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Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Americans with criminal records could be a solution to the labor shortage



Originally published by Yahoo FinanceAnchor

Jeff Arview had been kicking around in different jobs. An Army veteran who served in Iraq, after he was discharged he suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder and fell into addiction, which led to fighting and theft — then arrests and jail time. Moving on and getting a job was a challenge.

“Even though I was a veteran, because of that criminal history, I was unable to gain employment, which made it really tough,” Arview said. At times, he fell into homelessness.

Arview, 39, is far from alone. The unemployment rate among formerly incarcerated people was 27%, according to a 2018 analysis by the Prison Policy Initiative. That compares with the current overall U.S. unemployment rate of 4.8% in September. A criminal background has carried a stigma for some employers, and in some states there are steep legal hurdles to clearing one's record.

When looking for jobs, Arview came across a recruitment video from staffing company Kelly Services targeting veterans. Enough time had passed since his last arrest that he wasn’t legally required to disclose it when applying — although he eventually did. He was hired as a contractor, then as a full-time talent adviser two and a half years ago.

Second-chance initiatives 'tap into talent' amid a labor crunch

Last month, Kelly Services introduced a recruiting program specifically designed for people with non-violent criminal records. It’s one of an increasing number of companies trying to de-stigmatize so-called “second chance” workers with dual-pronged philanthropic and self-interested goals — help people get back on their feet, and find workers in a tight job market.

Kelly Services CEO Peter Quigley said the latter is a challenge right now.

“The fact is that there are a lot of open jobs, but there are not a lot of jobs open that people want,” he told Yahoo Finance Live in an interview. He said employers have to address employees’ shifting priorities, including offering them paths to career advancement and an inclusive and diverse workplace.

Kelly Services’s program targeting criminal offenders, called Kelly 33, kicked off after an initial partnership with Toyota, where 645 workers accepted jobs at the automaker’s Georgetown, Kentucky plant.

“Toyota took a second-chance initiative and was able to increase its talent pool by 20%, increase its diversity by almost 10%, and improve its retention by 70%. These second-chance workers are thankful, they’re reliable and they’re loyal,” Quigley said.

Kelly Services and Toyota aren’t alone. A group of companies in April started the Second Chance Business Coalition, led by co-chairs Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO of JPMorgan Chase, and Craig Arnold, chairman and CEO of Eaton.

JPMorgan hired 2,100 people with criminal backgrounds in 2020, about 10% of new hires. That was thanks in part to partnerships with community groups in Chicago and Columbus, who trained potential employees and educated them on banking regulations.

“This is making sure we tap into talent that maybe wouldn’t come our way,” said Michelle Kuranty, executive director — global head of talent acquisition sourcing at JPMorgan. “Good talent is always a challenge.”

JPMorgan and the coalition are also pushing for policy changes, including “banning the box” — not including a box on job applications for candidates to check if they have a criminal record — and “clean slate” policies to clear or seal criminal records.

Employers are 'a little more open minded' about criminal records

Americans who have been incarcerated or have a conviction on their record are “ready to work and deserve a second chance — an opportunity to fill the millions of job openings across the country,” wrote Dimon in an August op-ed. “Yet our criminal justice system continues to block them from doing so.”

Economists estimate that U.S. employers hired 500,000 workers in September, up from 235,000 in August. That contrasts with the nearly 11 million jobs that were open in July. Recent jobs data has been lagging forecasts, for reasons ranging from difficult-to-secure child care to geography and skills mismatches.

“When you’re in the legal system, there’s a lot of pressure, it’s not just financial pressure. It’s hard to find somebody that offers you any kind of hope,” said David Shaffer, who was arrested for his third DWI in 2009, a felony in Texas. “Once you get in trouble, the world is full of people telling you what you can’t do.”

By the following year, he was searching for jobs, and got a call from Kelly Services, to whom he disclosed his criminal issues. Eleven years later, he’s still working there, as a senior operations manager.

His colleague, Jeff Arview, said work culture is continuing to change. “Employers are being a little more open minded to it, given the workforce that is needed right now, and I think that is awesome, because they’ll actually give people a chance.”

Correction: JPMorgan partnered with community groups in Columbus. The city was misstated in an earlier version of this article.

This post has been updated with the September jobs numbers.

Julie Hyman is the co-anchor of Yahoo Finance Live, weekdays 9am-11am ET. Follow her on Twitter @juleshyman, and read her other stories.



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Saturday, November 27, 2021

Felons Should Try Smaller Companies to get Jobs

Felons Should Try Smaller Companies to get Jobs

 


Felons Should Try Smaller Companies to get Jobs

From ex-felons to furniture makers

Hello,

I have a criminal record and I can't find a job. I have been filling out applications everywhere. Do you have any advice for someone who has made some mistakes?

I hear this from felons all the time. Please don’t quit. You get nothing when you give up. You may just have to change your strategy. If I am an employer, I probably want to hire someone without a record before I hire someone without one. Most applications will ask about criminal convictions. If you are honest, as I recommend, an employer may not want to hire you.


Felons Should Try Smaller Companies to get JobsA good strategy for finding job openings is to apply to employers directly. Once you have decided on the type of work you would like to do, the next step is to choose employers that could use your services. Felons stand a better chance of being hired by smaller companies rather than larger ones. The owners or managers of smaller companies usually make the hiring decisions. Make a list of employers in your chosen field. Contact each one of them to see if there are positions available and how to apply. The telephone is the best method of contacting employers. You may even get job leads from people you know. Another advantage to applying to small companies is they are less likely to run background checks because they can be expensive.

If you get an interview, make a point to mention the Work Opportunity Tax Credit. To a small business, this may be an incentive to hire a person with a criminal record. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit is offered to employers as an incentive to hire any one of nine targeted groups with barriers to employment, felons included. An employer may receive a credit of as much as $2,400 for hiring a felon. You can find more information here:


Felons Should Try Smaller Companies to get Jobshttp://www.doleta.gov/business/incentives/opptax/

Also remind any prospective employer that you can be bonded by the Federal Bonding Program.  The ability to be bonded will be a big plus.  A felon can be bonded free of charge.  You can get more information on the federal bonding program here:


Federal Bonding Program






Companies that hire Felons


 


Felons Should Try Smaller Companies to get Jobs


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

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Friday, November 26, 2021

Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?

Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?


Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?
Hello sir,

I have a question. I am currently in the process of applying to work for the New York City Board of Education but I am worried that I may not get the job because I have a juvenile conviction. I was arrested on grounds for felony for reckless endangerment but I took a plea bargain and opted out for a misdemeanor instead. I was arrested back 91/2 years ago.

I have to get my fingerprints taken and have a background check done on me so I am nervous that my conviction will pop up. And I have a sealed record but I am wondering will that also affect anything in my applying to work for the New York City board of Education.



I get a lot of questions like this from juvenile ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs.

Let me understand. You are afraid that a 9 1/2 yr. old juvenile misdemeanor conviction will stop the New York City Board of Education from hiring you.


Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?It is my understanding that juvenile records are sealed and can only be seen by the court system, law enforcement and government agencies. Even if it were public, I doubt anyone would hold a 9 1/2 yr. old juvenile misdemeanor charge against you.

Here in NJ where I am, job applicants are not even bound to include juvenile convictions. I'm not sure about NY state. To be absolutely sure, I would contact someone in your local legal aid office for clarification.

I hope this helps.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights






Companies that hire felons


Will a juvenile record keep me out of a job?


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Juvenile Record

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Thursday, November 18, 2021

Felon wants a Military Career

Felon wants a Military Career

Felon wants a Military Career

Can I Join the Army with a Felony?

Hello I hope you can help......

Well I was charged with failure to stop after having an accident involving personal injury and I'm a little misunderstanding of what it means for it being a class four felony. I want to get into the military cuz lets face it at this point in time the chances of me getting a decent job to support me and family is really really low with this charge on me.

 I don't see any other options cuz from what I have been gathering with web browsing you can't get certain certificates and degrees to work and money is not real good at the moment to just lolly gag so my questions are as follows

1. Can I get it expunged?

2. Is it a felony misdemeanor

3. How would I go about tryin to get in the military with this?

4. What states would this not count as a felony....... and I'm sorry if its a lot or jus very scrambled. I want the best for my child and wife so I'm a little everywhere with this but I'm looking forward to this response thank you.


Ernesto


  Felon wants a Military Career



Hello Ernesto,

Questions 1, 2 and 4 are best answered by an attorney. Often ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs need legal assistance. I suggest contacting your local legal aid office. There you will probably be able to get low-cost or low-cost legal advice. They may be also be able to answer questions about ex-offenders and felons getting professional certifications. 

Felon wants a Military Career
Just a note on expungement, it is not an option in every state.  Even in states which allow them, often they are limited.  For example, in New Jersey, where I am, one is allowed only one felony expungement.  It cannot even be applied for until ten years after the termination of the sentence.  Expungement is not a cure all.  Even if one is granted, the conviction will always be visible to the court system, government agencies and law enforcement.

Felon wants a Military Career
Don't give up on a military career. The military often accepts ex-offenders and felons and there are many career options. Your best option is the Army. The Army seems to be the most liberal as it relates to accepting ex-offenders and felons. Contact you local Army recruiter to inquire about your eligibility.

I hope this helps.



Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights


Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
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Felon wants a Military Career



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Criminal history questions on job applications could soon become illegal

Criminal history questions on job applications could soon become illegal

Posted: Sep 18, 2017 3:50 PM EDTUpdated: Sep 18, 2017 10:19 PM EDT
If the employer plans on denying an applicant based on their conviction history, the bill would require the employer to do an individualized review of whether or not their history would have a direct and adverse relationship with the specific duties of the job.
They would have to consider three stipulations: the nature of the offense, the time that has passed between the offense and sentence completion, and the nature of the job.
The employer would have to notify the person applying with a written decision, and the applicant is allowed five business days to respond, and an additional five days to dispute the decision with evidence.
There are some companies that require background checks by law, so they would be exempt from this bill if it becomes a law, according to Eppright.
Nine states and 15 cities, including San Francisco and Los Angeles, have adopted similar regulations.



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Eric Mayo

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