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Sunday, April 20, 2014

Felons can use Newspaper Want Ads to get Jobs

Felons can use Newspaper Want Ads to get Jobs


Felons can use Newspaper Want Ads to get Jobs
Many felons turn to the newspaper help-wanted to find jobs. Help wanted ads are a good sources of listings, especial for jobs listed by local employers who don't advertise nationally. Though there are often many jobs listed there, the odds of getting a job this way is against them .

Consider this:

A typical want ad will get between 200 and 500 responses. There will a lot of competition for each job.

Jobs listed in the newspaper account for less than 10% of all available jobs. Some advertised jobs don’t exist. In some cases, the opening may have already been filled but
the company must advertise it because of some requirement.

A job that is constantly advertised may be so bad or pay so poorly that the employer may have trouble keeping employees.

Want ads are not a total waste of your time and energy. There are a few advantages to using the want ads to find a job.

Felons can use Newspaper Want Ads to get JobsJob advertisements are fast. Respond to an ad right away, and you could be hired rather quickly.

For many felons, using the want ads to find openings is less stressful than asking others for help finding a job.

Newspaper want ads easily let you know what the job qualifications are. The qualifications are in the ad so you can tailor your resume, cover letter and interview to what the employer is looking for.
Search  for “entry-level” positions. Entry-level jobs generally don’t pay a lot but they offer the opportunity to work on building an employment history and get valuable experience.

Go through all the ads, not just those in the category for which you're interested. Sometimes job openings will be in a completely different section than where you'd expect. For instance, if you're looking for a job driving a truck, you should look in the "transportation" section.

The odds are against you getting a job this way, but a little hard work will increase your chances of getting a job.

Even though there are many listings in the newspaper, for felons, the want-ads may not be the best choice to find the next job opportunity but it is worth a look.

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Jobs for felons: Finding jobs with help wanted ads for felons and ex-offenders


Jobs for felons: Where Ex-offenders and Felons can find Jobs

 
Felons can use Newspaper Want Ads to get Jobs

Felons can use Newspaper Want Ads to get Jobs

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felons can use Newspaper Want Ads to get Jobs
 

Felons can use Newspaper Want Ads to get Jobs

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Friday, April 18, 2014

Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons make

 Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons make 



Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons make
Ex-offenders and felons,  know how difficult it is to get a job interview.  After properly filling out application after application including the dreaded "Have you ever been convicted of a crime.....?" question and you got an interview.  There are too many people who blow the opportunity to get jobs by making costly mistakes.  Make the most out your next opportunity by avoiding these top five mistakes made by ex-offenders and felons.

1.  Being Late - There is absolutely no excuse for being late to an interview.  To the interviewer, if you are late to the interview, you'll be late for work.  Everyone know that things happen.  Murphy's law is always in effect.  Sometimes thing go wrong.  Being organized is the best way to keep on schedule.  Find out where your interview is and know exactly how long it will take you to get there.  If you have never been there, I strongly suggest you go there a day or so before the interview just to see how long it will take to get there.  Once you know how long it will take, plan to get there at least 15 minutes early.

2.  Dress Inappropriately - An interview is a business meeting.  Does your clothing make you look more like an ex-offender or a businessman?  Proper clothing will be the difference between being hired and not being hired.  Whatever you have to do, get the right clothing.  Remember, you will never get a second chance to make a first impression.

3.  Talking Too Much - Employment interviews should not be used to tell your life story or ramble on about mistakes you have made in the past.  Just remember "TMI," too much information. Too often when folks are nervous, and interviews do make people nervous, they talk too much.  Never talk about personal situations, habits, or relationships.  Be friendly but never tell more than anyone needs to know.  Particularly avoid conversations about religious beliefs, politics, or sex.  If questioned about your convictions, briefly answer questions without going into detail.  Make reference to the amount of time that has gone by and what you have learned from your experience.  Also talk about the progress you have made and the things you have done to make yourself better.

4.  Using Slang or Profanity - As stated before, the interview is a business meeting between two professionals.  You must be professional at all times. There is absolutely no place for slang or profanity here.

5.  Not Turning off Your Cell Phone - Cell phones are a great convenience but they have no place on an interview.  Turning off your phone allows you to focus on your interview and will eliminate the possibility of the rude interruption of  it ringing.

Ex-offenders and felons have a difficult time finding employers who will consider them for jobs.  When interviews do come, avoid ruining these opportunities with these critical mistakes and get hired.

Take a few minutes to get more great information from the videos below that can give you a huge advantage at your next interview.

  Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons make 

 


These are some great tips along with some things felons should avoid at their next interview opportunity

Getting an interview is a great opportunity that felons must take full advantage of.  Too many people make mistakes that ruin their chances to get jobs.  Unfortunately, some people do not know that they are making mistakes.



Learn from Human Resources professional what the most common interview mistakes are and how to avoid them on your next interview.  pt 1


Learn from Human Resources professional what the most common interview mistakes are and how to avoid them on your next interview.  pt 2


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Jobs for Felons: Five Things that get Ex-offenders and Felons Jobs

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!


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Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job


 Ex-offender may need legal help to get a jobHello,

My name is Tim. I was reading the blogs on the web site. I have complete compassion in this matter as I am also a convicted felon. It's shameful just to say it aloud, but like the others I have accepted it and realized what I have done is wrong.  My convictions unfortunately were aimed mainly at my parents when I was younger do to an emotionally unstable home life. I have corrected my problems and own emotional bouts. I am a successful father of two beautiful little girls and engaged to the most wonderful woman on this planet. We are buying a house soon on her income....I feel less of a person not being able to provide for my family.

I was told last week by Kelly services after an interview that I had the job. It was the best news I heard since my lady said yes to that important question after we laid our baby girl down for the night. I went to work today, I loved it. I liked it so much I started to talking to the human resources person about retirement and shares in the biz. I received a phone call on the way home tonight which is what has sparked my efforts for finding an answer online. Kelly services was relaying a message that a background check had come back and they found a felony.

The conviction that was in question was a misdemeanor. I'm not even sure that will save me from what's ahead but I plan on taking immediate action in the morning. My hopes lie within the kind heart of the hr woman from the place I was employed. The conviction in '07 was not a felony, if there is any possible way to get that taken care of on a very bare income please let me know. Thank you for your time and have wonderful day.

Sincerely,

Tim


Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job



Hello Tim,

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job
Two things come to mind. First, if the conviction was on the application, It wouldn't be a question. As I suggest to all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, be totally honest when completing employment applications. It would make no sense to leave convictions off when applying, get hired and than lose the job when background checks are done at a later time.

If your only situation is that your misdemeanor is listed as a felony, one option is to have the prosecutor associated with your case to correct the situation. Often the prosecutor has the power to downgrade a felony to a misdemeanor.  If there was an error, you should have no problem getting this done.  If you have no success there, I suggest contacting your local legal aid office. There you may be able to get low-cost or even no-cost assistance correcting your situation. Often ex-offenders and felons looking for employment require some legal assistance and that is a good place to start.

I hope this helps

Jobs for felons: Expungement - A Way to Erase Your Criminal Record





Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job

Jobs for Felons: Five Things that get Ex-offenders and Felons Jobs

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job

Read More

A So-called "Felon" Speaks Out

 A So-called "Felon" Speaks Out



A So-called "Felon" Speaks OutFrequently I get questions from ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs and job search assistance. From time to time I get mail form ex-offenders and felons just wanting to be heard. Take a few minutes and read something I received from a reader of this blog. Feel free to comment.







 A So-called "Felon" Speaks Out



Dear Eric,

I’m writing in hopes of letting my story be known to help and encourage women of all ethnicities, cultures, socioeconomic status, and the alike. I was watching Mo’Nique's documentary entitled, “Women Behind Bars,” and saw myself. I don’t believe I’ve cried with such intensity in years and absolutely hate to see women placed in such testing predicaments. Having experienced adversity and can understand how simple it is to be caught within certain circumstances. But now I have a question I’d like to ask the world, a felon serving time, paying back debts to society or whatever discipline is necessary, I concur, but what else is expected of a felon when seen as a title and society won’t assist these human beings (felons) back into what is called a “forgiving world.” Living in Colorado, I have come to experience racism from many aspects, African American, female (educated), epileptic (disability), and a felon. With these characteristics defining me as a person, employment, or to suggest a second chance in the state of Colorado is almost non- existent. Employers in Colorado do not assist felons with employment necessary to pay back debts, live efficiently and evade recidivism, where most felons eventually return to a life of crime for a means of survival.

I for example, unemployed and being a convicted felon am ineligible for assistance. I’m curious to know what services, options, choices and the alike are available for cultured felons? To give a brief synopsis of my conviction; I plead guilty to and was convicted of a misprision of a felony in 2006 a crime committed by a young man in 2002. Misprison of a felony was an offense under the common law of England and was classified as a misdemeanor. It consisted of failing to report knowledge of a felony to the appropriate authorities. After the 9/11 tragedy, the United States, reinstated the Patriot Act, adopted and revised England's law of a misdemeanor "misprison of a felony" making it a felony and terrorist act to protect the country against further terrorists or terrorist acts (basically ourselves). Having knowledge of a crime or criminal, placed me in the category of being a terrorist threat to my country. Though it is documented a witness came forward in 2003 stating money was offered in exchange for my life, instead of providing protection for a US citizen, the government chose to convict and sentence a U.S. citizen for essentially not “snitching” and protecting the lives of her and her family. When we have no one in the country we can trust, who do we turn to? When families are afraid and fear for their lives added with the lives of their children (i.e. domestic violence homicides) and the government deems the victim(s) as a terrorist or their actions a terrorist act, where do we go and what do we do to protect our own?

Having no prior criminal history, I was sentenced to one year in a woman’s federal facility in Fort Worth, Texas (released October 2007) and one year probation (completed 2008). Since my release in 2007, I completed and received a B.S., in Criminal Justice with an emphasis in Domestic Violence and Juvenile Delinquency. Wanting to increase my awareness and familiarity of family, I directed my career objective to counsel women and children; and enrolled in Argosy University where (passing the necessary exams) I will receive an MBA, LPC in Clinical Mental Health Counseling in September of 2012. While attending school full-time, I volunteered with Bridges of Silence; an after school tutoring program for children and youth; ages 6-18. But ineligible for hire due to a felony back ground. At the same time, I completed training to obtain certification for CPR, Standard First Aid, and Blood Pathogens.

Now having a criminal history, I will use my story as an example for others to follow when making what could be life changing choices. I was what most considered “The All American Girl” born in the United States, first job at the Mall, age sixteen, honor roll, track star, peer counselor, comedian, prom queen, and later registered to vote, age eighteen. I like to think I was a model citizen until my choices lead me to a path of devastation. I made a mistake in my choice of friends, relationships, life in general and feel I owe it to society, in particular, the younger generation to emphasize the importance of where our choices, positive and or negative, could eventually lead us. Working with and empowering children is a difficult task, and is not encouraged when one has a felony record. I do discourage convictions involving children, but rather, use a conviction such as my own, to dissuade children from following the same path. I am often discouraged from many job openings with children for discrimination purposes as all of the applications clearly specify, “a felony conviction does not automatically disqualify employment,” however, having that title automatically places a negative stigma amongst employers, volunteers, and society as a whole.

Seeing the displacement of children and adolescents due to their wrong or bad choices isn’t the example I want to lead by. Rather, be that example to demonstrate that “yes” I made a bad choice, but a bad choice does not make me a bad person. If I had put some thought into my decisions, then I would not have made those mistakes. But, it’s too late, “I am unable to take it back,” however, I can grow from it. My purpose in life now is to give back, and help deter others from making the same mistakes I did.

The state of Colorado seems to be the least forgiving state of felons; the entire realm of felonies should be classified separately, but are grouped and stigmatized as all being a nuisance to society. These stigmas may be the foundation to many felons either falsifying the fact of having a conviction or falsifying their credentials, where even “I” have been informed of being, “over qualified.” Whom do felons go to for help or work? No one wants to hear our side; they look at the title and automatically make assumptions as to who you are as a person!

President Barack Obama signed into law on April 9, 2008, the Second Chance Act (P.L. 110-199) which was designed to improve outcomes for people returning to communities from prisons and jails. We as citizens were lead to believe it was intended to authorize federal grants to government agencies and nonprofit organizations to provide employment assistance, substance abuse treatment, housing, family programming, mentoring, victims support, and other services that can help reduce recidivism. However, this Second Chance Act is nonexistent in the state of Colorado, evident on every application as emphasis is placed on “a felony conviction does not automatically disqualify an applicant,” but, very well guarantees the likelihood of your application not being viewed.

I’ve accepted responsibility for the crime I committed, and owe it to future generations to help deter them from possibly making the same mistake in their lives. I want to be of assistance to my country, not be on assistance. I have been told being a convicted felon makes me ineligible for assistance in the state of Colorado. Does it help or hinder the situation, single, without children, and refusing to claim epilepsy as a disability? I’m asking for assistance in finding employment in the state of Colorado, and for a second chance that will allow me to go forward and give the necessary message to our children. Though my crime had nothing to do with children, I was recently informed that my felony conviction will not allow me to be eligible to counsel children.

Confused, as a felon I am an excellent candidate for a volunteer and or mentor for children, but the title felon suggests I also pose a threat to children and society as a whole. Once again, felon is a title, it is not who I am. Thank you for taking the time to read and absorb my story. The moral of the story is felons are people to, and we should be treated as such. The only difference between me and others without the title of “felon” is I was wedged between a rock and a hard place. A movie I recommend for all Americans is “Loose Change.” Then when it comes to you having to make that choice for your family, what choice will you make? Will your government (country) be there for you as you are expected to be for your government (country)?

Sincerely,

Tina L.


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 A So-called "Felon" Speaks Out


Jobs for Felons: Five Things that get Ex-offenders and Felons Jobs

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

 A So-called "Felon" Speaks Out

Read More

 
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