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Showing posts with label jobs for ex-offenders. Show all posts
Showing posts with label jobs for ex-offenders. Show all posts

Thursday, October 17, 2019

Goodwill industries providing hope and help to convicted felons


Posted: Mon 11:31 PM, Oct 14, 2019  | Updated: Mon 11:40 PM, Oct 14, 2019

Toledo, OHIO (WTVG) - Goodwill Industries works to convicted felons get back into the workforce. The non-profit recently received a $1 million grant from the Department of Justice for a program aimed at providing training and treatment behind bars.
The program is called Stay the Course. 
The idea is to have case workers and other navigators inside county and regional jails and state prisons,
Goodwill industries providing hope and help to convicted felons
connecting with convicted felons and offering them help before release.
Senator Rob Portman helped secure funding through the Second Chance Act. Since 2009 the legislation has helped fund $39 million in grant money for Ohio re-entry programs.
Amanda Huckleberry was convicted of felony theft three years ago, since then she has been working to find permanent housing, a job and transportation with the help of Goodwill.
She attributes her success of staying away from the streets to her caseworker, Samantha. Huckleberry says when she was released, after serving 7 months in prison, she had no job, no house and no car.
"I went from having everything to nothing," says Huckleberry.
Today, Senator Rob Portman heard some of the success stories linked to the local program and also address areas where there are gaps.
For Huckleberry, while she is receiving job training, housing and transportation continue to be an issue. Portman says he wants to introduce the Jobs Act again to Congress as another way to guarantee employment after incarceration, potentially making securing a home and a vehicle easier for those with nothing.
Portman says he wants federal Pell Grants to not only cover the cost of colleges and universities but skilled trade training jobs and certification programs. He believes this will help those convicted of a crime get back into the workforce quickly and be able to earn a living wage for positions that are in dire need of qualified workers.

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Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

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Monday, September 30, 2019

Expungement could help felons get Jobs

 Expungement could help felons get Jobs

Expungement could help felons get Jobs


Hello Sir:

I was convicted of felony in 2009 for possession and delivery of narcotics, I served 26 months and everything has been well for me until 2019. I have been having a hard time getting a job in my field of study, which is computer science. I am enclosing my resume so that you can take a look at all of the places I have worked, but can't seem to find work because of the intense background checks now. ONE Conviction 21 Years ago man it's hard. 

Please Advise. 

Thank you.



 Expungement could help felons get Jobs




Hello Jason,

Looking at your background, your inability to find work may be due to other factors. Some convictions are more difficult to work with than others.  Take a look at the first video below.  It will give you an idea of what I mean.  

For many ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, expungement may help. Expungement will not erase your conviction but it may keep it off of the average background check. You can find more information here:

http://courts.michigan.gov/scao/selfhelp/intro/criminal/setaside_help.htm


I would not attempt this alone. You may be able to get low-cost or even low-cost assistance at your local legal aid office.


I hope this helps




Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2019)





Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Expungement could help felons get Jobs

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Friday, September 20, 2019

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record


Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?


Hello,

I have been trying to get a job with an insurance company or large law firms and no one is calling me back. I assume it is because I was arrested in 2002 and plead out to probation. I am not a convicted felon, but that is still on my record. Also, I have an arrest for battery on my record, but the case got thrown out. Can you really help? I received an email from Allstate that they want to set up an interview with me next week. Will this mess me up once they look up my background?


Mattie

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?


Hello Mattie,

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?Let's start at the beginning.  You state that you plead to probation, which means that you were convicted.  I don't know what your conviction was for, but if you were convicted of any type of theft, fraud or robbery, some jobs may not be available to you. 

In case of any other arrests, employers are more concerned with convictions rather that arrests.  That is why the question on applications typically begin with. "Have you been convicted of a crime..."  I encourage all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs to get a copy of their criminal records so that they can answer this question honestly and accurately.  The best place to get this is from your probation officer.  I'm sure he/she can get a copy for you.

When your interview comes, as I advise everyone with a criminal record, answer every question honestly, but never volunteer information.  If the question does come up on the interview like this, "I'm glad you are asking this question, because I want you to feel comfortable hiring me....."  Then briefly explain the circumstance surrounding the infraction.  Spend more time talking about the steps you have taken to overcome that situation.

Don't assume that your legal issues are the reason you are getting few call backs.  Continue to apply for every job you qualify for for.  Don't assume that because you have a record, you won't be considered.

I would also try to find out if expungement in your state.  Expungement essentially means that your criminal record would be hidden from public view.  Once that is done, you may claim not to have a record when responding to the "Have you ever been convicted....." question.  Expungement is a legal process that you should not try alone.  You should contact your local legal aid office to see if your state offers the opportunity for expungement.  You may also qualify for free legal services.



Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record

Jobs for Felons:  How Expungement can help Felons get Jobs



Jobs for Felons: Know your Rights Regarding Background Checks


Jobs for Felons: How to Make a Professional Resume



Jobs for Felons: How to get the Job you Want



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?

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Tuesday, August 6, 2019

Felon Mom having a Rough Job Search

 Felon Mom having a Rough Job Search



Felon Mom having a Rough Job SearchI was looking through the newspaper trying to find something, anything  to support my family. Fifteen years ago I was convicted of a felony. I was twenty years old never been in trouble before and have never been in trouble since then. I didn't spend time in jail but I did do five years probation and was discharged. Now here I am 35 years old no job, no future and a family that is struggling because I can't help. I can’t even get hired at fast food places. I had a great job working for the State through a temporary agency but it was great. I was about to be hired and they did a background check on me. The agency knew about my record and still hired me, but after my background came back I was fired on the spot. Forget that I had been there for 2 years everyday and worked very hard for them. Companies have the chance to hire good workers but they pass us by everyday. Every one makes mistakes, but there are many like me who want to work, and support their families but can't get a break anywhere. My husband works every day and he works very hard to take care of us. I am very proud of him, but he will never understand how I feel. I have been out oft work for over a year now and I am getting depressed. There are things I want for my family and myself but getting a job is the first step. My husband works but his paycheck is not enough to pay all of our bills. We ave a small son and we feel bad because there isn't money for birthday or Christmas gifts or anything that make kids happy.  I had all of those things  I have never begged for a hand out, all I want is a little break so my family won't be so stressed. The stress alone is killing my marriage! My family does not deserve to live like this all because of something I did in my past.  My family deserves better than this.  

The world looks at us like once a criminal always a criminal and that's not always the case.  It makes drives me crazy when I see people living off the government.  You got women that keep having babies just to collect more welfare and free government housing.  I have been on the waiting list for for housing for ten years and I have heard nothing!  I see illegal immigrants coming over here that open restaurants, hotels, stores and then you got the ones that come over here and collect welfare for years. Where is the justice when people who were born here can't get anything? My family is forced to live in run down apartments in because we can not afford anything better. We are forced to deal with awful landlords that don’t fix anything but still want their rent  or throw you out.

My hopes of opening up my own business are slowly fading away.  My husband tries to encourage me not to give up but after the year we have had I know it will never happen for me and I promise if it does I won't keep them from a job because of something they did in the past. People can change and I am living proof! I don’t want to think that this is the life God has in store for me but I am starting to wonder, am I going to live the rest of my life like this?


This is Haley


Felon Mom having a Rough Job Search 

 

Hello Haley,

Felon Mom having a Rough Job SearchI'm sorry you are having so much trouble in your job search. I also see that the stress is taking it's toll on you.  Because of this, finding a job may not be the only situation you are dealing with.  My suggestion is to
contact your local Salvation Army.  The Salvation Army could put you in touch with some social services that could lend some immediate help to your family.
Felon Mom having a Rough Job Search
Next you  should contact your local United Way office.  The United Way provides support for a number of agencies.  Perhaps they would
have knowledge of advocacy groups that specialize in assisting felons or women. They could help you with some things until you can find work.

You mentioned that you worked for a temp service for two years.  Perhaps that route could help you again.  You can also try your local One-stop Career Center.  You will find a variety of free services that can help you get a job.  You can also find lists of open jobs in your area.  You may be eligible for job search related benefits such as child care and transportation passes.

You can find your local One-stop here:

http://www.serviclocator.org

There are more companies willing to give qualified people with criminal records opportunities to get hired.  Ex-offenders and felons will find that having a criminal record will not automatically disqualify them from jobs.  Click the image below get a huge list of companies that hire felons.


Felon Mom having a Rough Job Search



I hope this helps.




Jobs for Felons: Getting a Job with a Criminal Record




Jobs for Felons: How to Make a Job Search Plan



Jobs for Felons: #1 Secret of Successful Female Career Changers





Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Felon Mom having a Rough Job Search

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Tuesday, July 23, 2019

Can felons go to college and get jobs?

Can felons go to college and get jobs

Hello,

I came across your website and have gotten some helpful feedback. However, in my situation I am a 21 year old female convicted of felony possession and attempted transportation of marijuana for sale. I'm currently on supervised probation. Expungement is not an early option for at least another 6 months to a year. And even though I'm a first time offender, I think my record is now showing up and I've been denied jobs for the first time in my life. I had to drop out of college because I couldn't afford it just weeks after I caught my case back in 2014 and then convicted and served time in 2015. I was attending a top 100 four-year university majoring in chemical engineering with the pre-med option. I want to change my major to nursing and consider med school later. What are my options as far as employment for the next several months and what are your thoughts on my options for school and funding thereafter?

Can felons go to college and get jobs?


Hello,

Can felons go to college and get jobs?
Even though expungement may not be an option, you may be able to get a downgrade of your charge. That may make it easier to work with. Speak to an attorney in your local legal aid office to see if this is an option in your state. Even with expungement,  your conviction will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies. The only issue may be, if the jobs you want require any certification or licensing.  As I encourage all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, apply for every job you feel you qualify for.

One thing I teach my students looking for professional jobs, is to apply by sending their resumes with well written cover. letters.  Often when they apply this way, the question of criminal records never comes up.  If it does, they should be prepared to talk about their convictions in a positive way.

Your local One-stop career center may help you get a job. you can find the center nearest to you at this link:

www.servicelocator.org

Can felons go to college and get jobs?In reference to going to college, I have numerous students who have gone on to college careers. There are some points of consideration. Some jobs may require certification or licensing. Be sure your conviction will not forbid you from being certified or licensed in your state. Also regarding getting federal financial aid for college, I know of felons and ex-offenders who were able to get grants and loans for education and later on jobs. Speak to someone in the financial aid office of the school you wish to attend. They will help you get the necessary forms. Unfortunately not everybody convicted of a felony is eligible. Certain drug convictions require that you complete an accepted drug rehabilitation program in order to be eligible for federal financial aid. Just something to consider.

Doors are opening for ex-offenders and felons not only for jobs but access to higher education.  If you are not only looking for employment, but looking for a college education. Take a look at this article:


Jobs for Felons: Government Help For Felons Looking for Jobs
I hope this helps.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and felons: Sending Resumes and Cover Letters


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Truth About Background Checks

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
Can felons go to college and get jobs?


Can felons go to college and get jobs?


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | College for felons | Second Chance Jobs

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Wednesday, July 10, 2019

Will Pre-trial diversion hurt my job search?

Will Pre-trial diversion hurt my job search?


Will Pre-trial diversion hurt my job search
Good Morning:

I received a misdemeanor public intoxication and felony obstruction of an officer over 2 and a half years ago. I am on my states pre-trial diversion program. I know this is going to show up on a criminal background check until I complete the program next February. Will a company not hire me even though I have never been convicted and just charged? My case is open until I complete the pre-trial program.


Thanks for your help.

Regards,


J

Will Pre-trial diversion hurt my job search?




Hello J,

 Will Pre-trial diversion hurt my job search?Generally speaking, Pre-trial Diversion is usually used for first time offenders of lesser crimes. There are certain terms (usually probation and a fine) attached to pre-trial diversion that must be met. Once the terms are met, the charges are then dropped.

In most cases, employers only ask about convictions and not charges. Always pay attention to the wording on applications.  If the application asks for charges, list your charges.  If it asks for convictions, only list convictions.  Since the charges will be dropped, there is no conviction.  In my professional opinion, this will be a non-issue.  I wouldn't worry too much about it.

If it still bothers you, find out if expungement is an option in your state.  Expungement is a legal process that will hide your charges from public view.  To get more information, I suggest you contact your local legal aid office to see if this is an option for you.  If so, they may offer assistance getting it done.

I hope this helps.



Search for open jobs in your area


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Employment Background Checks: Know Your Rights

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: The Truth About Background Checks

Jobs for ex-offenders and Felons: Expungement of Criminal Records

 
Will Pre-trial diversion hurt my job search?



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Pre-trial Intervention | Pre-trial Diversion

Will Pre-trial diversion hurt my job search?

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Sunday, June 16, 2019

Jobs for Felons: Companies Pledge Second Chance Opportunities

 Jobs for Felons: Companies Pledge Second Chance Opportunities



The most overlooked and discriminated against segment of the American population is getting a well need boost.  More and more people are looking for ways to help ex-offenders and felons better re-integrate into society.  The closer we look at this, we find that the better we are able to help previously incarcerated individuals, the better off we all will be.


We will look at:


  • Incarceration in America
  • Fair Chance in Employment
  • Fair Chance in Education



Jobs for Felons: Companies Pledge Second Chance Opportunities


Incarceration in America


The United States has the highest incarceration rate in the entire world. The International Centre for Prison Studies estimates that 724 out of every 100,000 American is in prison or jail.

CountryPrison populationPopulation per 100,000Jail occupancy level %Un-sentenced prisoners %Women prisoners %
US2,193,798737107.621.28.9
CHINA1,548,498118N/AN/A4.6
RUSSIA874,16161579.516.96.8
BRAZIL371,482193150.933.15.4
INDIA332,1123013970.13.7
MEXICO214,450196133.943.25
UKRAINE162,602350101.319.56.1
SOUTH AFRICA158,501334138.627.52.1
POLAND89,546235124.416.83
ENGLAND/WALES80,002148112.716.45.5
JAPAN79,05262105.914.75.9
KENYA47,036130284.345.642
TURKEY65,4589177.447.73.3
NIGERIA40,44430101.564.31.9
AUSTRALIA25,790125105.921.67.1
SCOTLAND6,872134107.5214.4
N IRELAND1,3757991.537.42.2
SOURCE: International Centre for Prison Studies

There are over 600,000 people released from American jails and prisons every year.  There are more than 70 million people in this country with some type of criminal record.  Many want desperately to put their pasts behind them but their records continue to haunt them and ruin their chances to get jobs.  The best and most important factor in the successful transition to society is that they find gainful employment.  For most, this is not easy.  In fact, some find it next to impossible.  Without employment, many with criminal records will find themselves once again on the wrong side of the law, while others will will become burdens on the economy.

In the past, it was believed that ex-offenders and felons being shutout of employment was part of their sentences.  It was almost guaranteed that people with criminal records would be routinely discriminated against when it came to employment and educational opportunities.

It cost about $40,000 to keep a person incarcerated.  With a job, instead of going back to prison or becoming a drain on social services resources, previously incarcerated people could become taxpaying, law abiding citizens.  This a win for society, the economy, families and individuals.  With unemployment rates being the lowest in decades, employers are in need of qualified applicants to fill open positions.  The Fair Chance initiative will be great for companies too.


Jobs for Felons: Companies Pledge Second Chance Opportunities



Fair Chance in Employment


One of the most progressive initiatives of Barack Obama's administration was called the Fair Chance Pledge.  The President called on businesses and educational institutions to help make this country stronger by pledging to remove barriers to employment and education for people with criminal records.


Sen. Booker introduces the Fair Chance Act



Though President Obama is no longer in office, many more companies and educational institutions have accepted the challenge to help remove the barriers that having a criminal record has placed in front of so many people.  Four years ago, only 12 or so companies signed the pledge.  The list now numbers in the hundreds.  Large, mid-sized and small businesses all over the country have signed the pledge to help remove barriers to employment that ex-offenders and felons face.

These companies have pledged to:

Ban the Box

There are no questions on initial employment applications regarding criminal history.  This allows employers to establish potential employees' qualifications.  Background checks will only be done if the candidate is being seriously considered for employment.  Of course the nature of the applicant's conviction will be taken into account.

Fair Chance Job Fairs

These companies advertise that their job fairs offer fair chance opportunities

Train Human Resources Staff on Fair Chance Practices

Managers and human resources staff will be trained to make fair hiring decisions as they relate to people with criminal records.  They will keep accurate counts of those hired

Fair and Accurate Background Checks

They will use background check providers who provide current and accurate information.

Fair Chance Internships and Training

People with criminal records will have equal access to internships and training opportunities

The next step would to be to include Fair Chance for Occupational Licensing.  Currently many trades that require licensing or certification are closed to ex-offenders and felons.  Lawmakers and community action groups are pushing to make it easier for previously incarcerated people to obtain licenses.  This would make it easier for people with criminal records to have job opportunities in healthcare, trade unions and other occupations

The fair chance initiative can give both applicants and hiring companies a valuable opportunity. Employers will be able to meet qualified candidates they might otherwise have overlooked, and previously incarcerated people get a shot at the second chance they need to help turn their lives around.



Jobs for Felons: Companies Pledge Second Chance Opportunities



Fair Chance In Education


An estimated 70 million Americans have had contact with the criminal justice system.  Statistics illustrate that non-whites are incarcerated at higher rates and face stiffer penalties than whites.  This is attributed to racial profiling by police, limited access to proper legal defense and other factors.  This disparity has a negative effect on families, communities and our society. 



Beyond the Box



There is an increasing understanding that education plays a huge part in successful transition from prison to the greater society.  Research shows employment and or education reduces the likely hood that individuals will re-offend by over 40 percent.  It makes sense that the best way to ensure that formerly incarcerated people do not go back to prison is to remove the barriers to not only employment, but to education.  This means that institutions of higher learning should have admissions practices that do not exclude those with criminal records.  Part of these practices is not using one's legal past as criteria for admission.  Also criminal records should not be used to determine eligibility for federal financial aid.



Educational institutions understand the value of classroom diversity and creating an atmosphere of inclusion on their campuses.  They understand that educational opportunities translate into employment opportunities which in turn means safer, more prosperous communities. There advantages to the schools too.  Schools that pledge fair admissions practices are eligible for grands and other federal funding for programs that help those with disabilities.  There are also correctional facilities that partnering with colleges to provide degree programs and vocational training that will translate into greater employment opportunities upon release.


You can get a list of companies and schools who have taken the Fair Chance Pledge as well as other companies that hire ex-offenders and felons   Click Here


 Jobs for Felons: Companies Pledge Second Chance Opportunities



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Second Chance Jobs | Fair Chance Pledge


Jobs for Felons: Companies Pledge Second Chance Opportunities


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Monday, June 3, 2019

Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life

Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life



Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life
I work with people with criminal records who want to get jobs and turn their lives around.  I tell them that there are three things they must change to put their pasts behind them.  The have to change the places they go, change the things they do and most importantly change the people they spend time with.

No matter how hard you work to get your life in order, certain types of people will drain energy from you and in the end will ruin all of your efforts.  If you want to give yourself the best opportunity for success, you must remove these types of people from your life:


1. Haters

These people are never happy for anyone - including YOU!  They never encourage anyone or happy about anyone else's success.  They may be your friend, but they will not be happy if you are successful.  In fact they will probably have something negative to say or devalue whatever you accomplish.

2.  Manipulators

Manipulators are very sneaky.  They pretend to be friends.  They may know a lot about you and use what they know to get you to do what they want.

3.  Unreliable People

These people never show up on time, never do what they say they will do and know matter how many favors you have done for them, always have an excuse when you need a favor from them.

4.  People who love to Argue

These people will argue with anyone, anywhere, about anything.  They don't even have to know what they are talking about, they will argue.  It you say something is up, they will say its down.  These people will drain your energy and bring you down every time.

5.  Gossips

These people talk about other people all of time.  They can't help themselves.  They will even try to involve you in their gossiping.   Because they can't help themselves, they will also talk about you, when you aren't around.


6. Time Wasters

These people usually have no goals and very little going for them so they have no sense of time.  Because they have no sense of time, they have no problem with wasting yours.  They may try to have you join them playing video games or talking about thing that really have no value.  When you look up, you have wasted valuable time that you could have devoted to doing something positive.

7. Drama Queens and Kings

These people always bring drama wherever they go.  They always have some type of negativity going on at all times.  They do not get along with others and have often start the nonsense.  Be careful you might one day become part of the drama.

8.  Naysayers

These are people who are constantly tell you what cannot be done.  They will always tell you why you shouldn't do something rather than the good things that could happen.  If you let them, they will attempt to crush your dreams and goals.

9. Victims

These people constantly talk about what life has done to them or how someone has done them wrong.  They never talk about what they are doing to make the situation better.  They just complain and wallow in self-pity.

10. Dishonest People

These are the people who lie, cheat and steal on a regular basis.  Dishonest people always will have trouble because they are not to be trusted.  Who wants to be around people that cannot trust?


Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life



If you are trying to build a new life for yourself, eliminate these people.  The more time you spend with them, their habits and attitude will slowly rub off on you.

You deserve to have positive, supportive and loving people in your life. Getting rid of some people is addition by subtraction.  In fact, life is too short to spend time with people who do not want you to succeed or help you to be better.  Not everyone in your life is meant to stay there.


companies that hire felons



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

Jobs for Felons - 10 Types Of People To Get Out Of Your Life

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Tuesday, May 28, 2019

Felons can get a Fresh Start in the Military

Felons can get a Fresh Start in the Military
If you are a convicted felon between the ages of 17 and 35 the military may be the perfect opportunity to put your past behind you.

There are many benefits to a career in the military:








Pay and benefits

An enlisted person's salary starts at around $20,000 a year plus full benefits, not including monthly allowances of up to $1,500 depending on where he or she is stationed.

There are enlistment and re-enlistment bonuses can be over $20,000.  If you find that the military is a good career, you can get a full pension after serving 20 years or more.  You will still be a young man when you retire.  You can get a job or start a new career while collecting a full military pension.


Full medical coverage for you and your family.

When you join the military, you are immediately eligible for full health care benefits for yourself and your immediate family members and if you stay through until retirement, you and your family can take these benefits with you when you leave the military. These health benefits also apply to spouses and children.


Skills and training

The military is a great place to get training in basically any field.  You may also qualify for college or vocational training that can translate into a career after you leave the service


Education opportunities after you leave the military

The GI Bill pays veterans who served at least 36 months a monthly living allowance and full tuition to pay for college after they leave the military. Depending on how long the service member commits, this benefit can be used by spouses and children of veterans.


You can buy a home with no money down

By serving in the military, you will qualify for loans to purchase a home with no money down.  This benefit will be available to you even after you leave active service


No Unemployment

There is no unemployment in the military.  While other Americans struggle with unemployment, rising cost of living and other economic difficulties, the military provides employment and benefits for all who are eligible to serve.


The military will ask about any records of arrest, charges, juvenile court adjudications, traffic violations, probation periods, dismissed or pending charges or convictions, including those which have been expunged or sealed.  All government agencies including the armed services have access to all records.

Having a criminal record will not automatically disqualify you from joining the military.  An applicant with a criminal record may obtain a something called a “Moral Waiver." You can find more about Moral Waivers and criminal records from a military recruiter.

In the past, the Army has been the most lenient branch of the military and have a better record of granting Moral Waivers.


Law Violations (Trouble) Prior to Military Service




Felons can get a Fresh Start in the Military




Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record |  Felons in the Military

Felons can get a Fresh Start in the Military


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Thursday, April 25, 2019

Companies that Hire Ex-Offenders Can Get a Tax Credit, But Very Few Actually Claim It


Companies that Hire Ex-Offenders Can Get a Tax Credit, But Very Few Actually Claim It
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April has been recognized as “Second Chance Month” since 2017 as part of a bipartisan effort to push criminal justice reform. This year, President Trump has announced that he wants to cut unemployment among ex-offenders—currently around 27%, according to the Prison Policy Initiative—to single digits within five years. The most efficient way to do that is to modify the Work Opportunity Tax Credit.

A job provides needed income and adds structure to a person’s day; it’s no surprise that studies have shown employment can reduce the chance of re-offending by about 20%. Jobs for ex-offenders benefit everyone in a community.

That’s one reason ex-offenders are included in the class of applicants employers are encouraged to consider by an incentive known as Work Opportunity Tax Credits. The Work Opportunity Tax Credit is a provision of the Internal Revenue Code that authorizes a tax credit for companies that hire from certain populations, like veterans, recipients of certain entitlement programs, and people with felony records. Employers submit eligible new hires to claim a tax credit equal to a percentage of an employee’s wages.

More than job training or education, the WOTC holds promise for people leaving prison whose applications may not be as competitive as others. It also encourages higher wages since the tax credit is a proportion of what employees are paid.

In its current form, the WOTC isn’t as effective as it can be. The law applies only to those who are hired within one year of the date of their conviction or release from prison, whichever is later. In that respect, it may limit eligibility only to first-time users of the program; no job applicant can be certified twice if they need another job after that first year.

But as many as 45% of released prisoners don’t have a job in that first year of release. According to a study completed by the Brookings Institution last year, only 55% of released prisoners have any earnings at all during the first year they’re home. Very often, by the time they land a job, their eligibility for the WOTC is gone.

This might explain why the WOTC appears to suffer from underutilization. For instance, Oklahoma, the nation’s leading incarcerator, certified only 1,465 people in fiscal 2018 in the “ex-felon” category. New York, a state with approximately 47,100 inmates and 36,410 parolees, certified only 1,534 people for the WOTC. In 2014, an average of 41,866 people were on parole in California, yet only 527 eligible felons were certified to give their employers the tax credit.

The Labor Department reports that, for fiscal 2018, only 85,796 people with criminal records were certified as eligible employees—and this among a sea of an estimated 626,000 people who leave custody every year.

While it’s possible that 500,000 of those released people are ineligible because they’re beyond the one-year cutoff for the WOTC, any underutilization may stem from the inherent conflict between two policies that have same overarching goal: to help disadvantaged individuals secure employment.

Employers aren’t allowed to know of an applicant’s criminal record and eligibility under “Ban the Box” statutes—laws that remove felony conviction checkboxes from job applications.

Awareness of the WOTC benefit needs to grow and may very well do so on its own if aspiring hires can disclose their eligibility; but they won’t disclose if they’re prohibited from doing so. Ban the Box advocates have been so busy hiding people’s records to remove a disadvantage in hiring that they forego leveraging an advantage. We don’t know how many people who weren’t hired because of the eventual disclosure of their criminal record would have been offered a job if the company knew of the potential tax benefit.

There is a way to protect people’s understandable desire to both hide their record and also signal to employers that hiring them can bring a tax benefit. It involves not banning the box but revising it; a box asking of an applicant is a member of the groups covered by the WOTC would hide a criminal record while also informing businesses of the tax credit if hired.

It true that the stigma of criminal conviction prevents many people from being hired. It’s unclear whether the WOTC is enough to overcome preconceived ideas about released prisoners. The little evidence we have on this, a survey of companies in Connecticut by a small nonprofit, the Malta Justice Initiative, says employers are likely to respond to expanded tax incentives. 73% of respondents indicated a tax credit would motivate hiring managers; subsidies would entice 76% of them.

The Work Opportunity Tax Credit is authorized through the end of 2019 through the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes Act. Its reauthorization process will now involve criminal justice reform insider Senator Chuck Grassley who is the new Chair of the Senate Finance Committee and Vice-Chair of the Joint Committee on Taxation. Grassley’s dedication to reforming the reentry process and his new positions prime him to optimize the tax code to help meet the president’s employment goal.

Amending the WOTC to expand eligibility beyond one year would likely go a long way in helping released prisoners secure employment as well as provide a boon to businesses.

Chandra Bozelko is the Vice President of the National Society of Newspaper Columnists and writes the Webby award-winning blog Prison Diaries.


Introduction to the Work Opportunity Tax Credit




Companies that Hire Ex-Offenders Can Get a Tax Credit, But Very Few Actually Claim It

Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Companies that Hire Ex-Offenders Can Get a Tax Credit, But Very Few Actually Claim It


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