Eric Mayo Jobs for Felons: How felons can get jobs
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Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Felon wants to become a teacher

Felon wants to become a teacher

Hello there,

Thank you very much for this resource. I am a 26 year old woman looking to get a teaching certificate. I would like to teach elementary, Jr. High, or High School. I was given a deferred sentence in 2013 for Felony Menacing. Again, the charge was deferred and I successfully completed my probationary term. As I understand it, there was no plea of guilty and I was not charged. I was told that law enforcement and other government agencies will have access to view the record of the arrests. Does this disqualify me from working with children and becoming a teacher? I still have to get my teaching certificate and would really, really like to do so. I just need to get the appropriate information to ensure that this is possible and that I will not run into any trouble with this situation.

If you can provide me with links and resources I would greatly appreciate it.

Thank you for your time and service,

Randi


 Felon wants to become a teacher





Hello Randi,

Generally speaking, in cases like these, upon completion of your probation, the charges are formally dropped. You will have an arrest record but no conviction record. I can't see that being held against you. I don't see any reason you cannot become a teacher. To be absolutely certain, you can contact the prosecutor who was associated with your case to make sure the charges were actually dropped.

For anyone else who is considering teaching but have criminal records, don't assume you cannot get a teaching certificate.  If your conviction is not directly related to the job you are looking for you may still be able to be certified.  My suggestion is to contact the board of education where you would like to teach.  There should be someone who could direct you to the state certification board to determine you eligibility.



I hope this helps.


Felon

Felon wants to become a teacher


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Felon wants to become a teacher

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Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Why JPMorgan Chase Wants to Give More Former Criminals a Second Chance

Why JPMorgan Chase Wants to Give More Former Criminals a Second Chance
Why JPMorgan Chase Wants to Give More Former Criminals a Second Chance
Originally published on Fortune.com By Matthew Heimer October 21, 2019
In 2018, financial giant JPMorgan Chase hired more than 20,000 people in the U.S. Roughly 10% of them—about 2,100—had a criminal history. And if CEO Jamie Dimon’s plans are realized, those employees will eventually be joined by many more co-workers with similar blotches on their records. 
JPMorgan today is announcing several major steps to encourage second-chance hiring for those with criminal records. The bank is officially "banning the box"—removing all questions about criminal records from its job applications. It will steer more than $7 million toward organizations that provide job- and life-skills training to the formerly incarcerated. The bank is also launching a new “policy center,” a think tank of sorts that will design and advocate for regulatory changes around certain economic issues. Its first agenda item: reforming rules that effectively bar former felons from employment, in finance and elsewhere.
In an interview with Fortune, Dimon described the new campaign as an offshoot of the bank’s widening economic-revitalization campaign, an effort that has involved steering financing, training and expertise to cash-starved neighborhoods, particularly in Detroit and Chicago. Those campaigns, he said, had exposed more of the bank’s leaders to the challenges faced by “returning citizens” with felonies on their records. “They can’t get jobs, they can’t rent a home,” Dimon said. “Socially, they’re on the margins.”
The bank’s moves come at a time of growing bipartisan support for criminal-justice reforms that could help better integrate former offenders in the economy. Those include reductions of penalties for some minor misdemeanors, as well as measures that could help people more easily expunge their criminal records. There are about 70 million working-age adults in the U.S. with either an arrest record or a criminal conviction, according to a report by the Brennan Center for Justice. Research suggests people with such blemishes are much less likely to make it past a first job interview. And a 2018 study put the unemployment rate among formerly incarcerated people at 27%, many times higher than the wider jobless rate.
JPMorgan stresses that its focus is on building opportunities in entry level jobs for people whose past offenses were relatively minor—think DUIs, disorderly conduct, or low-level drug possession. (Hiring hardened criminals or fraudsters to work in sensitive financial positions remains well out of bonds.) The bank’s early pilot programs in building an employment pipeline for candidates that qualify will be focused in Chicago, where JPMorgan launched a $40 million neighborhood revitalization campaign in 2017. 

A new policy arm

Heather Higginbottom, a former State Department official during the Obama administration, will begin tackling issues related to returning citizens in her new role as head of the JPMorgan Chase PolicyCenter. At the top of the agenda, she told Fortune, is working with the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. to ease rules that make it hard for financial institutions to make second-chance hires. Other priorities, she said, include campaigning at the state and local level for broader ban-the-box rules; making criminal-record expungement automatic for low-level convictions; and changing rules that enable courts to suspend the drivers’ licenses of minor offenders—a punishment that often hamstrings someone’s ability to get or hold down a job.  
The PolicyCenter will eventually take on a range of other issues related to economic inclusion. Dimon said he envisions the center “digging into everything that creates income volatility—tax payments, healthcare, having to get your car fixed.” Higginbottom added, “The criteria is: Do we have unique expertise and experience? We’re looking at things like retirement savings, affordable housing, areas where we bring a lot of data to bear.” 
What made second-chance hiring the first priority? Dimon said one catalyst for the decision was Bryan Stevenson, the law professor, defense attorney, and executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative. Stevenson spoke to top JPMorgan Chase executives in 2018 about criminal-justice reform and racial inequities. People in the audience “were absolutely speechless and teary-eyed,” Dimon recalled. “The injustices of the system—that motivates people.” 

Why JPMorgan Chase Wants to Give More Former Criminals a Second Chance


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Why JPMorgan Chase Wants to Give More Former Criminals a Second Chance

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Thursday, October 17, 2019

Goodwill industries providing hope and help to convicted felons


Posted: Mon 11:31 PM, Oct 14, 2019  | Updated: Mon 11:40 PM, Oct 14, 2019

Toledo, OHIO (WTVG) - Goodwill Industries works to convicted felons get back into the workforce. The non-profit recently received a $1 million grant from the Department of Justice for a program aimed at providing training and treatment behind bars.
The program is called Stay the Course. 
The idea is to have case workers and other navigators inside county and regional jails and state prisons,
Goodwill industries providing hope and help to convicted felons
connecting with convicted felons and offering them help before release.
Senator Rob Portman helped secure funding through the Second Chance Act. Since 2009 the legislation has helped fund $39 million in grant money for Ohio re-entry programs.
Amanda Huckleberry was convicted of felony theft three years ago, since then she has been working to find permanent housing, a job and transportation with the help of Goodwill.
She attributes her success of staying away from the streets to her caseworker, Samantha. Huckleberry says when she was released, after serving 7 months in prison, she had no job, no house and no car.
"I went from having everything to nothing," says Huckleberry.
Today, Senator Rob Portman heard some of the success stories linked to the local program and also address areas where there are gaps.
For Huckleberry, while she is receiving job training, housing and transportation continue to be an issue. Portman says he wants to introduce the Jobs Act again to Congress as another way to guarantee employment after incarceration, potentially making securing a home and a vehicle easier for those with nothing.
Portman says he wants federal Pell Grants to not only cover the cost of colleges and universities but skilled trade training jobs and certification programs. He believes this will help those convicted of a crime get back into the workforce quickly and be able to earn a living wage for positions that are in dire need of qualified workers.

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Monday, September 30, 2019

Expungement could help felons get Jobs

 Expungement could help felons get Jobs

Expungement could help felons get Jobs


Hello Sir:

I was convicted of felony in 2009 for possession and delivery of narcotics, I served 26 months and everything has been well for me until 2019. I have been having a hard time getting a job in my field of study, which is computer science. I am enclosing my resume so that you can take a look at all of the places I have worked, but can't seem to find work because of the intense background checks now. ONE Conviction 21 Years ago man it's hard. 

Please Advise. 

Thank you.



 Expungement could help felons get Jobs




Hello Jason,

Looking at your background, your inability to find work may be due to other factors. Some convictions are more difficult to work with than others.  Take a look at the first video below.  It will give you an idea of what I mean.  

For many ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, expungement may help. Expungement will not erase your conviction but it may keep it off of the average background check. You can find more information here:

http://courts.michigan.gov/scao/selfhelp/intro/criminal/setaside_help.htm


I would not attempt this alone. You may be able to get low-cost or even low-cost assistance at your local legal aid office.


I hope this helps




Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2019)





Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Expungement could help felons get Jobs

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Friday, September 20, 2019

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record


Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?


Hello,

I have been trying to get a job with an insurance company or large law firms and no one is calling me back. I assume it is because I was arrested in 2002 and plead out to probation. I am not a convicted felon, but that is still on my record. Also, I have an arrest for battery on my record, but the case got thrown out. Can you really help? I received an email from Allstate that they want to set up an interview with me next week. Will this mess me up once they look up my background?


Mattie

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?


Hello Mattie,

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?Let's start at the beginning.  You state that you plead to probation, which means that you were convicted.  I don't know what your conviction was for, but if you were convicted of any type of theft, fraud or robbery, some jobs may not be available to you. 

In case of any other arrests, employers are more concerned with convictions rather that arrests.  That is why the question on applications typically begin with. "Have you been convicted of a crime..."  I encourage all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs to get a copy of their criminal records so that they can answer this question honestly and accurately.  The best place to get this is from your probation officer.  I'm sure he/she can get a copy for you.

When your interview comes, as I advise everyone with a criminal record, answer every question honestly, but never volunteer information.  If the question does come up on the interview like this, "I'm glad you are asking this question, because I want you to feel comfortable hiring me....."  Then briefly explain the circumstance surrounding the infraction.  Spend more time talking about the steps you have taken to overcome that situation.

Don't assume that your legal issues are the reason you are getting few call backs.  Continue to apply for every job you qualify for for.  Don't assume that because you have a record, you won't be considered.

I would also try to find out if expungement in your state.  Expungement essentially means that your criminal record would be hidden from public view.  Once that is done, you may claim not to have a record when responding to the "Have you ever been convicted....." question.  Expungement is a legal process that you should not try alone.  You should contact your local legal aid office to see if your state offers the opportunity for expungement.  You may also qualify for free legal services.



Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record

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Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?

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