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Monday, May 21, 2018

Oregon company makes a point of hiring ex-convicts

 Oregon company makes a point of hiring ex-convicts
About one in three of the more than 300 employees at Oregon-based Dave's Killer Bread has a criminal background.  - 

By 

A major effort is under way in this country to reform the way we sentence drug criminals. Thousands of felons are getting early release according to the U.S. Sentencing Commission,  and that will continue for years to come.

The question is, will there be jobs for them?

If you visit the bakery at Dave's Killer Bread outside Portland, you'll find pumps sucking two-thousand pounds of ingredients into mixing bowls.  You'll also find that a third of the company's 300 employees have a criminal past, including plant manager Ronnie Elrod. 


“We're just so happy to have a job that typically we've got an attitude of gratitude rather than a sense of entitlement.  And we also know that opportunities are going to be hard to come by for us so we have to take those opportunities that come along and we really have to make good on them,” Elrod said.

And Harvard sociologist Devah Pager believes that's true.  She is studying the job performance of ex-cons in the military. “Those with serious criminal pasts perform just as well if not better than their counterparts with no criminal records.  At least with appropriate kinds of screening, individuals with serious criminal records can perform very well in the workplace,” she said.

Another of Pager's studies  shows that a criminal record seriously reduces the chances of getting a job. “I hired groups of young men to pose as job applicants and sent them all over the city applying for jobs and half the time they reported having a felony conviction and simply by checking that box, their chances of  receiving a call-back or job offer were cut in half,” Pager said.

Dave's Killer Bread has hired so many ex-convicts because, well because of Dave...Dave Dahl, that is. After serving 15 years for drug crimes, Dahl returned to his family's bakery and in 2005 created his namesake bread. “It was based on the epiphany I had in prison which was that I could turn my own life around and eventually the feeling was that we could help others to do the same thing if they were willing to do most of the work themselves,” Dahl said.

The company uses its hiring practices as a selling point, with Dahl's picture on every package, even though a judge put him on conditional release after he rammed into some police cars two years ago.

This year Dave's Killer Bread was sold to Flowers Foods for $275 million. 


 Oregon company makes a point of hiring ex-convicts


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

Oregon company makes a point of hiring ex-convicts


Eric Mayo

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Thursday, May 17, 2018

Felon with Many Skills Needs a Job

Felon with Many Skills Needs a Job


Felon with Many Skills Needs a Job
In 2004 I committed a Felony 4 Theft . I was convicted but no jail time, I was placed on probation which I have completed. In 2006, I was given another Felony for Unemployment Fraud again no jail time and amount paid back before court hearing. These two Felonies were huge mistakes in my life and very humiliating for me everyday of my life. I went from a $70,000 a year job in Dayton, Ohio with great benefits to a $40,000 a year job with little to no benefits and currently unemployed.

Through these past seven years I have lost my family of two wonderful children and a great wife who has been by my side through all of this humiliation. I lost my home and my dignity We all live from my mistakes and I keep trying to get back into the career I am very good at but can not get past the background checks that many companies require before they hire a person. Twice, I made it all the way to actually going to the new work place and working over 5 hours before the HR department came down with a delayed background report and the bad news that I can not work for this company due to background convictions.

I am so tired of having to live each day in humiliation, not being able to provide for my family and have a place to call my own home. I have learned many things these past seven years and have seen how less forfeit people survive on little to no income. I have an education and so many technical skills and can get hundreds of jobs at or around $80,000 a year and could provide for myself and my family and their futures for college and retirement. but I get shutdown with one question, “have you ever been convicted of a felony”.

I am asking you to please help me in any way you can to be able to get these two mistakes off my background. I am sincerely sorry for all my mistakes.

Please, any advice would be helpful. I am losing hope and faith!

Thank You,

G.S.


 Felon with Many Skills Needs a Job



Hello G.S.,

Finding a job with a criminal record often isn't easy. Ex-offenders and felons stand a better chance at getting hired by applying at smaller businesses. Smaller businesses are less apt to spend money on expensive background checks. One out-of-the-box suggestion I have is, if the the application on paper, leave the question that relates to having a criminal record blank. It is often overlooked by being left blank and you won’t have to address the question at all. If it is noticed, and you are questioned, always answer truthfully. Hopefully you will get an interview where the employer will get a chance to meet the person behind the application and you can sell yourself.

Felon with Many Skills Needs a Job
I often suggest to ex-offenders and felons looking for employment is to apply for temporary employment. There are clerical or other jobs that would put you in an office environment. There was a time that going to a temporary agency was the last resort for many job seekers, but for ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, it is a good place to begin a new career.  In the past five years, the demand for temporary employees has risen over 30%.  In these tough economic times, companies are searching for ways to keep their labor costs down so they can remain competitive.  More and more employers are utilizing temporary staffing agencies as a way to cost effectively fill vacancies.  Not only do companies save money by using temporary labor, they get an opportunity to try out new workers before hiring them on a full time basis.  Another interesting trend is the length of assignments.  It is not uncommon for an assignment to last up to six months, so a temporary assignment may not be so temporary.  Often companies end up hiring their temporary help if they prove to be good employees.  You may also pick up some new skills and even make new business contacts that may be valuable later.

There is a twist for ex-offenders and felons when it comes to applying for temporary assignments. They should apply at smaller independent temporary employment agencies. Independent agencies don't have to deal with restrictions larger agencies may have placed on them by their parent companies as they relate to hiring ex-offenders and felons. They are free to hire anyone they choose. You can find listing in your local telephone directory and make appointments for interviews and prepare yourself accordingly. Be professional and dress as if it's a 'real' interview, because it is.  You will be employed by the staffing agency and they will send you to assignments.  Make sure you have an up-to-date resume and work on your interviewing skills. While agencies unquestionably will look at your work history and skills to determine a proper fit, the interview is the key to getting a good placement.  The person conducting the interview is usually the same person who will decide what assignment you'll be offered. Your aim should always be to make a good first impression. Do not talk about your criminal history until you are directly asked about it.  If you are asked, be honest but brief.


Even if the assignment you get isn't in your field, hey, a bucks a buck and it will help tide you over until better opportunities present themselves.

Best of luck to you.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Felon with Many Skills Needs a Job


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons 






Felon with Many Skills Needs a Job


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons |Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

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Monday, May 7, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Why Ex-Prisoners Struggle to Successfully Reintegrate into Society

Felon Housing


By Dr. Michael Pittaro, Faculty Member, Criminal Justice at American Military University

Every week, more than 10,000 prisoners are released from America’s state and federal prisons, equating to more than 650,000 ex-prisoners annually reintegrating into society, according to the U.S. Department of Justice. However, recidivism rates are extremely high with approximately two-thirds of ex-prisoners being rearrested within three years of release, according to the Recidivism Center. It’s estimated that nine million offenders return to prison annually.


It’s clear that there’s not enough support to help ex-prisoners stay out of the correctional system. This is just one element sustaining the disproportionate incarceration of African American males. The likelihood of an African American male being sentenced to prison in his lifetime is one in three, whereas for a Caucasian male it is one in 17, according to The Huffington Post. Similarly, African American females are being sentenced to prison at a far greater rate than Caucasian females.

The criminal justice system needs more resources to improve reintegration efforts and help ex-offenders find adequate jobs and housing so they’re less likely to re-offend. Helping ex-prisoners successfully reintegrate into society will not only reduce costly recidivism rates, but, in many cases, will help break the intergenerational cycle of criminality.

Improving Housing Options for Ex-Prisoners

Most ex-prisoners will return to the same communities they lived and socialized in before their arrest. In many cases, these are neighborhoods that have high rates of poverty and crime, leaving many residents feeling disenfranchised from society with little access to social support programs.

In a prior publication, “Prisoner Reintegration Challenges of Assimilation and Crime Desistance,” I concluded that most ex-prisoners returning to these communities will face uncertainty over their future and animosity from a predominantly unforgiving society, as well as a multitude of personal, social, and legal barriers that prevent them from leading law-abiding lives.

Finding safe and affordable housing is difficult for ex-prisoners who often face limitations on where they can live. Many times, low-income public housing is their only choice. These housing developments are often overrun with drugs, gang violence, and other criminogenic factors. Private housing is often not an option because ex-prisoners are exclusively barred from the private housing market due to the stigma of being an ex-felon.

In some cases, even the public housing market has banned ex-prisoners from renting or leasing an apartment, which can happen if the criminal conviction was drug-related, a sexual offense, or a crime of violence as outlined in the exclusionary policies of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. If ex-prisoners are forced to return to the same destructive environment that contributed to their initial incarceration, they will often submit to the same temptations and reoffend.

Barriers to Employment for Ex-Prisoners

Along with obtaining suitable housing, finding and maintaining employment can greatly improve an ex-prisoner’s odds of leading a crime-free, productive life. However, ex-prisoners face the society-wide stigma of being an ex-convict, which severely limits the number of sustainable job opportunities available to them.

Many employers conduct criminal history checks on prospective employees and reject anyone with a criminal history. In a somewhat dated, yet significant Urban Institute study from 2003, more than 90 percent of employers surveyed were willing to consider filling job vacancies with welfare recipients, while only about 40 percent were willing to consider hiring an ex-prisoner.

Companies in the retail and service sector that require contact with customers are among the most unlikely to consider hiring a convict. Employer reluctance is greatest when the offense in question was a violent one and least when it was a nonviolent drug offense.

Many ex-prisoners are limited to working inconsistent, low-wage jobs – such as in construction or manufacturing – that make it incredibly difficult to support themselves and their families. In addition, ex-prisoners are often mandated to pay further penalties including parole supervision fees, court costs, restitution, child support, drug-testing fees, counseling fees, and more.

To complicate matters further, finding employment opportunities can be especially challenging because many offenders have limited work histories. According to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, more than one third of all prisoners were unemployed at the time of arrest.

Educational Obstacles to Finding Employment

The National Reentry Resource Center concluded that only about half of incarcerated adults have a high school degree or its equivalent, compared with 85 percent of the adult population. In Prisoner Reintegration Challenges of Assimilation and Crime Desistance, I noted that most ex-prisoners do not have viable, marketable job skills, or sufficient literacy to obtain gainful employment.

To compound matters, many prisoners have a learning disability. According to Joan Petersilia, 11 percent of prisoners have a documented learning disability compared with only 3 percent of the general adult population.

While there are some educational opportunities available to inmates while they are imprisoned, only one third of all prisoners choose to participate. Educational programming, including specific classes that focus on GED preparation, adult basic education, and learning English as a second language, would collectively improve odds of employment.

There’s no doubt that more must be done to help break down the barriers that hinder ex-prisoners from leading law-abiding and productive lives. Helping them find adequate housing and providing educational opportunities that leads to gainful employment are all critical to successful reintegration and reductions in recidivism. However, ultimate change must come from the offender. The ex-prisoner can break the cycle of criminality only by changing his or her unlawful ways. Ex-prisoners must abstain from crime, substance abuse, and other problematic areas which put themselves at risk. They must also seek out opportunities to improve their situation and put in the work and effort to lead productive and lawful lives.

About the Author: Dr. Michael Pittaro is an Assistant Professor of Criminal Justice with American Military University and an Adjunct Professor at East Stroudsburg University. Dr. Pittaro is a criminal justice veteran, highly experienced in working with criminal offenders in a variety of institutional and non-institutional settings. Before pursuing a career in higher education, Dr. Pittaro worked in corrections administration; has served as the Executive Director of an outpatient drug and alcohol facility and as Executive Director of a drug and alcohol prevention agency. Dr. Pittaro has been teaching at the university level (online and on-campus) for the past 15 years while also serving internationally as an author, editor, presenter, and subject matter expert. Dr. Pittaro holds a BS in Criminal Justice; an MPA in Public Administration; and a PhD in criminal justice. To contact the author, please email IPSauthor@apus.edu. For more articles featuring insight from industry experts, subscribe to In Public Safety’s bi-monthly newsletter.




Companies that hire felons





companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | recidivism | Re-entry

Jobs for Felons: Why Ex-Prisoners Struggle to Successfully Reintegrate into Society




Eric Mayo

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Felon in D.C. needs a job

Felon in D.C. needs a job


Felon in D.C. needs a Jobs for felons
Hi my name is LaToya and I am an ex felon. I just feel like I'm going through a rough time right now, feeling real down on myself for the mistakes i have made in the past. Now no one will give a chance. I just completed a program (Center of Employment training) for Building Maintenance in Washington, DC but nothing has changed still can't find a job. What am I supposed to do? Just feel like giving up.... Please give me some advice, what can I do?




 




Felon in D.C. needs a job



Hello LaToya,

As I tell most ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, It's going to take hard work, determination
and having the right tools.

Felon in D.C. needs a jobYou can get a lot of help at your local One-stop Career center. You will find a variety of services that can help you get a job. You can get help with a resume, interviewing skills and a list of open jobs in your area. Most centers have counselors who have experience helping ex-offenders and felons get jobs.

You can find your nearest One-stop center here:

http://www.servicelocator.org/Search/etaSearchOffice.asp?zip=&city=&state=DC&proximity=10&search=Search



I hope this helps.


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Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

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Felon in D.C. needs a job

Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)





 

Felon Job\



companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons | One-stop Career Center

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