Find us on Google+ Jobs for Felons: How felons can get jobs
  • Home
  • About Me
  • Ask Me A Question
Showing posts with label hire ex-offenders. Show all posts
Showing posts with label hire ex-offenders. Show all posts

Monday, June 3, 2019

Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life

Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life



Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life
I work with people with criminal records who want to get jobs and turn their lives around.  I tell them that there are three things they must change to put their pasts behind them.  The have to change the places they go, change the things they do and most importantly change the people they spend time with.

No matter how hard you work to get your life in order, certain types of people will drain energy from you and in the end will ruin all of your efforts.  If you want to give yourself the best opportunity for success, you must remove these types of people from your life:


1. Haters

These people are never happy for anyone - including YOU!  They never encourage anyone or happy about anyone else's success.  They may be your friend, but they will not be happy if you are successful.  In fact they will probably have something negative to say or devalue whatever you accomplish.

2.  Manipulators

Manipulators are very sneaky.  They pretend to be friends.  They may know a lot about you and use what they know to get you to do what they want.

3.  Unreliable People

These people never show up on time, never do what they say they will do and know matter how many favors you have done for them, always have an excuse when you need a favor from them.

4.  People who love to Argue

These people will argue with anyone, anywhere, about anything.  They don't even have to know what they are talking about, they will argue.  It you say something is up, they will say its down.  These people will drain your energy and bring you down every time.

5.  Gossips

These people talk about other people all of time.  They can't help themselves.  They will even try to involve you in their gossiping.   Because they can't help themselves, they will also talk about you, when you aren't around.


6. Time Wasters

These people usually have no goals and very little going for them so they have no sense of time.  Because they have no sense of time, they have no problem with wasting yours.  They may try to have you join them playing video games or talking about thing that really have no value.  When you look up, you have wasted valuable time that you could have devoted to doing something positive.

7. Drama Queens and Kings

These people always bring drama wherever they go.  They always have some type of negativity going on at all times.  They do not get along with others and have often start the nonsense.  Be careful you might one day become part of the drama.

8.  Naysayers

These are people who are constantly tell you what cannot be done.  They will always tell you why you shouldn't do something rather than the good things that could happen.  If you let them, they will attempt to crush your dreams and goals.

9. Victims

These people constantly talk about what life has done to them or how someone has done them wrong.  They never talk about what they are doing to make the situation better.  They just complain and wallow in self-pity.

10. Dishonest People

These are the people who lie, cheat and steal on a regular basis.  Dishonest people always will have trouble because they are not to be trusted.  Who wants to be around people that cannot trust?


Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life



If you are trying to build a new life for yourself, eliminate these people.  The more time you spend with them, their habits and attitude will slowly rub off on you.

You deserve to have positive, supportive and loving people in your life. Getting rid of some people is addition by subtraction.  In fact, life is too short to spend time with people who do not want you to succeed or help you to be better.  Not everyone in your life is meant to stay there.


companies that hire felons



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life

Read More

Friday, May 3, 2019

Felon with college education needs a job

Felon with college education needs a job


Felon with college education needs a job
My husband has a felony, the charge is lewd and lascivious. It was an incident that happened about 6 years ago before we met. He had a drinking problem at the time and has not drank any alcohol in the past 5 years. After serving 7 months in prison for this crime he got out and went back to school.

He started at a community college and went on to be accepted to the Kansas University school of business and graduated with a degree in accounting with distinction which is no small feat! He graduated in December of '16 and has since been unable to find a job in his field.

He has had one offer that was later taken back after seeing his charge on paper and several interviews for jobs where I know he would have got them if it weren't for this charge. We tried to get it expunged but were unsuccessful. The judge did say we should try again later as he wasn't saying no forever. My husband is becoming increasingly disappointed and losing hope. He is a great, intelligent and changed man.

What more can we do?


Felon with college education needs a job



My suggestion is to apply for jobs by letter of application. By applying for jobs this way often allows ex-offenders and felons to get around the application process and never have to mention that he has a criminal record.  Many professional job seekers never fill out applications.  They send application letters to employers.  Take a look at the sample letter below.  It will give you an idea of how to put an application letter together.






































Perhaps the best advice I can give anyone looking for a job, is to apply for all jobs you are qualified for.  Often felons will not apply for jobs because they feel that they will be rejected.  That is not a good practice.  Never eliminate yourself from jobs by not applying.  The more jobs you apply for, the better your opportunity to get interviews.

As far as applying for expungement,  this a legal process that I advise that you don't try without assistance.  I suggest contacting your local legal aid office.  you will find attorneys that can offer low cost and often even no cost assistance with getting this process done in an effective way.

I hope this helps.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Sending resumes and Cover Letters


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon with college education needs a job



Felon with college education needs a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Read More

Monday, March 18, 2019

REASONS WHY EMPLOYERS SHOULD HIRE EX-CONVICTS

A criminal record shouldn’t always be a dealbreaker when it comes to hiring. 


 REASONS WHY EMPLOYERS SHOULD HIRE EX-CONVICTS
Martha Stewart. Johnny Cash. Mahatma Gandhi. Reese Witherspoon. Susan B. Anthony.

Each of these individuals garnered fame for their talents, be it on screen or in inciting significant social and cultural changes. What do they all have in common other than celebrity status?

They all have an arrest record. 

Just hearing the term “ex-con” makes one think of fearsome beings that serve no use to society other than keeping a prison cell occupied. The thing is, one-third of working adults in the U.S. possess a criminal record, and not all of them fit the stereotype of a grizzled, unhinged, tattooed entity that we see in TV shows and movies. Some individuals had a terrible upbringing and turned their lives around behind bars, while others were in the wrong place at the wrong time.

Since humans are imperfect by nature, hiring managers and business owners ought to consider cutting some slack to those who have repaid their debt to society. All things considered, there are certain crimes that are more forgivable than others (i.e. petty larceny vs. first-degree murder). Depending on the nature of the crime, how long ago it occurred, and the industry an offender is looking to work in, hiring managers and business owners should keep an open mind when a prospective employee reveals a criminal history.

As it turns out, employing a felon has more benefits than you think:

  • An ex-con is less likely to re-offend when employed. By having a schedule and people depending on them to do a job, they’re less inclined to slip back into old habits.

  • Your organization could receive tax benefits for hiring someone with a record. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit is a Federal tax credit available to employers for hiring those who have difficulties gaining employment, such as possessing a criminal record.

  • They have intense vocational training. Many prisons provide job and educational programs that prepare them to reintegrate into society.

  • There is a lower turnover of personnel. They worked very hard to get a job with you in the first place, which means they’re going to work hard to keep it.
  • To an outsider, your company will be considered a beacon of hope to those who are looking to get their lives straightened out. It can take a lot of courage to give someone a second chance, and by doing so, it can humanize your business. 

For those who have never been arrested, it’s easy to turn away someone with a stain on their record. However, just because a bad decision was made does not make an individual any less worthy of having something to offer society.

Recall those arrested individuals I listed above. Martha inspired us to find joy in decorating, crafting, cooking, and baking. Johnny was, and always will be, our Man in Black. Gandhi told us to be the change we wish to see in the world. Reese got us hooked on Big Little Lies and her Draper James dresses. Susan helped get American women the right to vote.

We all make mistakes. We all have something to offer in spite of our pasts. Let’s not be too quick to judge, shall we?

This article first appeared at virginia.ourcommunitynow.com


 Companies that hire felons



Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Read More

Monday, January 28, 2019

The Next Step in Getting Felons on the Right Path and Into the Workplace

By JIM GERAGHTY, National Review


The Next Step in Getting Felons on the Right Path and Into the Workplace

The next step, announced today at the Koch network’s winter meeting, is a “getting back to work initiative” designed to follow up on the legislation, launched in partnership with the Society for Human Resource Management, the trade association for human resources employees. The initiative will inform businesses on how to recruit, hire, and keep employees who were previously incarcerated.

Charles Koch told the assembled members of the network, “when you hear that one out of four [Americans have a criminal record], this isn’t just some small isolated piece, this involves everybody throughout society.”

SHRM’s CEO Johnny Taylor said his organization had found that as many as 80 percent of employers supported the idea of hiring felons – but a much smaller percentage had actually hired many. They found three main obstacles among employers. The first obstacle was legal compliance issues, including most federal agencies and contractors that deal with security issues or require a federal security clearance. The second was the perception of civil liability on the part of employers, and a fear that hiring a felon could lead to a lawsuit if the felon committed a crime on the job. The third, Taylor said, was a psychological NIBMY (Not In My Backyard) mentality – that plenty of employers and employees liked the idea of hiring felons, but not at their own workplaces. He’s hoping the “employer toolkit” offered by SHRM and the Koch network will mitigate those forces.

Taylor admitted the liability issue was one of the most challenging, as the potential legal risk to employers varied from state to state. He noted that studies indicate that felons who had been released from prison were no more likely to commit crimes in the workplace than employees with no criminal records.



“Regardless of the employee, you do your diligence,” said Mark Holden, the general counsel for Koch Industries. “We’ve been hiring people with criminal records for as long as I’ve been here, about quarter of a century, and we’ve never had that issue. When you hire someone, either way, you’re taking a chance on them. We’ve hired people from the best schools, from the best background, and we’ve later found they’ve stolen from us.”

Taylor said that depending upon the measuring stick, there are anywhere from 6.6 million to 7 million unfilled jobs in the United States right now, and each year, roughly 650,000 people leave prison and reenter society.

“The First Step Act’s prison reform elements include education and skill training,” Holden said. “More people are going to be coming out for prison skilled and ready to go, ready to get back in the game. When employers choose to put applications of convicted felons in the wastepaper basket, it’s a huge wasted opportunity. A lot of these people are very hungry and very humble.”

Chris Wright, the chief executive officer of Liberty Oilfield Services, said that in his experience, released felons “have a passion to prove themselves. Really, you’re hiring the heart. If they’re going to work hard when no one is looking, and if they’re someone who will do the right thing, even under stress, you’re going to win.”

Holden noted that the while the Koch network pushed for the First Step Act and is eager to see America’s businesses start hiring the recently released, they oppose government mandates requiring employers to hire felons, and want to see employers freely embrace the option.




companies that hire felons




Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record




Eric Mayo

Read More

Thursday, January 17, 2019

Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice

Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice

 
Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice
I recently was hired at a nursing home and was railed through all the pre employment paper work everyone goes threw these days. I had a drug test, back ground check and had to submit my fingerprints. Well I got a call that something was found in my back ground that has to be looked into further. All they information I was given was that the incident occurred in 2003 making me 16 and I of course knew right away what it was. I was charged with a misdemeanor and did 1 year probation. I like many other people had it seal away because I was a juvenile. Can they not hire me because of this? This is the only thing I have ever done in my entire life. I have never been arrested nor even gotten pulled over. My adult record is clean.


Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice


Hello,

I'm not sure where you live but most states seal juvenile records from the public. In most cases they are only visible to law enforcement, the court system and government agencies. The one instance that it would not be sealed is the case of a sexual offense. If that is not your situation, you should seek legal advice as to why your offense is visible.

Many ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs often need legal advice. I suggest your local legal aid office.

I hope this helps.


How to get your Juvenile Record Expunged



How can a juvenile record affect my child's life?



Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Juvenile offender wants Job Search Advice

Read More

Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Ex-offender may need help to get a job.

Ex-offender may need help to get a job


 Ex-offender may need help to get a job
Hello,

I came across your blog while looking for work. First, I would like to say how much appreciate your time and efforts in providing helpful information for ex-offenders. I have read through most of the posts and your advice has given me some hope in finding work.

I was convicted of a misdemeanor charge of burglary. This occurred over 10 years ago. I didn't serve any jail time and was given 3 years of probation. Since then I went back to school, received a bachelor's degree,started my own business, and plan to go back to pursue a Master's degree.

I want to work in a youth care facility, specifically working with at-risk youth and provide counseling, mentoring, and outreach. However, if a facility is licensed by the state, live-scan is a requirement. I had the misdemeanor charge expunged, but I know that the charge will still be on record (which I had expunged). I actually had an interview for a facility and when asked about my criminal background, I was honest with that person. However, she could not hire me because of the record. She told me that I could apply for an exemption to work in the facility.

My question/concern is that from research on receiving an exemption, I would have to have the particular facility send a letter/request to the Licensing board before I can fill out the appropriate paperwork to get this exemption. Is it common for any facility to honor this request? How I interpret this is that this facility would have to support you and go out of their way so they can hire you. My frustration is that any place is going to hire someone else that has a clean background over someone like myself. So I am wondering if you have had

any experience with exemptions or clearances through the DOJ/LIvescan? Do you think it is possible for ex-offenders to get jobs in this field? I will jump through hoops and get what is needed to get hired but is it a lost cause and doing all of this for nothing?

I am sorry for the lengthy email. I've spent many months researching this subject. I really could not find much information in regards to other people's experience with this particular subject. It has been very discouraging. I would appreciate any insight you might have. Thank you for your time.


Sincerely,

G


Ex-offender may need help to get a job



Hello G,

 Ex-offender may need help to get a jobI guess it couldn't hurt to apply for the exemption and the facility definitely would have to put some added effort into it. I want everyone to understand that expungement and sealing of records does not erase them. They simply are hidden from the public. The charge and subsequent conviction will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies.

I know of ex-offenders and felons having similar jobs. The fact that you were informed about applying for exemption should give you hope if you really want this jobs. As I tell all ex-offenders and felons, they should apply for all jobs they believe they qualify for.

If this doesn't work out, you can always contact the United Way office in your area. They will be able to put you in contact with advocates and other organizations that provide services for ex-offenders and felons.

I hope this helps.

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Truth About Background Checks

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
Ex-offender may need help to get a job.


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record



  Ex-offender may need help to get a job.

Read More

Wednesday, January 2, 2019

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons
List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons

I get a lot of emails about getting a job with a criminal record.  I get quite a few from ex-offenders regarding the list of companies that hire ex-offenders and felons.  We have all seen the list.  It is posted on a number of websites.  I even have a variation of it on this blog here: 

Updated List of Companies That Hire Ex-offenders and Felons 

I have contacted each one of the companies on the list and none of them have official policies that exclude the hiring of ex-offenders.  My list is a little different because it includes companies that have hired students that I have worked with personally.

Many people that read this list are confused.  Just because an employer has hired an ex-offender in the past, does not mean it will hire every ex-offender or felon that applies for employment.  The nature of the conviction of the person applying will come into play.  For example, a person convicted of any type of theft or robbery will not be considered for any type of job where valuables are at risk.  A person with a drug conviction will not be considered for jobs in hospitals, clinics, nursing homes etc.  There maybe even local laws which prohibit those with drug related convictions to be employed anywhere alcohol is served.

Many types of jobs require licenses that people with certain types of convictions are ineligible for. 

I have also met people who have have applied for jobs with some of the employers on the list and come to the conclusion that the employer doesn't hire felons because the employer did not them.  Just by appearance, the person was a poor applicant who just didn't make a good impression or did not fit int what the employer feels a good employee looks like.

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons
Before you apply for any position, you have make sure you put yourself in the best position to be hired.  The first and most important is appearance.

Do you have suitable interview clothes? For men, a well fitting suit with a nice shirt and tie would be the absolute best thing to have. That may not be possible for someone just coming home but I suggest that men at least have dark dress slacks, a light colored shirt and a coordinated tie. You should also have a pair of shoes that you can put some polish on. Not boots, not sneakers…shoes! A good number of my students buy
List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons their interview clothing at thrift stores like Goodwill or the Salvation Army store. They find quality clothes at very low prices, clean and press them and they are ready to interview. Never mind how you get them, the right clothes will make the difference. You should also have a neat haircut and be clean shaven. If you wear a beard, it should be neat and trimmed. How do you look? Do you look like an ex-offender with a shirt and tie or do you look like a businessman? Do you look like you are going to a
List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons
business meeting? You should - an interview is a business meeting. You should always look like a professional who is there to make a business deal! Always dress like you have an interview even to fill out applications.  You will never get a second chance to make a first impression.

Women should wear a classic skirted or pant suit with a light colored blouse or a simple dress that does not come up above the knee.  Do not wear anything too tight or too skimpy.  Be sure to wear coordinated pumps that are neat and clean.  The pantyhose should match the skin with no pattern.

Hair should be neat and of natural color.  A short hairstyle is best, but tastefully done longer hair is fine.  Fingernails should be neatly trimmed with tasteful polish.  The make-up should be natural looking.  One set
List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felonsof earrings (no larger than a quarter) no facial piercings or tongue ornaments, one ring per hand and no more than one bracelet per wrist.  If you have visible tattoos, especially on the neck or face, should be covered by makeup.
  

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felonsDo you have a resume?  A resume will present your skills, past experience and other information in one neat package.  Everyone looking for a job should have a resume.  If you do not have a well written resume, you should do what you have to get one.

How are your interview skills.  Once again, you will have to leave an employer with a good impression of you, so brush up on your interviewing skills

This is a great list and a great opportunity for ex-offenders and felons to get hired for jobs.  Make the most of the opportunity!


Please Rate This Post at the Top!



List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons



Jobs for Felons The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)

,

Tips to help felons get jobs

Jobs for Felons: How does a Criminal Record Affect Employment?

List of Companies that hire ex-offenders and felons



companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons

Read More

Wednesday, December 19, 2018

Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs

Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs

 

Ex-offenders and Felons can get JobsHello, 

My name is Eric Mayo.  Welcome to my blog.  I have helping ex-offenders and felons get jobs for many years.  Many people with criminal records feel they have no chance at getting jobs. That is far from the truth. Though it may be a bit more challenging to ex-offenders and felons, it is possible to to compete for jobs. To do this, felons must construct a plan to neutralize the effects of having a criminal record. It is definitely going to be more challenging, but the challenges can be overcome by hard work, planning and creativity. I started this blog to offer ex-offenders and felons practical advice and other useful information that can help them get jobs

What I want everyone to understand that jobs are not going to come to you.  You are going to have to go and get them.  Getting a job is tough.  Getting a job with a criminal record is even tougher.  You are have to work harder, smarter and longer than the average job seeker because your record has put you in somewhat of a handicapped position.  No one is going to feel sorry for you.  The only thing that is going to work is hard work.

I will be updating this blog often so make it a point to stop by from time to time to see what questions have been asked and answered here.  If after a while a questions similar to your situation has not been asked, feel free to send me an email with your question.  I may not be able to answer your question right away, so look through the available responses.  Maybe you will find some information that will help you.

To get everyone started, I'm going to share one of my favorite videos.

 Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons:  Where felons can Find Jobs

 Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons:  Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record


Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs


 

Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs

Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Read More

Monday, December 10, 2018

Wife of felon wants to help him get a job

Wife of felon wants to help him get a job


Wife of felon wants to help him get a job
Hello,

My husband has been released from prison after ten years about 3 months ago. Since than time we're finding it very hard for him to find employment. I mean extremely hard and he has become very depressed. He has gone to target, walmart, meijers, home depot, best buy, Kroger's, McDonald's, kfc, you name it we have filled out applications. He has called them on several occasions to check back about employment. He has two violent felonies and has had many doors slammed in his face. He just feels like giving up. I don't want him to do anything drastic at this point. I really don't know how much more to help him. Is there any advice you can offer us? It would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Concerned Wife



Wife of felon wants to help him get a job



I'm sorry your husband is having so much trouble. Having two violent felonies makes getting a job difficult. It's time for some out-of-the-box thinking.

My suggestion is for him to contact his parole or probation officer. Often they know of employers who hire felons. They also have felons on their caseloads who have gotten jobs. perhaps the officer can point him in the direction of these employers.

Another strategy that often works is to have your husband contact the judge who sentenced him. Judges are influential people with many contacts. He can express to the judge how important getting a job is and his desire to stay on the right side of the law. He should ask the judge for any assistance he can offer. You will be surprised at how effective this will be.

I hope this helps.

Please Rate This Post at the Top!

 Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can felons get Jobs

 Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Wife of felon wants to help him get a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Wife of felon wants to help him get a job

Read More

Felon wants to join the military

Felon wants to join the military


 Can a Felon Join the Military
Hey my name is Dylan. I have recently gained interest in joining the army. I’m from Illinois and I was charged with a class 1 felony in November, 2016 when I was 17 years old and was charged as an adult. I’m 18 years old now. By law I’m suppose to serve prison time, however I was granted a strict probation sentence. I’m still going through the motions of court, but upon completion of probation the felonies will be expunged. I want to enlist and get things started as soon as possible! Please help me out! Let me know what I can do! Thank You!

Dylan



 Felon wants to join the military



Hello Dylan,

The military is often an option for ex-offenders looking for jobs.  Once your probation is finished, I suggest you speak to a recruiter. Even if your charge is expunged, it will still be visible to the military. It will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and any government agency.  The recruiter will be able to help you establish your eligibility. I don't know which branch of the military you are interested in but the Army has a record of being more lenient than the others.  I know of felons who have joined the military and turned service in careers.  You can learn a useful trade in the military and also gain military status that will give you an edge when applying for jobs after your service is completed.

If recruitment numbers are down, you will have a better chance.  The Army has been known to grant waivers to convicted felons who have finished their sentences.  Waivers are considers on a case by case basis so your particular offense will be considered.

I hope this helps.




Please Rate This Post at the Top!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Truth About Background Checks

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
Felon want to join the military

Felon want to join the military

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Felon wants to join the military

Read More

Monday, November 12, 2018

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job



Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job
Hello,

My name is Tim. I was reading the blogs on the web site. I have complete compassion in this matter as I am also a convicted felon. It's shameful just to say it aloud, but like the others I have accepted it and realized what I have done is wrong.  My convictions unfortunately were aimed mainly at my parents when I was younger do to an emotionally unstable home life. I have corrected my problems and own emotional bouts. I am a successful father of two beautiful little girls and engaged to the most wonderful woman on this planet. We are buying a house soon on her income....I feel less of a person not being able to provide for my family.

I was told last week by Kelly services after an interview that I had the job. It was the best news I heard since my lady said yes to that important question after we laid our baby girl down for the night. I went to work today, I loved it. I liked it so much I started to talking to the human resources person about retirement and shares in the biz. I received a phone call on the way home tonight which is what has sparked my efforts for finding an answer online. Kelly services was relaying a message that a background check had come back and they found a felony.

The conviction that was in question was a misdemeanor. I'm not even sure that will save me from what's ahead but I plan on taking immediate action in the morning. My hopes lie within the kind heart of the hr woman from the place I was employed. The conviction in '07 was not a felony, if there is any possible way to get that taken care of on a very bare income please let me know. Thank you for your time and have wonderful day.

Sincerely,

Tim


Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job



Hello Tim,

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job
Two things come to mind. First, if the conviction was on the application, It wouldn't be a question. As I suggest to all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, be totally honest when completing employment applications. It would make no sense to leave convictions off when applying, get hired and than lose the job when background checks are done at a later time.

If your only situation is that your misdemeanor is listed as a felony, one option is to have the prosecutor associated with your case to correct the situation. Often the prosecutor has the power to downgrade a felony to a misdemeanor.  If there was an error, you should have no problem getting this done.  If you have no success there, I suggest contacting your local legal aid office. There you may be able to get low-cost or even no-cost assistance correcting your situation. Often ex-offenders and felons looking for employment require some legal assistance and that is a good place to start.

I hope this helps

Jobs for felons: Expungement - A Way to Erase Your Criminal Record



Jobs for felons: Expungement basics


Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Expungement | Pre-trial Intervention

Read More

Wednesday, September 5, 2018

Employers are slowly turning to ex-offenders to fill open jobs in a worker-hungry economy

In a tight labor market, employers are willing to expand talent pool. 

By  Star Tribune
Employers are slowly turning to ex-offenders to fill open jobs in a worker-hungry economy
Quality Ingredients CEO Isabelle Day and plant manager
Bob Banken said
six of their 60 employees are former inmates.
CEO Isabelle Day of Quality Ingredients of Burnsville was having difficulty filling jobs last year when she read a Star Tribune column about hiring former inmates.

Starting pay is $15 an hour and can reach $40,000 a year, and employees get annual bonuses, health care and a retirement plan.

Day and her plant manager work through Twin Cities Rise, the nonprofit trainer that puts ex-inmates and other low-income folks through a rigorous curriculum of personal empowerment, training and soft-skill development before placing them in internships, at temp agencies or in full-time jobs.

“These are great people who have made mistakes,” Day said. “In many cases, these people are stronger than somebody walking off the street to apply. The work is tough. We see a sincerity and great communication skills. They tend to be respectful, thoughtful and mature.”

As the job market gets tighter, employers are slowly turning to nonprofits such as Rise, Emerge, Building Better Futures, Summit Academy, Genesys Works, Goodwill Easter Seals and others that help former felons build skills and land decent jobs.

“We are safer when these guys have jobs and housing,” said CEO Dan Pfarr of 180 Degrees. “We are their step from prison to the civilian world.”

The Minneapolis nonprofit serves men on parole as they move from prison to community with short-term housing and counseling. It links them to training and organizations connected to employers. It has to happen quickly. Most parolees get only 60 to 90 days to get housing and find a job, with expenses covered by the Minnesota Department of Corrections.

The transition from prison to work, and civilian society, is not easy, particularly if you have been locked up 10 or 15 years and never operated a cellphone or computer. It also takes the right mind-set and a willingness to beat the odds.

Close to 60 percent of Minnesota inmates are back in prison within two years.

Minnesota has a lower-than-average incarceration rate but one of the highest rates of people on probation, which can end up being a “back door” to prison re-entry.

More than half of those returning to prison are on parole violations, according to the Minnesota Department of Commerce. Pfarr and Richard Coffey, 180 Degrees program director, said the violations often are for noncriminal acts, such as being late or taking a different route than prescribed to training or jobs.

“These guys, and we deal with about 300 a year, get a case manager and we work with them on a plan. Some of them have some training. I’m impressed with many of them. Life for them can be daunting,” Pfarr said.

Low jobless rate’s upside

The good news is that the low unemployment rate is prompting employers to warm to hiring former inmates.

Tony Bulmer, a former prisoner, has moved up over six months from a laborer position to a $20 supervisory position at Gregory Foods in Eagan. He’s also moving from a 180 Degrees residence to his own room in September.

“I’m taking this opportunity to the fullest,” said Bulmer, 31, also a trained diesel mechanic.

Bulmer grew up working in a family-owned bakery and likes machinery, which has helped in his new role.

“If I can see how it works, I can figure out how to do it,” he said.

A groundbreaking report last year by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) provides a road map into the “successes of corporate policies giving formerly incarcerated Americans a fair chance at re-entry.”

It’s been embraced by large employers including Google, Total Wine, the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundation, Koch Industries, Walmart and other companies.

Locally, Quality Ingredients, Target, Bremer Bank and numerous small businesses are on board.

And Rise and its national partner, Root & Rebound, which advocates for former inmates, have received great response from local employers for their “Minnesota Employers’ Fair Chance Hiring Guide.”

The guide takes employers through legal compliance and risk minimization, background checks, the rewards of hiring a second-chance worker, best practices for “onboarding” former inmates and strategies for helping them integrate into the workforce.

As the Minnesota prison system and number of prisoners and parolees generally ballooned over the last 30 years, in part because of mandatory sentences for drug and other nonviolent offenses, the state has spent disproportionately less on education, training and employment services.

Louis King, CEO of Summit Academy, which works with low-income people to earn high school-equivalency degrees, and train for entry-level posts in building trades, IT and health care, has said the best social-welfare program is gaining skills, and showing up for a living-wage job.CEO Isabelle Day of Quality Ingredients of Burnsville was having difficulty filling jobs last year when she read a Star Tribune column about hiring former inmates.

“Turnover was high and we were using [costly] temporary agencies for labor,” she recalled.

Today, six of the 60 factory workers on the floor of Quality Ingredients are ex-offenders.

Starting pay is $15 an hour and can reach $40,000 a year, and employees get annual bonuses, health care and a retirement plan.

Day and her plant manager work through Twin Cities Rise, the nonprofit trainer that puts ex-inmates and other low-income folks through a rigorous curriculum of personal empowerment, training and soft-skill development before placing them in internships, at temp agencies or in full-time jobs.

“These are great people who have made mistakes,” Day said. “In many cases, these people are stronger than somebody walking off the street to apply. The work is tough. We see a sincerity and great communication skills. They tend to be respectful, thoughtful and mature.”

As the job market gets tighter, employers are slowly turning to nonprofits such as Rise, Emerge, Building Better Futures, Summit Academy, Genesys Works, Goodwill Easter Seals and others that help former felons build skills and land decent jobs.

“We are safer when these guys have jobs and housing,” said CEO Dan Pfarr of 180 Degrees. “We are their step from prison to the civilian world.”

The Minneapolis nonprofit serves men on parole as they move from prison to community with short-term housing and counseling. It links them to training and organizations connected to employers. It has to happen quickly. Most parolees get only 60 to 90 days to get housing and find a job, with expenses covered by the Minnesota Department of Corrections.

The transition from prison to work, and civilian society, is not easy, particularly if you have been locked up 10 or 15 years and never operated a cellphone or computer. It also takes the right mind-set and a willingness to beat the odds.

Close to 60 percent of Minnesota inmates are back in prison within two years.

Minnesota has a lower-than-average incarceration rate but one of the highest rates of people on probation, which can end up being a “back door” to prison re-entry.

More than half of those returning to prison are on parole violations, according to the Minnesota Department of Commerce. Pfarr and Richard Coffey, 180 Degrees program director, said the violations often are for noncriminal acts, such as being late or taking a different route than prescribed to training or jobs.

“These guys, and we deal with about 300 a year, get a case manager and we work with them on a plan. Some of them have some training. I’m impressed with many of them. Life for them can be daunting,” Pfarr said.

Low jobless rate’s upside

The good news is that the low unemployment rate is prompting employers to warm to hiring former inmates.

Tony Bulmer, a former prisoner, has moved up over six months from a laborer position to a $20 supervisory position at Gregory Foods in Eagan. He’s also moving from a 180 Degrees residence to his own room in September.

“I’m taking this opportunity to the fullest,” said Bulmer, 31, also a trained diesel mechanic.

Bulmer grew up working in a family-owned bakery and likes machinery, which has helped in his new role.

“If I can see how it works, I can figure out how to do it,” he said.

A groundbreaking report last year by the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) provides a road map into the “successes of corporate policies giving formerly incarcerated Americans a fair chance at re-entry.”

It’s been embraced by large employers including Google, Total Wine, the Ford Foundation, the Open Society Foundation, Koch Industries, Walmart and other companies.

Locally, Quality Ingredients, Target, Bremer Bank and numerous small businesses are on board.

And Rise and its national partner, Root & Rebound, which advocates for former inmates, have received great response from local employers for their “Minnesota Employers’ Fair Chance Hiring Guide.”

The guide takes employers through legal compliance and risk minimization, background checks, the rewards of hiring a second-chance worker, best practices for “onboarding” former inmates and strategies for helping them integrate into the workforce.

As the Minnesota prison system and number of prisoners and parolees generally ballooned over the last 30 years, in part because of mandatory sentences for drug and other nonviolent offenses, the state has spent disproportionately less on education, training and employment services.

Louis King, CEO of Summit Academy, which works with low-income people to earn high school-equivalency degrees, and train for entry-level posts in building trades, IT and health care, has said the best social-welfare program is gaining skills, and showing up for a living-wage job.


Employers are slowly turning to ex-offenders to fill open jobs in a worker-hungry economy


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons | felon friendly


Eric Mayo

Read More