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Wednesday, May 15, 2019

Felons must properly prepare for the job search to be successful

Felons must properly prepare for the job search to be successful


Felons must properly prepare for the job search to be successful
Ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs often have a very hard time.  Their criminal backgrounds often make it a little more difficult to get hired than the average  job seeker. Jobs for felons will be a lot easier to obtain with hard work and proper preparation.

A successful job search will require the right tools. The first step will be assessing your tools which are your set of skills.  Are you able to tell a prospective employer what you can do in ten minutes or less.  If not, I suggest you make a list of your skills and be prepared to talk about them in a way that the employer will see the benefit.

Do you have a list of your previous employers handy for when it is time to complete an application?  Don't wait until you have fill out one to look for this information.  If your past jobs were on record and you had taxes taken out, you can get a list from the Social Security Administration.  Check the blue pages of your local telephone book for the nearest office nearest to you.

Felons must properly prepare for the job search to be successful
Next, you will need proper documentation.  Do you three forms of identification?  You will need ID to get a job.  You can get a copy of your Social Security card at your local office.  Below is a link to the application for a replacement cards along with instructions.  It will give you a head start.

http://www.ssa.gov/online/ss-5.pdf


Birth Certificate

To obtain a copy of your birth certificate, contact the office of vital statistics in the city where you were born.

Valid Driver’s License

To obtain a copy of your driver’s license, contact your local motor vehicle agency.  It is listed in your local telephone directory.  Your local motor vehicle agency may even offer “Identification Only” cards if you do not have a driver’s license.

Photo Identification

Many county agencies provide photo identification cards. 

Green Card or Visa (if applicable)

To obtain copies of your visa or alien registration card contact the office of Immigration and Naturalization.  You can get the process of renewing or replacing your green card here:


Everyone looking for employment should have a resume.  A resume will help you  to present your best qualities in one neat package.  It is a summary of your background, experience, training and skills.  If you have a resume, have someone look at it to judge it's quality.  If you do not have a well written resume, I suggest you get some help putting one together.  You should leave a copy of your resume with everyone you speak to about a job

Next,  do you have the right interview clothing?  A well fitting suit with a nice shirt and tie would be perfect thing to wear.  A new suit may not be possible for someone just getting back to the real world but I suggest that men at least have dress slacks, a light colored shirt and a matching tie.  You should also have a pair of shoes that you can shine.  Not boots, not sneakers…shoes!  Many ex-offenders and felons get their interview clothing at thrift stores.  They find quality clothes at very low prices, clean and press them and they are ready to do their best to get a job.  No matter how you get them, the right clothes makes all the difference.

Lastly, you have to find really good job leads, a great place to start finding job leads is your local One-stop Career Center.  You will not only find job leads in your area but you can get help with your resume and and other resources that can help in your job search.  You can find the nearest One Stop Career Center Here:  http://www.careeronestop.org/LocalHelp/service-locator.aspx

Here you will find open jobs in your area as well as a long list of Companies that Hire Ex-offenders and Felons:  Click Here

This is a great start to a successful job search.  Brush up on your interviewing skills and you will be ready to compete for a job.

Good Luck!

 Felons must properly prepare for the job search to be successful


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Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record





Felons must properly prepare for the job search to be successful

Felons must properly prepare for the job search to be successful



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

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Thursday, May 9, 2019

Felon needs a job for a new start

Felon needs a job for a new start


Felon needs a job for a new start
Dear Mr. Mayo,

I read your book and its a really good book.   I was wondering if in any way you can help me.  At the age of 17 (in 2002), I was accused and convicted of possession of a controlled substance.  Under the felony conviction, I received two years of intense probation which required me to be tested for drugs once a month, see my probation officer once a month and pay a $10.00 per month restitution charge.
 
In 2003 after being on probation for six months, I incurred a new felony charge, which violated the terms of my probation.  At the age of 18, they found cocaine on me I was charged with possession, intent to deliver and manufacturing of drugs. Both of my court cases were ran concurrently.  I received a four year sentence and served 18 mos in the Illinois Department of Corrections.
 
While being incarcerated, I took responsibility for my actions, paid the penalty for the crime and have been rehabilitated.  At the age of 17 and 18, I was young, immature and a victim of my circumstances.  I lived in a poverty-stricken neighborhood infested with drugs and economic injustice.  This is not an excuse for the crime I committed.  However, I became of product of my environment.  When I was exposed to better opportunities, I wanted to change my life and make a difference in my life and community.  I made immature mistakes and have since changed my life for the better.
 
 
Since being released from the Illinois Department of Corrections in 2007, I completed various training programs:  a Medical Assistant Program at Everest College in Merrionette Park IL and a Cosmetology Program at Canella Beauty School in Blue Island, Illinois.  I am trying to educate myself and make a positive contribution to society.
 
Eight years later at the age of 27, I pose no threat to society and would like to use my compassion and skills to help others in the healthcare industry.  In addition, I currently take care of my elderly uncle (age 70) who has multiple health issues. I currently have me CNA certificate I have been looking for a job for a while now and nobody doesn't want to give me a chance. I was wondering if you can help me.  I have been given a waiver for my convictions through Illinois Department of Public Health and every place I apply to tell me they doesn't accept waivers.  I've tried everything I really need your Sir. 

Angela


Felon needs a job for a new start

 

Hello Angela,

I'm sorry you are having so much trouble.  It seems that you are really trying to get together.  Unfortunately there are some obstacles.  You have a Cosmetology certificate.  If that is what you want to do, you should apply to small, independent hair salons.  You may have to start at the bottom by washing hair etc., but often if you want more, you have to pay your dues.

If you want a career in the medical field, as I often suggest to ex-offenders and felons looking for employment is to apply for temporary employment. There are temporary agencies that service the field of medicine.  Often companies end up hiring their temporary help. There is a twist for ex-offenders and felons when it comes to applying for temporary assignments. They should apply at smaller independent temporary employment agencies. Independent agencies don't have to deal with restrictions larger agencies may have placed on them by their parent companies as they relate to hiring ex-offenders and felons. They are free to hire anyone they choose. You can find listing in your local telephone directory and apply as you would any other job.  There are also home health aide and visiting nurse services that you also should apply to.

I also strongly recommend to all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs is to go to the nearest One-stop Career Center.  There you will find a list of services that can help you find a job.  There are also trained counselors to assist you.  Many of these counselors have experience working with those who have criminal backgrounds and may know which employers have a history of hiring ex-offenders and felons.  You can find you nearest One-stop Career Center here:


Whenever you get an interview, remember to tell the interviewer that you can be bonded.  The Federal Bonding Program provides fidelity bonding insurance coverage to individuals with criminal histories and other high-risk job applicants who are qualified, but fail to get jobs because regular commercial bonding is denied due to their backgrounds.

Applications for federal bonding can be obtained through any Illinois Department of Employment Security (IDES) office or Illinois Employment Training Center (IETC)

    Contact:
    Re-entry Employment Service Program
    33 South State Street
    Chicago, IL 60603
    312-793-1107    


If you ever have an interview with a private employer, mention that they may be eligible for a federal tax credit just by giving you a chance.  The Work Opportunity Tax Credit (WOTC) is a federal tax credit to reduce the federal tax liability of private for profit employers to be used as an incentive for employers to hire individuals from eight different targeted groups: TANF recipients, veterans, ex-felons, high risk youth, summer youth, Food Stamp recipients, SSI recipients, and vocational rehabilitation referrals.

 
Contact:
 
State wide Program Manager WOTC
33 South State Street
Chicago, IL 60612


312-793-1597

 
Web Site: www.ides.illinois.gov/page.aspx?item=80



I hope this helps.

Ex-offenders and convicted felons can get jobs with Federal Bonding Program






Felon needs a job for a new start


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Felon needs a job for a new start

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Monday, May 6, 2019

Felons can Use a Certificate of Rehabilitation to get Jobs

Felons can Use a Certificate of Rehabilitation to get Jobs
Many ex-offenders and felons find it very difficult to find jobs after serving their sentences. There are some legal tools that are available that can be used that will make the difficult task of getting hired with a criminal record easier. One of these tools is the Certificate of Rehabilitation. It has also been known as Certificate of Relief from Disabilities or Restoration of Rights or Certificate of Good Conduct.

A Certificate of Rehabilitation is a court order, which declares that a person who has been
convicted of a felony is rehabilitated.  If a petition for a Certificate of Rehabilitation is granted, it
is forwarded to the Governor by the granting court and constitutes an application for a pardon.  (In
some cases the granting of a Certificate of Rehabilitation relieves some offenders from the sexual
offender registration requirement.)

If granted a certificate, one may be eligible to be certified in some fields that were previously closed because of the nature of one's conviction

Currently there are 14 states (and Washington, D.C.) in total that offer certificates of rehabilitation:


  •  Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Connecticut
  • District of Columbia
  • Georgia
  •  Illinois
  • Nevada
  • New York
  • New Jersey
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Rhode Island
  • Tennessee
  • Vermont
Each state has it own requirements for those who wish to apply for a Certificate of Rehabilitation.  Application for a certificate is a legal process that should only be handled by a legal professional.  You must get assistance from a qualified professional.  Contact your local Legal Aid office where you may be able to get free or nearly free assistance applying for a certificate.

Legal Aid attorneys may know of employers who have hired ex-offenders and felons in your area.


Felons can Use a Certificate of Rehabilitation to get Jobs


4 Benefits of a "Certificate of Rehabilitation"






Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Certificate of Rehabilitation | Certificate of Relief from Disabilities | Certificate of Good Conduct

Felons can Use a Certificate of Rehabilitation to get Jobs

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Friday, May 3, 2019

Felon with college education needs a job

Felon with college education needs a job


Felon with college education needs a job
My husband has a felony, the charge is lewd and lascivious. It was an incident that happened about 6 years ago before we met. He had a drinking problem at the time and has not drank any alcohol in the past 5 years. After serving 7 months in prison for this crime he got out and went back to school.

He started at a community college and went on to be accepted to the Kansas University school of business and graduated with a degree in accounting with distinction which is no small feat! He graduated in December of '16 and has since been unable to find a job in his field.

He has had one offer that was later taken back after seeing his charge on paper and several interviews for jobs where I know he would have got them if it weren't for this charge. We tried to get it expunged but were unsuccessful. The judge did say we should try again later as he wasn't saying no forever. My husband is becoming increasingly disappointed and losing hope. He is a great, intelligent and changed man.

What more can we do?


Felon with college education needs a job



My suggestion is to apply for jobs by letter of application. By applying for jobs this way often allows ex-offenders and felons to get around the application process and never have to mention that he has a criminal record.  Many professional job seekers never fill out applications.  They send application letters to employers.  Take a look at the sample letter below.  It will give you an idea of how to put an application letter together.






































Perhaps the best advice I can give anyone looking for a job, is to apply for all jobs you are qualified for.  Often felons will not apply for jobs because they feel that they will be rejected.  That is not a good practice.  Never eliminate yourself from jobs by not applying.  The more jobs you apply for, the better your opportunity to get interviews.

As far as applying for expungement,  this a legal process that I advise that you don't try without assistance.  I suggest contacting your local legal aid office.  you will find attorneys that can offer low cost and often even no cost assistance with getting this process done in an effective way.

I hope this helps.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Sending resumes and Cover Letters


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon with college education needs a job



Felon with college education needs a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

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Thursday, April 25, 2019

Companies that Hire Ex-Offenders Can Get a Tax Credit, But Very Few Actually Claim It


Companies that Hire Ex-Offenders Can Get a Tax Credit, But Very Few Actually Claim It
By 

April has been recognized as “Second Chance Month” since 2017 as part of a bipartisan effort to push criminal justice reform. This year, President Trump has announced that he wants to cut unemployment among ex-offenders—currently around 27%, according to the Prison Policy Initiative—to single digits within five years. The most efficient way to do that is to modify the Work Opportunity Tax Credit.

A job provides needed income and adds structure to a person’s day; it’s no surprise that studies have shown employment can reduce the chance of re-offending by about 20%. Jobs for ex-offenders benefit everyone in a community.

That’s one reason ex-offenders are included in the class of applicants employers are encouraged to consider by an incentive known as Work Opportunity Tax Credits. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit is a provision of the Internal Revenue Code that authorizes a tax credit for companies that hire from certain populations, like veterans, recipients of certain entitlement programs, and people with felony records. Employers submit eligible new hires to claim a tax credit equal to a percentage of an employee’s wages.

More than job training or education, the WOTC holds promise for people leaving prison whose applications may not be as competitive as others. It also encourages higher wages since the tax credit is a proportion of what employees are paid.

In its current form, the WOTC isn’t as effective as it can be. The law applies only to those who are hired within one year of the date of their conviction or release from prison, whichever is later. In that respect, it may limit eligibility only to first-time users of the program; no job applicant can be certified twice if they need another job after that first year.

But as many as 45% of released prisoners don’t have a job in that first year of release. According to a study completed by the Brookings Institution last year, only 55% of released prisoners have any earnings at all during the first year they’re home. Very often, by the time they land a job, their eligibility for the WOTC is gone.

This might explain why the WOTC appears to suffer from underutilization. For instance, Oklahoma, the nation’s leading incarcerator, certified only 1,465 people in fiscal 2018 in the “ex-felon” category. New York, a state with approximately 47,100 inmates and 36,410 parolees, certified only 1,534 people for the WOTC. In 2014, an average of 41,866 people were on parole in California, yet only 527 eligible felons were certified to give their employers the tax credit.

The Labor Department reports that, for fiscal 2018, only 85,796 people with criminal records were certified as eligible employees—and this among a sea of an estimated 626,000 people who leave custody every year.

While it’s possible that 500,000 of those released people are ineligible because they’re beyond the one-year cutoff for the WOTC, any underutilization may stem from the inherent conflict between two policies that have same overarching goal: to help disadvantaged individuals secure employment.

Employers aren’t allowed to know of an applicant’s criminal record and eligibility under “Ban the Box” statutes—laws that remove felony conviction checkboxes from job applications.

Awareness of the WOTC benefit needs to grow and may very well do so on its own if aspiring hires can disclose their eligibility; but they won’t disclose if they’re prohibited from doing so. Ban the Box advocates have been so busy hiding people’s records to remove a disadvantage in hiring that they forego leveraging an advantage. We don’t know how many people who weren’t hired because of the eventual disclosure of their criminal record would have been offered a job if the company knew of the potential tax benefit.

There is a way to protect people’s understandable desire to both hide their record and also signal to employers that hiring them can bring a tax benefit. It involves not banning the box but revising it; a box asking of an applicant is a member of the groups covered by the WOTC would hide a criminal record while also informing businesses of the tax credit if hired.

It true that the stigma of criminal conviction prevents many people from being hired. It’s unclear whether the WOTC is enough to overcome preconceived ideas about released prisoners. The little evidence we have on this, a survey of companies in Connecticut by a small nonprofit, the Malta Justice Initiative, says employers are likely to respond to expanded tax incentives. 73% of respondents indicated a tax credit would motivate hiring managers; subsidies would entice 76% of them.

The Work Opportunity Tax Credit is authorized through the end of 2019 through the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act. Its reauthorization process will now involve criminal justice reform insider Senator Chuck Grassley who is the new Chair of the Senate Finance Committee and Vice-Chair of the Joint Committee on Taxation. Grassley’s dedication to reforming the reentry process and his new positions prime him to optimize the tax code to help meet the president’s employment goal.

Amending the WOTC to expand eligibility beyond one year would likely go a long way in helping released prisoners secure employment as well as provide a boon to businesses.

Chandra Bozelko is the Vice President of the National Society of Newspaper Columnists and writes the Webby award-winning blog Prison Diaries.


Introduction to the Work Opportunity Tax Credit




Companies that Hire Ex-Offenders Can Get a Tax Credit, But Very Few Actually Claim It

Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Companies that Hire Ex-Offenders Can Get a Tax Credit, But Very Few Actually Claim It


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