qualify for.

One thing I teach my students looking for professional jobs, is to apply by sending their resumes with well written cover. letters.  Often when they apply this way, the question of criminal records never comes up.  If it does, they should be prepared to talk about their convictions in a positive way.

Your local One-stop career center may help you get a job. you can find the center nearest to you at this link:

www.servicelocator.org

Can felons go to college and get jobs?In reference to going to college, I have numerous students who have gone on to college careers. There are some points of consideration. Some jobs may require certification or licensing. Be sure your conviction will not forbid you from being certified or licensed in your state. Also regarding getting federal financial aid for college, I know of felons and ex-offenders who were able to get grants and loans for education and later on jobs. Speak to someone in the financial aid office of the school you wish to attend. They will help you get the necessary forms. Unfortunately not everybody convicted of a felony is eligible. Certain drug convictions require that you complete an accepted drug rehabilitation program in order to be eligible for federal financial aid. Just something to consider.

Doors are opening for ex-offenders and felons not only for jobs but access to higher education.  If you are not only looking for employment, but looking for a college education. Take a look at this article:


Jobs for Felons: Government Help For Felons Looking for Jobs
I hope this helps.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and felons: Sending Resumes and Cover Letters


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Truth About Background Checks

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
Can felons go to college and get jobs?


Can felons go to college and get jobs?


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | College for felons | Second Chance Jobs

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Monday, June 3, 2019

Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life

Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life



Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life
I work with people with criminal records who want to get jobs and turn their lives around.  I tell them that there are three things they must change to put their pasts behind them.  The have to change the places they go, change the things they do and most importantly change the people they spend time with.

No matter how hard you work to get your life in order, certain types of people will drain energy from you and in the end will ruin all of your efforts.  If you want to give yourself the best opportunity for success, you must remove these types of people from your life:


1. Haters

These people are never happy for anyone - including YOU!  They never encourage anyone or happy about anyone else's success.  They may be your friend, but they will not be happy if you are successful.  In fact they will probably have something negative to say or devalue whatever you accomplish.

2.  Manipulators

Manipulators are very sneaky.  They pretend to be friends.  They may know a lot about you and use what they know to get you to do what they want.

3.  Unreliable People

These people never show up on time, never do what they say they will do and know matter how many favors you have done for them, always have an excuse when you need a favor from them.

4.  People who love to Argue

These people will argue with anyone, anywhere, about anything.  They don't even have to know what they are talking about, they will argue.  It you say something is up, they will say its down.  These people will drain your energy and bring you down every time.

5.  Gossips

These people talk about other people all of time.  They can't help themselves.  They will even try to involve you in their gossiping.   Because they can't help themselves, they will also talk about you, when you aren't around.


6. Time Wasters

These people usually have no goals and very little going for them so they have no sense of time.  Because they have no sense of time, they have no problem with wasting yours.  They may try to have you join them playing video games or talking about thing that really have no value.  When you look up, you have wasted valuable time that you could have devoted to doing something positive.

7. Drama Queens and Kings

These people always bring drama wherever they go.  They always have some type of negativity going on at all times.  They do not get along with others and have often start the nonsense.  Be careful you might one day become part of the drama.

8.  Naysayers

These are people who are constantly tell you what cannot be done.  They will always tell you why you shouldn't do something rather than the good things that could happen.  If you let them, they will attempt to crush your dreams and goals.

9. Victims

These people constantly talk about what life has done to them or how someone has done them wrong.  They never talk about what they are doing to make the situation better.  They just complain and wallow in self-pity.

10. Dishonest People

These are the people who lie, cheat and steal on a regular basis.  Dishonest people always will have trouble because they are not to be trusted.  Who wants to be around people that cannot trust?


Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life



If you are trying to build a new life for yourself, eliminate these people.  The more time you spend with them, their habits and attitude will slowly rub off on you.

You deserve to have positive, supportive and loving people in your life. Getting rid of some people is addition by subtraction.  In fact, life is too short to spend time with people who do not want you to succeed or help you to be better.  Not everyone in your life is meant to stay there.


companies that hire felons



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life

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Friday, May 3, 2019

Felon with college education needs a job

Felon with college education needs a job


Felon with college education needs a job
My husband has a felony, the charge is lewd and lascivious. It was an incident that happened about 6 years ago before we met. He had a drinking problem at the time and has not drank any alcohol in the past 5 years. After serving 7 months in prison for this crime he got out and went back to school.

He started at a community college and went on to be accepted to the Kansas University school of business and graduated with a degree in accounting with distinction which is no small feat! He graduated in December of '16 and has since been unable to find a job in his field.

He has had one offer that was later taken back after seeing his charge on paper and several interviews for jobs where I know he would have got them if it weren't for this charge. We tried to get it expunged but were unsuccessful. The judge did say we should try again later as he wasn't saying no forever. My husband is becoming increasingly disappointed and losing hope. He is a great, intelligent and changed man.

What more can we do?


Felon with college education needs a job



My suggestion is to apply for jobs by letter of application. By applying for jobs this way often allows ex-offenders and felons to get around the application process and never have to mention that he has a criminal record.  Many professional job seekers never fill out applications.  They send application letters to employers.  Take a look at the sample letter below.  It will give you an idea of how to put an application letter together.






































Perhaps the best advice I can give anyone looking for a job, is to apply for all jobs you are qualified for.  Often felons will not apply for jobs because they feel that they will be rejected.  That is not a good practice.  Never eliminate yourself from jobs by not applying.  The more jobs you apply for, the better your opportunity to get interviews.

As far as applying for expungement,  this a legal process that I advise that you don't try without assistance.  I suggest contacting your local legal aid office.  you will find attorneys that can offer low cost and often even no cost assistance with getting this process done in an effective way.

I hope this helps.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Sending resumes and Cover Letters


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon with college education needs a job



Felon with college education needs a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

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Monday, March 18, 2019

REASONS WHY EMPLOYERS SHOULD HIRE EX-CONVICTS

A criminal record shouldn’t always be a dealbreaker when it comes to hiring. 


 REASONS WHY EMPLOYERS SHOULD HIRE EX-CONVICTS
Martha Stewart. Johnny Cash. Mahatma Gandhi. Reese Witherspoon. Susan B. Anthony.

Each of these individuals garnered fame for their talents, be it on screen or in inciting significant social and cultural changes. What do they all have in common other than celebrity status?

They all have an arrest record. 

Just hearing the term “ex-con” makes one think of fearsome beings that serve no use to society other than keeping a prison cell occupied. The thing is, one-third of working adults in the U.S. possess a criminal record, and not all of them fit the stereotype of a grizzled, unhinged, tattooed entity that we see in TV shows and movies. Some individuals had a terrible upbringing and turned their lives around behind bars, while others were in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Since humans are imperfect by nature, hiring managers and business owners ought to consider cutting some slack to those who have repaid their debt to society. All things considered, there are certain crimes that are more forgivable than others (i.e. petty larceny vs. first-degree murder). Depending on the nature of the crime, how long ago it occurred, and the industry an offender is looking to work in, hiring managers and business owners should keep an open mind when a prospective employee reveals a criminal history.

As it turns out, employing a felon has more benefits than you think:

  • An ex-con is less likely to re-offend when employed. By having a schedule and people depending on them to do a job, they’re less inclined to slip back into old habits.

  • Your organization could receive tax benefits for hiring someone with a record. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit is a Federal tax credit available to employers for hiring those who have difficulties gaining employment, such as possessing a criminal record.

  • They have intense vocational training. Many prisons provide job and educational programs that prepare them to reintegrate into society.

  • There is a lower turnover of personnel. They worked very hard to get a job with you in the first place, which means they’re going to work hard to keep it.
  • To an outsider, your company will be considered a beacon of hope to those who are looking to get their lives straightened out. It can take a lot of courage to give someone a second chance, and by doing so, it can humanize your business. 

For those who have never been arrested, it’s easy to turn away someone with a stain on their record. However, just because a bad decision was made does not make an individual any less worthy of having something to offer society.

Recall those arrested individuals I listed above. Martha inspired us to find joy in decorating, crafting, cooking, and baking. Johnny was, and always will be, our Man in Black. Gandhi told us to be the change we wish to see in the world. Reese got us hooked on Big Little Lies and her Draper James dresses. Susan helped get American women the right to vote.

We all make mistakes. We all have something to offer in spite of our pasts. Let’s not be too quick to judge, shall we?

This article first appeared at virginia.ourcommunitynow.com


 Companies that hire felons



Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

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Monday, January 28, 2019

The Next Step in Getting Felons on the Right Path and Into the Workplace

By JIM GERAGHTY, National Review


The Next Step in Getting Felons on the Right Path and Into the Workplace

The next step, announced today at the Koch network’s winter meeting, is a “getting back to work initiative” designed to follow up on the legislation, launched in partnership with the Society for Human Resource Management, the trade association for human resources employees. The initiative will inform businesses on how to recruit, hire, and keep employees who were previously incarcerated.

Charles Koch told the assembled members of the network, “when you hear that one out of four [Americans have a criminal record], this isn’t just some small isolated piece, this involves everybody throughout society.”

SHRM’s CEO Johnny Taylor said his organization had found that as many as 80 percent of employers supported the idea of hiring felons – but a much smaller percentage had actually hired many. They found three main obstacles among employers. The first obstacle was legal compliance issues, including most federal agencies and contractors that deal with security issues or require a federal security clearance. The second was the perception of civil liability on the part of employers, and a fear that hiring a felon could lead to a lawsuit if the felon committed a crime on the job. The third, Taylor said, was a psychological NIBMY (Not In My Backyard) mentality – that plenty of employers and employees liked the idea of hiring felons, but not at their own workplaces. He’s hoping the “employer toolkit” offered by SHRM and the Koch network will mitigate those forces.

Taylor admitted the liability issue was one of the most challenging, as the potential legal risk to employers varied from state to state. He noted that studies indicate that felons who had been released from prison were no more likely to commit crimes in the workplace than employees with no criminal records.



“Regardless of the employee, you do your diligence,” said Mark Holden, the general counsel for Koch Industries. “We’ve been hiring people with criminal records for as long as I’ve been here, about quarter of a century, and we’ve never had that issue. When you hire someone, either way, you’re taking a chance on them. We’ve hired people from the best schools, from the best background, and we’ve later found they’ve stolen from us.”

Taylor said that depending upon the measuring stick, there are anywhere from 6.6 million to 7 million unfilled jobs in the United States right now, and each year, roughly 650,000 people leave prison and reenter society.

“The First Step Act’s prison reform elements include education and skill training,” Holden said. “More people are going to be coming out for prison skilled and ready to go, ready to get back in the game. When employers choose to put applications of convicted felons in the wastepaper basket, it’s a huge wasted opportunity. A lot of these people are very hungry and very humble.”

Chris Wright, the chief executive officer of Liberty Oilfield Services, said that in his experience, released felons “have a passion to prove themselves. Really, you’re hiring the heart. If they’re going to work hard when no one is looking, and if they’re someone who will do the right thing, even under stress, you’re going to win.”

Holden noted that the while the Koch network pushed for the First Step Act and is eager to see America’s businesses start hiring the recently released, they oppose government mandates requiring employers to hire felons, and want to see employers freely embrace the option.




companies that hire felons




Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record




Eric Mayo

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Thursday, January 17, 2019

Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice

Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice

 
Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice
I recently was hired at a nursing home and was railed through all the pre employment paper work everyone goes threw these days. I had a drug test, back ground check and had to submit my fingerprints. Well I got a call that something was found in my back ground that has to be looked into further. All they information I was given was that the incident occurred in 2003 making me 16 and I of course knew right away what it was. I was charged with a misdemeanor and did 1 year probation. I like many other people had it seal away because I was a juvenile. Can they not hire me because of this? This is the only thing I have ever done in my entire life. I have never been arrested nor even gotten pulled over. My adult record is clean.


Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice


Hello,

I'm not sure where you live but most states seal juvenile records from the public. In most cases they are only visible to law enforcement, the court system and government agencies. The one instance that it would not be sealed is the case of a sexual offense. If that is not your situation, you should seek legal advice as to why your offense is visible.

Many ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs often need legal advice. I suggest your local legal aid office.

I hope this helps.


How to get your Juvenile Record Expunged



How can a juvenile record affect my child's life?



Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice

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Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Ex-offender may need help to get a job.

Ex-offender may need help to get a job


 Ex-offender may need help to get a job
Hello,

I came across your blog while looking for work. First, I would like to say how much appreciate your time and efforts in providing helpful information for ex-offenders. I have read through most of the posts and your advice has given me some hope in finding work.

I was convicted of a misdemeanor charge of burglary. This occurred over 10 years ago. I didn't serve any jail time and was given 3 years of probation. Since then I went back to school, received a bachelor's degree,started my own business, and plan to go back to pursue a Master's degree.

I want to work in a youth care facility, specifically working with at-risk youth and provide counseling, mentoring, and outreach. However, if a facility is licensed by the state, live-scan is a requirement. I had the misdemeanor charge expunged, but I know that the charge will still be on record (which I had expunged). I actually had an interview for a facility and when asked about my criminal background, I was honest with that person. However, she could not hire me because of the record. She told me that I could apply for an exemption to work in the facility.

My question/concern is that from research on receiving an exemption, I would have to have the particular facility send a letter/request to the Licensing board before I can fill out the appropriate paperwork to get this exemption. Is it common for any facility to honor this request? How I interpret this is that this facility would have to support you and go out of their way so they can hire you. My frustration is that any place is going to hire someone else that has a clean background over someone like myself. So I am wondering if you have had

any experience with exemptions or clearances through the DOJ/LIvescan? Do you think it is possible for ex-offenders to get jobs in this field? I will jump through hoops and get what is needed to get hired but is it a lost cause and doing all of this for nothing?

I am sorry for the lengthy email. I've spent many months researching this subject. I really could not find much information in regards to other people's experience with this particular subject. It has been very discouraging. I would appreciate any insight you might have. Thank you for your time.


Sincerely,

G


Ex-offender may need help to get a job



Hello G,

 Ex-offender may need help to get a jobI guess it couldn't hurt to apply for the exemption and the facility definitely would have to put some added effort into it. I want everyone to understand that expungement and sealing of records does not erase them. They simply are hidden from the public. The charge and subsequent conviction will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies.

I know of ex-offenders and felons having similar jobs. The fact that you were informed about applying for exemption should give you hope if you really want this jobs. As I tell all ex-offenders and felons, they should apply for all jobs they believe they qualify for.

If this doesn't work out, you can always contact the United Way office in your area. They will be able to put you in contact with advocates and other organizations that provide services for ex-offenders and felons.

I hope this helps.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Truth About Background Checks

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
Ex-offender may need help to get a job.


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record



  Ex-offender may need help to get a job.

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Monday, January 7, 2019

New 'clean slate' law gives some ex-offenders fresh hope on jobs, housing


New 'clean slate' law gives some ex-offenders fresh hope on jobs, housing
Pennsylvanians with old, low-level offenses on their records have fresh hope that past mistakes won’t cost them new jobs or housing.

As of Dec. 26, the state’s new Clean Slate Law allows people to petition to seal legal records in many misdemeanor cases that are more than 10 years old.

“Non-violent first-degree misdemeanors and most simple assault convictions became eligible for sealing, if the individual has not been convicted for 10 years and if no fines and costs are owed,” Sharon Dietrich, legislation director for Community Legal Services, explained in a press release.

A second phase of the law will kick in on June 28, when courts will begin automatically sealing records in eligible cases.

Here are answers to some key questions about the new law and how it works.

How is a criminal record sealed?

An ex-offender starts by completing a Petition for Order for Limited Access, a one-page form at the Self-Help Center at the county courthouse and online at www.pacourts.us/forms.

It asks for such information as the charges and the judge who imposed sentence.

If the offense happened in Lancaster County, the completed petition should be taken to the Clerk of Courts at the Lancaster County courthouse. There’s a $137 fee, but the indigent may seek a waiver.

Clerk of Courts Jacquelyn Pfursich said her office sends the petition to the judge who imposed sentencing and to the District Attorney’s Office. The district attorney has 30 days to challenge the petition, leading to a hearing before the judge. But if the district attorney doesn’t object, no hearing is needed.

District Attorney Craig Stedman said he expects that filing an objection would be rare, happening, perhaps, if facts on a petition were misrepresented.

Stedman called Clean Slate an overdue, crime-prevention measure because it promotes employment.

“If someone can have a job, they are tying themselves to the community,” he said. “That's a great indicator that the person is less likely to commit crime.”

For those who need it, free legal help is available through “My Clean Slate,” a program created by Community Legal Services in partnership with the Pennsylvania Bar Association. Volunteer attorneys will help to determine if someone is eligible for the provisions of the Clean Slate legislation, which went into effect on Dec. 26.

The program’s website is at https://clsphila.org/mycleanslatepa

What happens after the judge grants the petition?
The Clerk of Courts Office marks its record of the conviction: “Sealed. Not open for public inspection.”

The office also notifies the police department, the magisterial district judge, Lancaster County Prison and other agencies that they are prohibited from sharing the records.

How does automatic sealing work?

The new law creates an automated process to seal any arrest that didn’t result in a conviction, summary convictions after 10 years, and some misdemeanor convictions for those who've been law-abiding for 10 years.

For those cases, no petition needs to be filed starting June 28.

Instead, the Administrative Office of Pennsylvania Courts will pull eligible records from its database of all criminal records and submit them to the Pennsylvania State Police to check for possible conflicts. The ex-offender will get a letter saying the old record will no longer show up on background checks.

The state will remove eligible docket sheets from its online listing of criminal cases, but not the listing of fines and costs.

The state office will also notify the Clerk of Courts which of its records must be sealed.

Pfursich said she doesn’t know how many local cases could end up sealed. In 2018, a record 7,522 criminal cases were filed locally.

Are people taking advantage of the new law already?

About 700 people statewide petitioned to have their records sealed in the first week after the law took effect, Gov. Tom Wolf said at a news conference Wednesday.

But it's too early to predict the law's impact here, officials said.

In Lancaster County, there wasn’t immediately a noticeable increase in the number of petitions for offenses that fit within the margins of the Clean Slate Law, according to Steve Gumm, the executive director of the Lancaster Bar Association.

But the bar association is “very happy with the law's passage” and sees it as the right step for those whose old, non-violent offenses have created barriers for their lives.

Attorney Mark F. Walmer, who routinely handles cases for sealing, expunging or pardoning past offenses, said he believes the big change will be the phase of automated sealing, when petitions will no longer be needed for eligible offenses.

“The sealing statute will be good for people who have one or two very old misdemeanor offenses," he said.

Walmer noted that the responsibility for verifying that a record has been automatically sealed will fall on individuals. Under the law, only “non-controversial” offenses are automatically sealed; other cases — those that include multiple charges or have unpaid fees, for example — make it through the automated system.

“There are many different disqualifications," Walmer said. “Know exactly what is on your record, have it reviewed by an attorney.”

How big a difference will it make?

Tara Loew leads Lancaster CareerLink’s Re-Entry Services, which works with job-seekers who have criminal backgrounds.

That program serves about 600 people a year, she said, and overall, about a quarter of the people Lancaster CareerLink works with report some kind of criminal record.

Many employers ask about misdemeanor convictions, she said, and retail theft charges can be “extremely limiting” for job-seekers, “more so than felony charges in some cases.”

Loew expects the new law to have a big impact on job-seekers.

In addition to giving individuals that deserve it a second chance, she said, the law breaks down barriers to finding full-time life-sustaining employment — helping families thrive and contributing to the local economy and community safety, as someone gainfully employed is much less likely to reoffend.

She said it also helps employers who might be inclined to give applicants a second chance by taking liability away from them, because legally they’re hiring someone with a “clean slate.”

Loew also said CareerLink has recently held two free criminal record legal clinics for job-seekers, with MidPenn Legal Services, Lancaster Bar Association, Rep. Mike Sturla and the law firm Bentley, Gibson, Kopecki Smith P.C.

Attendees got a chance to have an attorney look over their records and see what their options might be, she said, and when possible were offered free continuing legal help.

The clinics were a hit, Loew said, and CareerLink now plans to offer them quarterly, capped at 30 attendees.

Can an employer ask about sealed records?

Attorney Jennifer Craighead Carey, chair of the Barley Snyder Employment Practice Group, said in an email that Clean Slate prohibits employers from requesting criminal history records that have been sealed and they may not rely on such information in making an employment decision.

The law also allows applicants questioned about sealed records to answer as if the offense did not occur, she wrote, recommending that employers use disclaimer stating that applicants “should not provide information about expunged or sealed criminal convictions.”

How do employers feel about Clean Slate?

Tom Baldrige, president and CEO of the Lancaster Chamber, said it hasn’t heard much from employers about the new law, but he believes they’re generally supportive of it.

“No one is looking for additional barriers to hiring people,” he said, noting that the current workforce need is the most acute he’s seen in 19 years with the chamber. “There are companies that are literally turning down business opportunities because they don’t have the workers, and that is relatively widespread.”

He doesn’t consider the law a game-changer for employers, he said, but does think it “gives some people who might have been hesitant to fully enter the workforce because of some past indiscretions the confidence to come back, and that’s a win-win.”

Harold G. Ford III of NetAtWork is president of Lancaster Society for Human Resource Management.

He noted that Clean Slate passed the Legislature with overwhelming bipartisan support and said, “I think that says really clearly this is really good for potential applicants but also for employers.”

Does it increase housing accessibility?

Ninety percent of the landlords that Tabor Community Services works with through its Community Housing Solutions program — an initiative of the Lancaster County Coalition to End Homelessness — have background checks as part of their screening process, according to organization president Michael F. McKenna and program manager Laura Willmer.

Although not the only criteria landlords are applying when screening tenants, past criminal offenses can create an additional barrier to affordable housing, McKenna said.

Tabor does not track the criminal records of those within their programs, but a significant number of those who have disclosed their background would fall under the Clean Slate law's parameters, Willmer and McKenna said.

“Some landlords will do a full background check and look for absolutely everything and others do not do one at all,” said Ann Linkey division manager at Tabor.

Usually, the criminal screenings are to find “violent and drug-related" offenses, Linkey said. The types of offenses that landlords and property managers find disqualifying vary.

“Some will look at a DUI and let it go if it was just that, others would say no,” she said.

Although her team does not track how many housing applications were rejected due to criminal background checks and what those offenses were, it does happen, Linkey said.

“It's a good thing for our clients who have those kinds of backgrounds," Linkey said of Clean Slate.

“It will complement the federal Fair Housing Act," Ray D'Agostino, chief executive officer at the Lancaster Housing Opportunity Partnership, said of the new law. In most cases, real estate decisions based solely on criminal records are already prohibited, he said.

This article originally published at https://lancasteronline.com  https://lancasteronline.com/news/local/new-clean-slate-law-gives-some-ex-offenders-fresh-hope/article_b70bdbf6-105b-11e9-9d7a-938b4041b090.html


New 'clean slate' law gives some ex-offenders fresh hope on jobs, housing


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Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Expungement for Felons | Sealing of Records | Housing for Felons
Eric Mayo

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Saturday, December 22, 2018

Five Bottom Line Reasons Why Employers Should Hire Ex-Felons


Mike Green, Contributor
Co-founder, ScaleUp Partners LLC

Five Bottom Line Reasons Why Employers Should Hire Ex-FelonsThere is no city in the nation that’s growing faster than the population of 70 million Americans with criminal records. As one of them, former real estate developer R.L. Pelshaw is determined to turn this costly societal burden into an opportunity. “With criminal records it’s difficult for many ex-offenders to get jobs making a livable wage,” Pelshaw said. “Showing (ex) criminals how to be successful in legal businesses is far better then returning to crime, and will change the destiny of millions of people.” For employers, there exists a real opportunity to disrupt the continuous cycle of quarantining humans. And for the sake of society at large, sustainable employment may not only represent our best opportunity to significantly disrupt recidivism and the growing population of Americans with criminal records, it may be our only option. Consider the costs. Between 1973 and 2009, the nation’s prison population grew by 705 percent. Over the past two decades costs of incarceration have skyrocketed more than 305 percent, according to a 2011 Pew study. States now spend more than $52B out of their budgets (second only to Medicaid), for incarceration. And the economic impact inherent in the process of policing and locking up those who perpetrate crimes in our communities is compounded by the economic impact of high recidivism rates of 84 percent for males, age 24 years and younger. This revolving door is fueled by a pipeline that has grown exponentially over the past several decades to the point where the United States incarcerates more of its population than any nation in the world. America’s employers must take note of what happens to released inmates when they re-enter society, often after years of being quarantined, and with little hope of finding employment that funds a new path to productive citizenship. In 2012, more than 630,000 inmates were released into targeted communities across America. According to the latest study by the Bureau of Justice, three of every four released prisoners were re-arrested within the five-year life of the study. An extraordinarily high percentage (89 percent) of ex-felons re-arrested were unemployed. Pelshaw is determined to change that. He launched and self-funded a campaign called, The National Hire Ex-Felons Campaign, designed to inform employers of the benefits of tapping into this 70-million-strong workforce. Of course, there are plenty of unemployed people who do not commit crimes. The suggestion is not that employment alone is a panacea for this national problem. But, there is no other immediate option to developing sustainable financial stability for ex-felons. The longer that former inmates remain unemployed following release, the greater the risk they will seek income through alternative means. Their fate impacts the fate of families, communities and ultimately society at large. Employment is one of the tools we have to address this growing problem. Those who pay their debt to society and emerge from prison with a new perspective and lease on life deserve an opportunity to earn a living. They represent a class of prospective employees unlike any other. But, why should employers assume the risk of hiring ex-felons? You may be surprised by these five fact-based, bottom line reasons. Hiring Incentives: Finding good help is a key factor in running a successful business. Too many employers get robbed daily by lazy employees who work with a sense of entitlement, watching the clock, anticipating that moment they can break free of the bonds that trap them in cubicles, offices and warehouses. Many daydream of weekend getaways and play-cations while robotically moving through tasks, diluting the level of worker productivity. Ex-felons are no stranger to hard work. And they are grateful for the opportunity to earn a living. Most believe they have something to prove to their families and employers. But there are additional bottom line incentives to employees who hire former inmates. Substantial tax credits are available for hiring ex-felons, such as the Federal Work Opportunity Tax Credit. Some states even provide partial wage reimbursement, additional tax credits, and other training funds for employers who hire ex-felons.
“We’ve had three (subsidies) that amount to several hundreds of thousands of dollars to bear down on training our employees,” said Mike Hannigan, CEO of Give Something Back. “It’s amazing to me how many resources are available to a company.” Employers who hire felons can also be eligible to obtain a free fidelity bond funded by the federal government to protect them against employee dishonesty or theft. More importantly, credible studies clearly indicate that ex-felons out of prison seven years or more have no higher rate of committing a crime than non-felons. A 2009 University of Maryland study found that people with a criminal record are at no greater criminal risk after they’ve been out seven to 10 years than those with no record. Employee Reliability: Few things hurt a business more than high turnover rates. Employers who spend too much time with a focus on hiring employees who won’t leave shortly thereafter find themselves neglecting other areas of the business that require attention. Ex-felons have far fewer options than conventional employees. Due to the scarcity of opportunities for ex-felons, many employers that hire them have lower turnover than with conventional hires. According to the Partnership for Safety and Justice, many ex-felons have a favorable employment and educational history. “In general, formerly incarcerated people are as reliable as other workers,” the report states, citing numerous studies. Hiring Opportunity: The landscape of employable ex-felons is large. Ex-offenders on probation often have to maintain employment as a condition of release. Most parolees are drug-tested by their probation officer or halfway house at no expense to employers. Most parole officers and halfway houses welcome contact with employers of supervised felons. That supervision de-risks the employment opportunity and is an added value at no cost to the employer. An estimated 6.9 million persons were under supervision of adult correctional systems in 2013, according to the Bureau of Justice. This is a significant, largely untapped and motivated work force. A 2008 study by the Urban Institute Justice Policy Center found that fewer than 45 percent of felons were employed eight months after being released. In real numbers that means more than 3.5 million prospective workers are available for hire. Economic Impact: Employers can make a considerable difference in transforming a criminal liability into a community asset. Unemployed ex-felons are at a greater risk of re-offending compared to employed ex-felons. Many ex-felons turn to crime and return to jail (recidivism) because they can’t find a job paying a livable wage.
“People who break the law need to be held accountable and pay their debt to society,” said Adam Gelb, director of the Pew Center on the States’ Public Safety Performance Project. “At the same time, the collateral costs of locking up 2.3 million people are piling higher and higher.” According to VERA institute of Justice, the U.S. spends nearly40 billion a year to house inmates. The average cost per state to house one inmate is31,286 per year. But if that one felon gets a job instead of returning to prison, he or she now contributes to the economy by more than $10,000 a year, according to a Baylor University study. Crime Market Disruption: An estimated 70 million U.S. adults have arrest or conviction records based on Bureau of Justice statistics. Tougher sentencing laws, especially for drug offenses, have swelled that total. Society can’t afford to simply banish 70 million people from the workplace. Children of incarcerated adults are the highest at-risk group in America. Many follow in their parents’ footsteps, continuing the cycle of crime and fueling a criminal market pipeline. Children of felons are seven times more likely to be incarcerated themselves. They are more likely (23 percent vs 4 percent) to be expelled or suspended from school than other children.
And the criminal market isn’t just isolated to minority populations. Across the nation, 40 percent of young men (regardless of race) will have a police-record encounter before the age of 23. Of those incarcerated, 84 percent will return to prison. It’s a continuous criminal market cycle that costs taxpayers more than $52 billion a year and threatens the stability of families and communities, in particular those already suffering from economic distress. Employing an ex-felon can disrupt the cycle of this criminal market and provides an opportunity to restore stability to families through a solid financial footing. “To fight the vicious circle of crime and recidivism we need to create ways offenders, ex-offenders, those at risk to offend, and those living off crime (but not yet caught) can make money legitimately,” said Pelshaw, who is also the author of Illegal to Legal: Business Success for (ex) Criminals. With more than 630,000 inmates released into neighborhoods across America every year, the community of ex-felons released each year is larger than the population of many major cities. Employers are already discovering the challenges of finding good employees without criminal records. Perhaps it’s time employers considered the benefits of hiring good employees who happen to be ex-felons. Originally seen at Huffingtonpost.com: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/mike-green/five-bottom-line-reasons-_b_8021476.html



Five Bottom Line Reasons Why Employers Should Hire Ex-Felons

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Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Eric Mayo


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