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Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Felons must be honest when applying for jobs

Felons must be honest when applying for jobs

 

 Be Honest
Hello,

I'm from Texas. I have a Felony/Theft charge on my background from 2008 and been on a 5yr probation about 3 years now. After about 3 weeks of job search, this past week I was hired on the spot as a sales associate at Academy. Then today, I was let go because of the felony charge, which i lied about on the application. Should I try talking to the manager and explain my situation? I know, i should just be upfront and put it down on the application, but not sure how to word it properly. What are some things to put on applications, when asked about criminal history? My degree is in Teaching and so have not tried those type of jobs. I also, have experience in, retail, food service, office. If you have other suggestions, please feel free to, share them. I'm glad I found your website. It helps having someone to share this with. Sometimes it gets very depressing. I just want to get my life moving in a positive direction. Anyway, thanks for your help. I look forward to hearing back from you.

Sue

Felons must be honest when applying for jobs



Hello Sue,
 
Felons must be honest when applying for jobs
That is a common mistake by ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs. Some believe by being honest they don’t have a chance at getting a job. The fact is an employer cannot legally refuse to hire you because you have a criminal record unless the conviction is directly related to the job for which you are applying. I have spoken with former inmates who have lied on applications and gotten jobs, only to lose them later when background checks were done. Some have been encouraged to use the response “Will discuss at interview.”  For ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, applications present a dilemma. Lie or not to lie. I advise job seekers to always be honest. If you are dishonest about your past, you risk having the truth exposed later. You may get a job only to lose it after the employer finds out the truth through a background check. You will be fired for being deceitful, not because you have a criminal record.In my opinion, these are not good practices. The best advice I can give is BE HONEST! Employers have a responsibility to know as much as possible about prospective employees.

As for applying for other jobs, you should always apply for any job you feel you qualify for. Never talk yourself out of a job.

If you chosen profession is teaching, public schools aren't you only option. You may not be eligible to teach in public schools but there are other options. Community colleges, adult learning annexes, private and charter schools are great places to start. They usually have fewer regulatory restrictions than public school systems.


I hope this helps.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

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Felons must be honest when applying for jobs


How to get a job with a criminal record



Felons must be honest when applying for jobs


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Jobs Felons can get

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Thursday, January 11, 2018

Jobs for Felons:Walmart closing 63 Sam's Club stores

Walmart is abruptly closing 63 Sam's Club stores and laying off thousands of workers



Hayley Peterson  Businessinsider.com


Jobs for Felons:Walmart closing 63 Sam's Club stores
Walmart is closing 63 Sam's Club stores across the US, the company told Business Insider.

Several stores were abruptly closed Thursday. In some cases, employees were not informed of the closures prior to showing up to work on Thursday.

Instead, they learned that their store would be closing when they found the store's doors locked and a notice announcing the closure, according to reports.


Ten of the affected stores will be turned into ecommerce distribution centers, and employees of those stores will have the opportunity to reapply for positions at those locations, a Walmart official said.

The remaining stores will stay open for several weeks before closing permanently. All of the affected stores were scrubbed from Sam's Club's website Thursday morning.

Sam's Club offered an explanation for the closures on Twitter, saying,

"After a thorough review of our existing portfolio, we’ve decided to close a series of clubs and better align our locations with our strategy. Closing clubs is never easy and we’re committed to working with impacted members and associates through this transition."



The closures come on the same day that Walmart announced it was raising starting hourly wages to $11, expanding employee benefits, and offering workers bonuses of up to $1,000.

Here's a list of closures rounded up from local media reports and Sam's Club employees that contacted Business Insider. The list will be updated as we learn of additional locations.

8801 Old Seward Hwy, Anchorage, AK 99515

48 College Rd, Fairbanks, AK 99701

3900 Grants Mill Rd, Irondale, AL 35210

2425 E Florence Blvd, Casa Grande, AZ 85194

5757 E State Route 69, Prescott Valley, AZ 86314

1375 S Arizona Ave, Chandler, AZ 85286

15255 N Northsight Blvd, Scottsdale, AZ 85260

3360 El Camino Ave, Sacramento, CA 95821

17835 Gale Ave, City of Industry, CA 91748

12540 Beach Blvd, Stanton, CA 90680

69 Pavilions Dr, Manchester, CT 06042

2 Boston Post Rd, Orange, CT 06477

355 FL-436, Fern Park, FL 32730

5135 S Dale Mabry Hwy, Tampa, FL 33611

2994 Turner Hill Rd, Lithonia, GA 30038

501 N Randall Rd, Batavia, IL 60510

21430 S Cicero Ave, Matteson, IL 60443

6600 44th Ave, Moline, IL 61265

808 S Illinois Rte 59, Naperville, IL 60540

900 S Barrington Rd, Streamwood, IL 60107

1055 McHenry Rd, Wheeling, IL 60090

460 S Weber Rd, Romeoville, IL 60446

3015 W 86th St, Indianapolis, IN 46268

10859 E Washington St, Indianapolis, IN 46229

4024 Elkhart Rd #1, Goshen, IN 46526

9598 Cortana Pl, Baton Rouge, LA 70815

9750 Reisterstown Rd, Owings Mills, MD 21117

1 Tobias Boland Way, Worcester, MA 01607

340 E. Edgewood Boulevard, Lansing, MI 48911

3745 Louisiana Ave S, St Louis Park, MN 55426

 2800 27th Ave S, Moorhead, MN 56560

11 Batchelder Rd, Seabrook, NH 03874

81 International Dr S, Budd Lake, NJ 07828

1900 E Linden Ave, Linden, NJ 07036

301 Nassau Park Boulevard, Princeton, NJ 08540

2649 Erie Blvd E, Syracuse, NY 13224

720 Fairmount Ave, Jamestown, NY 14701

700 Elmridge Center Dr, Rochester, NY 14626

1600 Marketplace Dr, Rochester, NY 14623

5085 Dawn Dr, Lumberton, NC 28360

1101 Shiloh Glenn Dr, Morrisville, NC 27560

4825 Marburg Ave, Cincinnati, OH 45209

9570 Fields Ertel Rd, Loveland, OH 45140

1805 Getwell Rd, Memphis, TN 38111

1615 S Loop W, Houston, TX 77054

13331 Westheimer Rd, Houston, TX 77077

22296 Market Place Dr, New Caney, TX 77357

12919 San Pedro Ave, San Antonio, TX 78216

741 E Little Creek Rd, Norfolk, VA 23518

4571 S Laburnum Ave, Richmond, VA 23231

901 S Grady Way, Renton, WA 98057

1101 Outlet Collection Way, Auburn, WA 98001

7050 Watts Rd, Madison, WI 53719

1540 S 108th St, West Allis, WI 53214

13550 Aurora Ave N, Seattle, WA 98133


If you know of stores closing that are missing from this list, reach out to hpeterson@businessinsider.com

We published this article because there are ex-offenders and felons who have been hired at Sam's locations.  Unfortunately there are fewer Sam's locations for felons to apply to


Jobs for Felons:Walmart closing 63 Sam's Club stores


Jobs for Felons:Walmart closing 63 Sam's Club stores


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record 

Jobs for Felons:Walmart closing 63 Sam's Club stores


Eric Mayo

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Monday, January 8, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market

Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market


BY NILA BALA, OPINION CONTRIBUTOR, the Hill

   Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market
Nearly one out of three Americans has a record in the criminal justice system and, as a result, faces a difficult road to becoming employed. Adding to their woes is the fact that many jobs — including interior designer, barber, pest control applicator and fire alarm installer — require some kind of occupational license.

Unfortunately, many states still deny licenses for individuals with criminal convictions, even when those convictions are decades old or relatively minor. The good news? Several states and cities across the country are poised to become leaders in reforming the law.

The number of jobs requiring occupational licenses has ballooned in the last 50 years. Occupational licensing has expanded from covering five percent of the workforce in the 1950s to 30 percent today. In recent years, occupational licenses have come under fire for creating unnecessary barriers to work without any measurable gains in safety or quality of services provided to the public.

Counter to what many believe, locking released individuals out of job opportunities is bad policy — it hurts returning citizens, our economy and public safety. Employment upon release is one of the key indicators in predicting whether individuals will commit another crime, and the sooner ex-offenders are employed, the less likely they will be to commit future crimes. States that consider license applications from returning citizens are demonstrably safer. In states willing to consider applications from ex-felons, the recidivism rate declined by 4.2 percent; in the 29 states where licensing boards outright reject applications from ex-felons, the recidivism rate actually rose by 9.4 percent.


Other states — such as Georgia, Illinois and Kentucky — have already passed measures to limit the consideration of criminal records in the licensing process. In Illinois, for instance, State Rep. Marcus Evans Jr. sponsored a law last year that forbade the state licensing department from disqualifying potential funeral directors, roofers, barbers, cosmetologists, hair braiders and nail technicians solely because of a criminal conviction — unless the conviction directly relates to the job.

Similarly, the D.C. Committee is currently considering an amendment to permit licensing boards to consider only convictions directly related to the job. The Removing Barriers to Occupational Licenses Amendment Act Of 2017 would also give the returning citizen an opportunity to provide mitigating evidence.

 The current language in D.C. guiding licensing boards is vague, denying any applicant whose offense “bears directly on the fitness of the person to be licensed.” As Councilman Charles Allen, one of the sponsors of the bill, pointed out at the Nov. 28 committee hearing that the law provides “no explanation of what fitness means, or how it should be determined.” Society would be better served with a narrowly tailored law that provides clarity to applicants and licensing boards alike.

Not surprisingly, professional associations are uncomfortable with licensing reforms. The Boards of Chiropractic, Medicine, Nursing, Respiratory Care and Dentistry all opposed the D.C. bill. The main argument supplied was that, without a review of an individual’s entire record, public safety would be harmed.

However, the proposed amendment would not prevent licensing boards from considering convictions directly relevant to the occupation in question. None of the professional associations opposed to the bill explained why considering irrelevant information would protect the public.

Additionally, all of the professional associations argued that very few applicants, even those who have had contact with the criminal justice system, are denied licenses. However, many individuals with criminal records do not even apply for licensure because they believe their past conviction is an immediate disqualification. This is why a key component of a law removing barriers to licensing should be education and publication — provisions that are not currently contained in the bill’s language.

The current laws are not conducive to public safety and deny returning citizens the dignity of work — the pride in making a living and providing for their family. Preventing a large swath of individuals from obtaining occupational licenses simply because of prior contact with the criminal justice system is bad policy. Those who have paid their debts to society deserve at least a fighting chance to obtain occupational licenses.

Nila Bala is a senior fellow for criminal justice policy at the R Street Institute, a nonprofit group dedicated to promoting limited government in Washington, D.C.


Jobs for Felons: Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market


Jobs for Felons: Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market


  Occupational licensing locks too many Americans out of the job market


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | High Paying Jobs for felons | Jobs felons can get | Occupational Licenses for Felons



Eric Mayo

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Thursday, December 28, 2017

Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?

Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?

Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?
I have been reading your blog for a while.  I applied to some of your some of the employers on your list but I have not been contacted by any one of them.  My cousin works at one of them.  She has a record too.  Why can she get a job and I can't?  What can I do?


Kathryn from Marietta, GA


Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?



Hello Kathryn,

I'm sorry you are having so much trouble finding a job.  Regarding our List of Companies that Hire Felons, many people are confused by this list.  The employers on the list will not hire you just because you are a felon.  These employers hire a felon if he or she is the best person for the job.

I have been working with felons for a long time and I find that the most difficult felon to help get hired are those with any type of sex offense.  Plain and simple, most employers want nothing to do with sex offenders.  Their best opportunities to get hired is to apply for jobs that have limited contact with people. Unfortunately, most sex offenders cannot work anywhere near schools, parks or anywhere there are children.  This makes things a lot more difficult for them

The next most difficult group, are those with any type of what I call integrity crimes.  Those with any type of theft, robbery, forgery, identity theft, fraud and similar convictions have a difficult time.  They have little opportunity for retail jobs or any jobs that require trust of any kind.

The third most difficult convictions to work with are violent crimes.  Applicants with any type of assault or weapons convictions are a concern to employers and they are often avoided.  Once again, those with any type of violent crimes may have more success applying for jobs that require minimal contact with other people.

I don't know what your conviction(s) or what types of jobs you have been applying for, but I hope this sheds some light on your situation.

Finding a job is not an exact science.  People without criminal records don't always get jobs they apply for.  The best advice I can give you is to apply for every job you feel qualified for.  The more jobs you apply for, the greater opportunities you will have to get interviews.  The more interviews you get, the more opportunities you will have to get a job

Best of luck to you.




Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where Ex-offenders and Felons Can Find Jobs




Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal record




Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?


Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Felons can get Jobs


Why can't I get a Job with my Conviction?


Eric Mayo

Read More

 
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