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Showing posts with label ex-felon jobs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ex-felon jobs. Show all posts

Saturday, December 22, 2018

Five Bottom Line Reasons Why Employers Should Hire Ex-Felons


Mike Green, Contributor
Co-founder, ScaleUp Partners LLC

Five Bottom Line Reasons Why Employers Should Hire Ex-FelonsThere is no city in the nation that’s growing faster than the population of 70 million Americans with criminal records. As one of them, former real estate developer R.L. Pelshaw is determined to turn this costly societal burden into an opportunity. “With criminal records it’s difficult for many ex-offenders to get jobs making a livable wage,” Pelshaw said. “Showing (ex) criminals how to be successful in legal businesses is far better then returning to crime, and will change the destiny of millions of people.” For employers, there exists a real opportunity to disrupt the continuous cycle of quarantining humans. And for the sake of society at large, sustainable employment may not only represent our best opportunity to significantly disrupt recidivism and the growing population of Americans with criminal records, it may be our only option. Consider the costs. Between 1973 and 2009, the nation’s prison population grew by 705 percent. Over the past two decades costs of incarceration have skyrocketed more than 305 percent, according to a 2011 Pew study. States now spend more than $52B out of their budgets (second only to Medicaid), for incarceration. And the economic impact inherent in the process of policing and locking up those who perpetrate crimes in our communities is compounded by the economic impact of high recidivism rates of 84 percent for males, age 24 years and younger. This revolving door is fueled by a pipeline that has grown exponentially over the past several decades to the point where the United States incarcerates more of its population than any nation in the world. America’s employers must take note of what happens to released inmates when they re-enter society, often after years of being quarantined, and with little hope of finding employment that funds a new path to productive citizenship. In 2012, more than 630,000 inmates were released into targeted communities across America. According to the latest study by the Bureau of Justice, three of every four released prisoners were re-arrested within the five-year life of the study. An extraordinarily high percentage (89 percent) of ex-felons re-arrested were unemployed. Pelshaw is determined to change that. He launched and self-funded a campaign called, The National Hire Ex-Felons Campaign, designed to inform employers of the benefits of tapping into this 70-million-strong workforce. Of course, there are plenty of unemployed people who do not commit crimes. The suggestion is not that employment alone is a panacea for this national problem. But, there is no other immediate option to developing sustainable financial stability for ex-felons. The longer that former inmates remain unemployed following release, the greater the risk they will seek income through alternative means. Their fate impacts the fate of families, communities and ultimately society at large. Employment is one of the tools we have to address this growing problem. Those who pay their debt to society and emerge from prison with a new perspective and lease on life deserve an opportunity to earn a living. They represent a class of prospective employees unlike any other. But, why should employers assume the risk of hiring ex-felons? You may be surprised by these five fact-based, bottom line reasons. Hiring Incentives: Finding good help is a key factor in running a successful business. Too many employers get robbed daily by lazy employees who work with a sense of entitlement, watching the clock, anticipating that moment they can break free of the bonds that trap them in cubicles, offices and warehouses. Many daydream of weekend getaways and play-cations while robotically moving through tasks, diluting the level of worker productivity. Ex-felons are no stranger to hard work. And they are grateful for the opportunity to earn a living. Most believe they have something to prove to their families and employers. But there are additional bottom line incentives to employees who hire former inmates. Substantial tax credits are available for hiring ex-felons, such as the Federal Work Opportunity Tax Credit. Some states even provide partial wage reimbursement, additional tax credits, and other training funds for employers who hire ex-felons.
“We’ve had three (subsidies) that amount to several hundreds of thousands of dollars to bear down on training our employees,” said Mike Hannigan, CEO of Give Something Back. “It’s amazing to me how many resources are available to a company.” Employers who hire felons can also be eligible to obtain a free fidelity bond funded by the federal government to protect them against employee dishonesty or theft. More importantly, credible studies clearly indicate that ex-felons out of prison seven years or more have no higher rate of committing a crime than non-felons. A 2009 University of Maryland study found that people with a criminal record are at no greater criminal risk after they’ve been out seven to 10 years than those with no record. Employee Reliability: Few things hurt a business more than high turnover rates. Employers who spend too much time with a focus on hiring employees who won’t leave shortly thereafter find themselves neglecting other areas of the business that require attention. Ex-felons have far fewer options than conventional employees. Due to the scarcity of opportunities for ex-felons, many employers that hire them have lower turnover than with conventional hires. According to the Partnership for Safety and Justice, many ex-felons have a favorable employment and educational history. “In general, formerly incarcerated people are as reliable as other workers,” the report states, citing numerous studies. Hiring Opportunity: The landscape of employable ex-felons is large. Ex-offenders on probation often have to maintain employment as a condition of release. Most parolees are drug-tested by their probation officer or halfway house at no expense to employers. Most parole officers and halfway houses welcome contact with employers of supervised felons. That supervision de-risks the employment opportunity and is an added value at no cost to the employer. An estimated 6.9 million persons were under supervision of adult correctional systems in 2013, according to the Bureau of Justice. This is a significant, largely untapped and motivated work force. A 2008 study by the Urban Institute Justice Policy Center found that fewer than 45 percent of felons were employed eight months after being released. In real numbers that means more than 3.5 million prospective workers are available for hire. Economic Impact: Employers can make a considerable difference in transforming a criminal liability into a community asset. Unemployed ex-felons are at a greater risk of re-offending compared to employed ex-felons. Many ex-felons turn to crime and return to jail (recidivism) because they can’t find a job paying a livable wage.
“People who break the law need to be held accountable and pay their debt to society,” said Adam Gelb, director of the Pew Center on the States’ Public Safety Performance Project. “At the same time, the collateral costs of locking up 2.3 million people are piling higher and higher.” According to VERA institute of Justice, the U.S. spends nearly40 billion a year to house inmates. The average cost per state to house one inmate is31,286 per year. But if that one felon gets a job instead of returning to prison, he or she now contributes to the economy by more than $10,000 a year, according to a Baylor University study. Crime Market Disruption: An estimated 70 million U.S. adults have arrest or conviction records based on Bureau of Justice statistics. Tougher sentencing laws, especially for drug offenses, have swelled that total. Society can’t afford to simply banish 70 million people from the workplace. Children of incarcerated adults are the highest at-risk group in America. Many follow in their parents’ footsteps, continuing the cycle of crime and fueling a criminal market pipeline. Children of felons are seven times more likely to be incarcerated themselves. They are more likely (23 percent vs 4 percent) to be expelled or suspended from school than other children.
And the criminal market isn’t just isolated to minority populations. Across the nation, 40 percent of young men (regardless of race) will have a police-record encounter before the age of 23. Of those incarcerated, 84 percent will return to prison. It’s a continuous criminal market cycle that costs taxpayers more than $52 billion a year and threatens the stability of families and communities, in particular those already suffering from economic distress. Employing an ex-felon can disrupt the cycle of this criminal market and provides an opportunity to restore stability to families through a solid financial footing. “To fight the vicious circle of crime and recidivism we need to create ways offenders, ex-offenders, those at risk to offend, and those living off crime (but not yet caught) can make money legitimately,” said Pelshaw, who is also the author of Illegal to Legal: Business Success for (ex) Criminals. With more than 630,000 inmates released into neighborhoods across America every year, the community of ex-felons released each year is larger than the population of many major cities. Employers are already discovering the challenges of finding good employees without criminal records. Perhaps it’s time employers considered the benefits of hiring good employees who happen to be ex-felons. Originally seen at Huffingtonpost.com: https://www.huffingtonpost.com/mike-green/five-bottom-line-reasons-_b_8021476.html



Five Bottom Line Reasons Why Employers Should Hire Ex-Felons

Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons 




Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Eric Mayo


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Sunday, December 9, 2018

Tips to Help Ex-Felons Get Jobs

Tips to Help Ex-Felons Get Jobs

 


Tips to Help Ex-Felons Get Jobs
Thanks for stopping by my blog.  You are here because either you have a criminal record and want to put your past behind you by getting a job and becoming a contributing member of society or you want to help someone you really care about.  Getting a job with a criminal record is going to be difficult but not impossible.  I work with ex-felons everyday and many of them get jobs right away while others have to put more work and be more determined to overcome their individual situations.  Here are some important steps that ex-offenders and ex-felons can take to  dramatically increase their opportunity to get hired


 Tips to Help Ex-Felons Get Jobs



Get a Copy of your Criminal Record

At some time during the job search, the question about criminal record is going to come up.  I encourage my students to be totally honest when talking about their background.  The best way to do this is to have an accurate record of your criminal convictions.  If you have a probation or parole officer, he/she can help you get a copy of your record.

Find out if the convictions on your record can be sealed or expunged.  To be clear, NO RECORDS CAN BE ERASED.  If someone tells you that you can erase your record, do not believe them.  There are legal processes that can have certain convictions and charges hidden from public view making your record easier to work with.  Your record, even if hidden from public view, will always be available to all government agencies, court systems and law enforcement.

There are lawyers who make tons of money by using these processes so they are not going to like this but, you can get this done for little or no money.  I suggest to all of my students to contact their local legal aid office.  There you will be able to find out of expungement or sealing is available in your state and what can be done about your record.  If it is an option for you, you can get help getting it done for little or no money.

Get Some Really Good References

Increasingly employers are paying attention to references when considering new employees.  Ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs should be able to provide strong references that will help them make a good impression on employers.  There are employers that will hire a felon and a strong set of references from the right people can help you get hired.

References are upstanding members of the community who would say something positive about you. Good references  could help an employer look past your record. References from religious leaders, teachers, former employers and local political leaders would look great to an employer.

Most employment applications ask for for three references.  You should always have at least four.  Be prepared to list a name, title, and contact information for each one.  Make certain contact information is current and keep it updated.  Over time, phone numbers, titles and addresses change.

Get permission from anybody you want to use as a reference. Let them know that you are looking for a job and a reference from them would really help.  Never offer anyone as a reference without their consent.  Once you have your references all together, keep them in your job search folder for easy access when it is time to fill out an application.

Only offer references when they are requested.  Never put references on a resume.  Include a line on the resume that may say "References will be furnished upon request."

Taking the time to get good references will have a powerful impact on your job search.



Get A Resume

If you are looking for a job without a well written resume, you are at a disadvantage. A resume is a short, concise document that states relevant information regarding your education, skills, experiences, accomplishments, and job-related background. A well written resume will help you present your best qualities to an employer. If you have a resume, have a professional person look at it to judge it's quality. If you do not have a well written resume, I suggest you get some help putting one together.



Dress to Get Hired

First impressions are very important.  What people think upon meeting you depends so much on what they see.  When prospective employers meet you for the first time what will they think they see?  Will they see a potential problem?  Will they see an ex-con trying to get a job?  Will they see a polished professional looking for an opportunity?  That will totally be up to you.

It is important that you look like someone of quality.  A well fitting suit with a nice shirt, a coordinated tie and polished shoes is what most ex-offenders and ex-felons should shoot for.  Your clothing should more for you that anything you say.



Get Some Quality Job Leads

Do you know what type of job you are looking for?  Do you know where open jobs are?  There are many ways to find out where jobs are.

1.  Networking - Networking is the single best way to find out where jobs are.  Networking is simply talking to people you already know to find out if they know about any open positions.

2.  State Job Services - State sponsored employment services have access to job openings and other services that can help you get a job.

3.  Temporary Employment - Companies use temporary employment services when they need help immediately for a certain amount of time.  A temporary agency could have you working on a very short time.  Some temporary assignment turn into permanent jobs.  Temporary agencies cater to a wide array of businesses like offices, restaurants, construction companies and even the medical industry.  Whatever type of work you do, you will be able to find a temporary agency that needs employees.  Check you local telephone directory or search online for agencies in your area and apply just as you would any other employer.

4.   Help Wanted Ads - Help wanted ads can be found in local newspapers. These advertisements can be found in the classifieds section of you daily newspaper, having listings of  open jobs. Ex-offenders and Ex-felons looking for jobs can also use the Internet to find help wanted ads.


Unfortunately, not all job fields are open to ex-offenders and ex-felon and you may not get the job you want right away.  You may have to start at the bottom and work your way up.  Be prepared


Practice Interviewing

The key to successful interviewing is practice.  You will have to practice how to answer questions especially the one you will get that relate to your criminal record.  Find someone to work with you practicing answering questions until you sound convincing.



These tips will get you started on your task of finding a job.  As I said before, it won't be easy, but having determination and working hard will definitely pay off



Tips to Help Ex-Felons Get Jobs



Tips to Help Ex-Felons Get Jobs



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Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Can I teach with an old Felony?

Jobs for Felons:  Can I teach with an old Felony?



Jobs for Felons: Can I teach with an old Felony?
I am a Black Man in America in 2018. I am having difficulty getting any employment because of a 1977 felony conviction. Since I got out in 1979, I got my college degree and two teaching licenses in two states-Indiana and Illinois. My “inability” to get employment seems as if this is nothing but a higher form of Jim Crow.

I realize that I am not by myself but this appears so unfair to people that are trying to live a totally new life.  So many people talk about “rehabilitation” but it seems as if it is just talk. I have also been a member of NA and AA for 32 years. I had a drug problem and I knew that if I resumed my habit, I would have returned to the penitentiary. I took care of that first because it was so important to do that.

I taught school for the public schools system for 13 years. I disclosed my felony conviction to the school system and it didn’t pose a problem to the system. Why is it posing a problem now?

I served my time and I have totally changed my life. Will I have to pay for this the rest of my life.  I was 26 years old when this happened and I am now 64 years old.

The law needs to be changed. Once a person serves his/her time that should be the end of it.
I don’t understand how I taught for the school system for 13 years and my background was disclosed.
There also has been no recidivism in my case. I can understand people going back to the penitentiary but I have only gone once. What I have done with my life should matter but it does not.  I always thought that the goal of incarceration was rehabilitation. Is it really?? Incarceration has become a viable business.

People can change their lives. By not allowing someone to change their life is such a grave mistake.
Why shouldn’t I be bitter? I will never give up in what seems as if an uphill battle. Racism is still here. I could care less about having a Black president.


 Jobs for Felons:  Can I teach with an old Felony?


Hello,

That's quite a story.  I'm not sure why you were let go after so many years even though you disclosed the conviction at the time of your hire.  As for having a Black President, the food he eats doesn't fill my belly.

Jobs for Felons: Can I teach with an old Felony?It's easy to be discouraged and start doubting yourself and society as a whole.  Instead, lets concentrate on some things that perhaps we haven't though about before as alternatives.  Don't give up hope of being a teacher.  In fact, you have already done the hard part.  You have a degree and you are already certified.  You have another very important quality.  You have experience and the wisdom and maturity of an older person.  All you will need now is to find teaching opportunities where your conviction will matter a lot less than it does to the public school system.  There are many alternatives to teaching in the public school system.  In fact I encourage many of my students who are ex-offenders and felons and also have college degrees to pursue teaching as a career.  Let's look at a few options.

Private Schools  - These schools are supported by a private organization or private individuals rather than by the government and therefore may have quite different eligibility requirements.

Career Schools - A career or vocational school is different from a four year college.  Instead of taking four years to get a degree, a vocational school allows students to get specialized training in specific career fields in two years or less.  These schools also require courses in general subjects like math, English and science just like traditional colleges.

Community Colleges - Community colleges, sometimes called junior colleges, are two-year schools that provide affordable education as a pathway to a four-year degree or a particular career.
Community colleges prepare students for jobs that require higher education or workforce training.  Typically community colleges work with employers to develop flexible, affordable and relevant training programs and partner with businesses which meet local commercial and regional economic needs. These colleges also have traditional degree programs.

Charter Schools - Charter schools are independent schools that have received a charter, which is a set of self-written rules and goals which determine how the school will be structured and run. Generally, they are able to organize a school that operates outside the control of the local school district but still funded by local, state, and federal tax money.  Essentially charter schools are free public schools that don't have to follow the same regulations as the local school district.

These are just a few options I can think of just off the top of my head. There maybe a lot more but this is a start.  If you are fortunate enough to get interviews, be prepared to talk about your conviction.  As I tell all of my students in your position, when asked about the conviction, briefly speak about it and how it has changed your thinking and your approach to life.  Focus the conversation on the time that has passed and what you have done since then to improve yourself and how you have used your own experiences to encourage young people not to make the same mistakes that you have.

Just don't let your recent stumble keep you from moving forward.

Best of luck to you.



 Jobs for Felons: Can I teach with an old Felony?


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)



Jobs for Felons:  Can I teach with an old Felony?


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons


Eric Mayo

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Monday, June 25, 2018

Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career

 Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career

Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career
I wanted to personally thank you for your information and motivational reassurance that with hard work and good intentions, there will be results.  I am a 32 year female and have had 11 years in the medical field specifically with management and administration.

My last job was the best by far working on a military base as a Tricare representative.  The Dept. of Defense made cuts across all 50 states and my position was eliminated.  Upon my return back home to California from Las Vegas, I allowed myself a little "vacation party time".  My choice one fateful afternoon does not represent  me professionally nor personally but just a "social choice,"  rather one of the biggest lessons in my life.  I am now faced with a Felony charge for possession and with no priors whatsoever, clean image, and of course I will be in excellent standing during my probation period of 2 years....I am now faced with the realization that the next few years and advancing my career in the health field will be impaired.  However not impossible. I will also add that I do not have an addiction and am actually a very nice, sweet, and caring girl.  Nevertheless these things happen for a reason and I want to be like you one day to share my experience and assist others in this unique situation.

With the assistance of my lawyer and definite proof of good behavior, we anticipate for the charges to be lowered to a misdemeanor charge, fees/fines paid for asap, and records to be sealed in 2 years.  I am reaching out to my network of resources in both private practice and small businesses.  There are things I can do to generate income but I want to still have my foot in the health field for my work record.  If it were not for your information regarding the Work Opportunity Tax Credit and Federal Bonding Program, I would not have the reassurance I have at this moment sitting at the library typing to you.  

I am going to get my hands on your book also to have as an additional resource.  If I ever get the opportunity to meet you Sir in person then I will thank you but as for now you are a beacon of light in my tunnel.  

I hope you and your family are well Sir. 


Sincerely,

 Michelle


 Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career

 

Hello Michelle,

Thank you for your kind words.  I tell every ex-offender I meet who is looking for a job is to put a plan together and follow through with it.  Work the plan and never give up.  

Everyone may not have the resources to hire a lawyer, but there are places to go for help.  Your local legal aid office is a good place to get low-cost or even free legal advice regarding the possible downgrading of their charges or expungement if available.  The thing about expungement is, even if it is granted, your record will always be available to law enforcement, government agencies and the court system.  

As I advise any felon looking for a medical career.  Please check with the medical board in your state to see if your conviction will keep you from being licensed or certified.  

Probation and parole officers often have information about serviced available in your area that could offer assistance to ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs.  

Having a criminal record is not the end of the world.  It may make getting hired a bit more difficult but with a plan and hard work, you can overcome a bad situation.  Felons and ex-offenders a get jobs everyday so don't give up!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record

 Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career



Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


   Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career


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Thursday, December 28, 2017

Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?

Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?

Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?
I have been reading your blog for a while.  I applied to some of your some of the employers on your list but I have not been contacted by any one of them.  My cousin works at one of them.  She has a record too.  Why can she get a job and I can't?  What can I do?


Kathryn from Marietta, GA


Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?



Hello Kathryn,

I'm sorry you are having so much trouble finding a job.  Regarding our List of Companies that Hire Felons, many people are confused by this list.  The employers on the list will not hire you just because you are a felon.  These employers hire a felon if he or she is the best person for the job.

I have been working with felons for a long time and I find that the most difficult felon to help get hired are those with any type of sex offense.  Plain and simple, most employers want nothing to do with sex offenders.  Their best opportunities to get hired is to apply for jobs that have limited contact with people. Unfortunately, most sex offenders cannot work anywhere near schools, parks or anywhere there are children.  This makes things a lot more difficult for them

The next most difficult group, are those with any type of what I call integrity crimes.  Those with any type of theft, robbery, forgery, identity theft, fraud and similar convictions have a difficult time.  They have little opportunity for retail jobs or any jobs that require trust of any kind.

The third most difficult convictions to work with are violent crimes.  Applicants with any type of assault or weapons convictions are a concern to employers and they are often avoided.  Once again, those with any type of violent crimes may have more success applying for jobs that require minimal contact with other people.

I don't know what your conviction(s) or what types of jobs you have been applying for, but I hope this sheds some light on your situation.

Finding a job is not an exact science.  People without criminal records don't always get jobs they apply for.  The best advice I can give you is to apply for every job you feel qualified for.  The more jobs you apply for, the greater opportunities you will have to get interviews.  The more interviews you get, the more opportunities you will have to get a job

Best of luck to you.




Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where Ex-offenders and Felons Can Find Jobs




Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal record




Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?


Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Felons can get Jobs


Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?


Eric Mayo

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Tuesday, January 31, 2017

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

 Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?


 Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

Local mechanic donates auto shop to help train ex-offenders

I am a felon with four burglary charges on my record, two class 2 felonies, and 2 class 3.  I live in the southwest and have been out of prison for almost 2 yrs.  I am on probation for another year.

I was convicted in May of 2011.  Since I have been out, I have attended and graduated from a. automotive institute with a diploma in diesel mechanic. I graduated almost 3 months ago and can't get a company to call me back or even give me a chance.  Even my school does not give me job leads like they have all of the guys I graduated with.  I'm sure it is because of my record.

I just want to ask you a question. With my record do you think any companies with good benefits ever give me a chance?  I feel like I have wasted my time and the last year of my life attending school.

If you have any advice, I would appreciate it.

Thank you, sincerely,


Bobby

 Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

 

Hello Bobby,

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?It seems that you are waiting for a job to come to you.  That probably won't happen.  I tell all of my students that finding a job is hard work.  Finding a job with a criminal record is harder work.  Ex-offenders and felons face tougher challenges the job seekers without records. 

One option would be to contact trucking companies in your area to see if they service their own trucks.  Because you don't have much hands-on experience you should apply as a mechanic's helper.  This means starting at the bottom, but you will gain valuable experience working with veteran mechanics. Often when you want something it means paying some dues.  Try applying at smaller independent companies.   This will also work at garages that service diesel trucks.  You can get a list of trucking companies and garages in your area from your local phone directory.  Another option is applying to national automotive service chains such as Pep Boys also as a helper.  In both cases I suggest you be totally honest about your past if questioned.

You may also find lists of open positions in your area at your local One-stop Career Center.  The center will also have other resources that can prepare you for a successful job search such as resume writing and interview preparation.  You can find your local One-stop Career Center at the link below.

http://www.servicelocator.org

Best of luck to you 


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Eric Mayo

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Can I Get a Job as a Mechanic with a Criminal Record?


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