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Wednesday, June 20, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Educated Felon is Looking for Good Job

Jobs for Felons: Educated Felon is Looking for Good Job



Jobs for Felons: Educated Felon is Looking for Good Job
Hello,

I came across your blog on jailtojob.com and read an entry from 2015 that pretty much reflects what's currently going on in my long time boyfriend's life. He recently got his second felony for a drug conviction in 2016. He previously was out of trouble for 10 years, and was actually on his way to obtain his certificate of rehabilitation. Unfortunately, that's no longer on the table now that he has his recent conviction on his record. He's currently serving his probation, but is due for a review in court next week to see if he can get off early (keeping our fingers crossed).

I'm sure as you well know, it is extremely difficult for an ex felon to find gainful employment. It's incredibly discouraging, even for me. I try to be positive and be some sort of resource for him, but he has a very self-defeating attitude right now and I just want to help him. Yes, I recognize that he has made it much more difficult for himself to find a job with a good salary and benefits, but I'm more of an optimist and I try my best to believe that something will come along, if he puts in the work.

He is educated (he has his BA from Cal State Northridge in Psychology) and has work experience in the respite health field. He now believes that is no longer an option for him, once they do a background check he'll be denied. He is very well spoken, and is like a chameleon- he is able to integrate himself pretty effortlessly into anything he puts his mind to...he just needs that opportunity to prove it.  He needs someone who is willing to give him a chance to provide for himself, his family and start preparing for his future. 

Do you have any advice? A direction we can go into that will help him find a job that he will find rewarding, and gainful? I am aware of the Federal Bonding program and have that to bring to the table, but he is very discouraged, depressed and going through some type of learned helplessness. I just want to find something for him to be successful at. Anything I suggest, he seems to retort with a reason why it won't work out. His probation officer is no help, and is hardly familiar with his case.  He hasn't offered any assistance or resources and when I ask my boyfriend to inquire about it with his PO, he shrugs it off and says things like, "i'm just a speck in his caseload". He also doesn't want to bring any unwanted attention to himself, so as to not cause any problems.

I'm at a loss. I myself am working a salary job, but it certainly isn't enough and I know he will only be happy once he's offered a position that will grant him the ability to provide a comfortable life for himself and his family. I don't want him believing that he is only destined for a minimum wage job for the rest of his life....


Anything helps,

Jessica 


Jobs for Felons: Educated Felon is Looking for Good Job



Hello Jessica,

Jobs for Felons: Educated Felon is Looking for Good JobIt seems that your boyfriend has dug himself a bit of a hole.  All is not lost.  One thing I might try is the local community college.  Community colleges are always looking for adjunct instructors to teach freshman classes.  Adjunct instructors are used on an as-needed basis but it is a great way t0 get a start in the professional world.

Another thing to try is contact your local councilperson.  Council members in touch with a lot of things and people in the community.  They may know of open positions in the area,  Remember council members are politicians and every person is a potential vote.

Jobs for Felons: Educated Felon is Looking for Good JobAnother option is to apply for temporary employment.  Working for a temporary agency is a great way to quickly get a job.  Often temporary assignments turn into permanent jobs.  Some agencies have clients that require professional employees.  The key to felons applying to temporary agencies is to apply to smaller, privately owned agencies rather that large national companies.  Sometimes larger companies have guidelines that prohibit the hiring of felons.  Smaller agencies are free to hire anyone they choose so your boyfriend may have better luck with them.

Frequent readers of my blog know that everyone I speak to who is looking for a job I direct to the local One-stop Career Center.  Each state has a network of centers that offer a variety of free services that can assist you in finding employment. In addition, these centers offer a wide array of services that can help a felon get jobs. Some services available are:

Jobs for Felons: Educated Felon is Looking for Good JobCounselors for One-on-one Assistance

Workshops (Resume Writing, Interviewing Skills, and related topics.)

Computers with internet access and word processing

Lists of thousands of job listings

Printers, fax machines, phones, and copiers for job search use

Each center has counselors there that help clients in their job searches. 

You can find the nearest location of the One Stop Career Center in your local phone book or on the web at:


I hope this helps.



Jobs for Felons: Educated Felon is Looking for Good Job


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)




Jobs for Felons: Five Places Felons Can Find Jobs - Get a Job Quickly!




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Eric Mayo

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Monday, June 4, 2018

Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs

Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs


Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs


Getting a job is hard. Getting a job with a criminal record is definitely harder. Having a criminal record is no reason to give up hope.  Ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs will have greater success by developing a plan using these important steps.



Dress like a professional!

There is no substitute for a powerful first impression.   If ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs want to be treated like professionals, they ought to look like professionals. A fact of life is that most of us will be judged at least partially, by the way we look.  Meeting someone for the first time, you should look as professional as possible.  You will never get a second chance to make a first impression.


Get a personal contact card

Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs
Nothing will set you apart from the competition like having your own contact card! A professionally done contact card will leave everyone you meet with a powerful, professional, lasting impression.  Your card should include your name, address, telephone number and email address.  If you have a particular profession or skill, it should also be on the card.  Your local printer can help you put one together. You will be amazed just how affordable this powerful little tool can be.


Always be honest

Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs
I encourage ex-offenders and felons to always be honest when searching for jobs especially on applications and interviews. There is often a temptation to lie about criminal pasts.  I have know many people who have not been honest on applications and gotten jobs, only to get fired later when background checks are done.  It is always better to be honest.

If you are asked about criminal records on interviews, you should briefly speak about it but focus on what you have learned and why having a job and working hard is important.


Use resumes and cover letters to get jobs

Ex-offenders and Felons can get JobsEx-offenders and felons will have more success getting hired if they can get their resumes into the hands of people who can hire them.  Sending a resume with a cover letter will give them a huge advantage.  A well written cover letter will introduce you and help you ask for an interview in a professional way.  Often when ex-offenders and felons inquire about jobs this way, the question of criminal records never comes up.  If you don't know much about writing a cover letter, find someone who does and get it done properly.



Build a good network

Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs
Most people get jobs through people they know. Who you know is often just as important as what you know. Finding job leads from people you know is called networking and it is without question the single most powerful way to get a job. Many jobs are never advertised because they are often filled by personal referrals. In fact, employers would rather hire somebody referred to them instead of looking through piles of resumes and applications.

Contact as many people as you can think of and ask if they know of anyone who is hiring. 


Build a list of good references

Ex-offenders and Felons can get JobsA lot of applications ask for personal or professional references. A reference is someone who would say something positive about you or your work performance. Past teachers, previous employers, ministers, and other prominent members of your community would all be great references. Please ask people if they be a reference for you before you list them.


Always be on time!

You should always plan to arrive at least 15 minutes beforeEx-offenders and Felons can get Jobsfor all interviews and other appointments. Arriving early will allow you to relax and make any final preparations.  You must know exactly how long it would take to get to the interview location.  If you don't know, make a dry run to the location a day or so before to gauge your travel time.  There is absolutely no excuse for ever being late.


 Practice and prepare!

Getting a job with a criminal record will depend on how well you prepare. Practice everything on your job search from filling out applications, shaking hands, body language and interviewing.
Ex-offenders and Felons can get JobsLike anything else, interviewing well will take practice. The more you practice, the better you will get.  Practice your body language in front of a mirror. Predict the interviewer’s questions and practice answering them until they sound natural. Don't memorize your answers but practice making them complete thoughts in your own words...

Get friends and family members to take turns being the interviewer.  Practice the whole interview from beginning to end. If  possible, make video recordings of your practice interviews so you can see and hear your responses to questions and your use of grammar and body language.


Get ready to work hard!

Ex-offenders and Felons can get JobsEx-offenders and felons looking for jobs must realize that they are playing a game of numbers. More job leads mean more interviews. More interviews mean more opportunities to get hired.  It's that simple. Getting enough quality jobs leads will result in a job .





Finding a job with a criminal record will require a huge commitment in time and effort. Put your time in making phone calls, filling out applications and digging for leads. Effort in practicing, and preparation will have to go with putting the time in.  Every minute you take off leaves an opening for someone else to get a job instead of you.

There are ex-offenders and felons getting jobs everyday.  Work hard and prepare well and you could be one of them!

Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs

  Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


Jobs for Felons: Five Places Felons Can Find Jobs - Get a Job Quickly!


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons


Ex-offenders and Felons can get Jobs

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Wednesday, May 30, 2018

Felon can't get Around Background Check

Felon can't get Around Background Check


Criminal Background CheckMy name is Dennis and I am getting so frustrated and depressed on what I have been going thru for years. I have 2 felony convictions nearly 20 years ago and every time a background check is done it comes up. What they are seeing on paper is not the person I am today. I have a credit score over 726, I own my own home, and I have been living a law abiding life since getting out of prison where I did 2 years- that was back in 1997 when I got out.


I am 48 years old and it is getting very difficult getting past these background checks- no one wants to take a chance with someone with a record and every time I go on an interview I have the embarrassment of explaining what I did and the kind of person I am today- but it just doesn't matter.

My felonies came when I got involved in crack, the demon itself. My first felony came when I was in a cab and lottery scratch off tickets were taken and I got charged with robbery, I received 5 years probation. The second one came because I was still addicted to this evil drug when I took 47.00 out of a back room in a bar, it was my crack head girlfriends parents bar and her mother prosecuted. I received a sentence of 2 to 4 years. This actually saved my life and the transformation began in getting my reputation and life back in order. That crack tore thru my life like a tornado and it was a blessing that I was incarcerated for those 2 years. But try explaining this to a potential employer and the door closes.

I have so much going for me now but keep on falling on hard times when looking for work because of my past, I am not that person anymore, but no one will listen. Any help or any suggestions would be of great assistance. Thank You



Signed,

So lost


Felon can't get Around Background Check



Hello Dennis,

I'm sorry you have not had much success in your job search. Don't give up hope just yet. The fact is, ex-offenders and felons get jobs everyday. Your challenge is to find out which employers will give you an opportunity. Unfortunately this is easier said than done. My first suggestion is to employ the single greatest method of finding job leads... Networking.
 
Many people got their job leads from people they know. This is called networking. 


Networking is the most effective method of finding employment leads. Most jobs are never advertised because they are usually filled by personal contacts. In fact, employers would rather hire someone referred to them by people they know rather than to painfully sort through resumes and applications. How many people do you know? Each one of them is a potential lead for a job. 

• Friends

• Relatives
• Neighbors
• Parole/probation officers
• Members of your religious group (especially ministers, priests, imams, etc.)
• Former teachers
• Former co- workers
• Former employers
• Classmates
• Casual acquaintances
• People you do business with (Hairstylists, barbers, doctors) 


Look at the list above. In each group, list five people that you can contact. That is at least 55

people that could help you in your job search. Let each person know that you are looking for a job and that any information they have for you would be helpful. Have copies of your resume handy for your contacts to give to other people. Often when ex-offenders and felons are referred for jobs, the question about criminal records doesn't come up. 

You just never know where your next opportunity will come from. Never ask for a job. Only ask for information about job leads or for advice. The more people you are able to contact, the more leads you will get. Remember, this is a numbers game. 



You can also take a look at this list of companies that may give ex-offenders and felons the opportunity to get jobs: Get this updated list of companies that hire ex-offenders and felons


Frequent readers of this blog are familiar with my next suggestion. I encourage every ex-offender and felon looking for a job to visit their local One-stop Career Center. One-stop Career Centers are very underutilized resources that ex-offenders and felons can use not only to get jobs, but to get career counseling and training.
In addition, these centers provide a long list of valuable services. Some services available are:

Career planning and counseling

Workshops (Resume Writing, Interviewing Skills, and related topics.)


Computers with internet access and word processing

Felon can't get Around Background Check

Daily access to thousands of job listings


Job-related magazines and local newspapers


Job postings and referrals


Printers, fax machines, phones, and copiers for job search use


Each center has trained counselors that provide one-on-one assistance. Many of them have experience assisting
ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs.

As stated in a previous post, you can find your nearest center here:

www.servicelocator.org






Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs



Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record







Felon can't get Around Background Check


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons 





Felon can't get Around Background Check



companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

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Tuesday, May 29, 2018

Inmates who learn trades are often blocked from jobs. Now something's being done.

Inmates who learn trades are often blocked from jobs. Now something's being done.
Inmates talk while participating in the barber school program at the Stateville Correctional Center in Crest Hill, Illinois on Feb. 11, 2014.Lathan Goumas / The Herald-News via AP

Half the states bar ex-cons from getting the occupational licenses they need to re-enter the workforce. Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle say it doesn't make sense.

by Adam Edelman / NBC News

Mike Grennan, a former convict who's getting by piecing together small construction gigs in Port Huron, Michigan, says he's paid his debt to society — but, when it comes to getting an occupational license to be a home-building contractor, he just can't outrun his criminal past.

That's because Michigan, like two dozen other states, has laws on the books that prevent ex-felons like Grennan from getting the professional licenses they need to work in a variety of blue-collar trades, including cutting hair, welding, doing makeup and cosmetics, construction and more.

"It really frustrates me. I have a really good work ethic, and I've paid my debt to society," said Grennan, 46, who has been in and out of state prison for chunks of his adult life, due to a series of convictions he said stem from an addiction to heroin.


Inmates who learn trades are often blocked from jobs. Now something's being done.
Mike Grennan finds work as a subcontractor for small projects in Port Huron, Mich., but he hasn't been able to get his occupational license to be a homebuilder because of his criminal past.Courtesy Mike Grennan



Now, a growing number of states are trying to bring down the barriers convicts face in re-entering the workforce after their release — and that includes a new raft of laws in recent months that have drawn bipartisan support and are aimed at making it easier for ex-cons to get occupational licenses in fields from which they were formerly barred because of their criminal pasts.

Since his 2013 release from Michigan's Jackson State Prison, where he served a three-year sentence on larceny and stolen property charges, Grennan has been blocked from getting his residential maintenance and alteration contractor's license — which he needs to legally work as a homebuilding/renovation contractor. That's because of "good moral character" clauses in Michigan law that essentially prohibit people with felony convictions from getting approved for more than 70 percent of occupational licenses granted by the state.

More than 70 million Americans with prior criminal records are facing similar barriers to re-entering the workforce, where 25 percent of all jobs require an occupational or professional license, according to the National Employment Law Project, a left-leaning workers rights nonprofit based in New York.

"You're looking at crisis in which a large proportion of the American public are just locked out of all sorts of jobs, which not only hurts them and their families, but creates a challenge for employers, often times in in-demand occupations that are looking for qualified workers," said Maurice Emsellem, NELP’s Fair Chance Program director.

The added irony, Emsellem and other experts said, is that so many others, in similar situations to Grennan, actually learned their trade in prison, where they were preparing to come out ready to find a job and re-enter society — only to find out that they can't.


Inmates who learn trades are often blocked from jobs. Now something's being done.
Inmates training to become commercial underwater divers receive classroom instruction at the California Institution for Men state prison in Chino, California. They are among those who can get the licenses they need to get jobs. Patrick T. Fallon / Bloomberg via Getty Images



"There's a lot training happening in construction and manufacturing inside prisons," Emsellem said. "People go through all this effort to reform themselves. And then they can't work when they get out. It's an extraordinary and powerful irony.”

This year, at least eight states have tried to fix the problem.

In March, Delaware Gov. John Carney, a Democrat, signed into law a measure removing some obstacles for former convicts seeking licenses in cosmetology, barbering, electrology, nail technology and aesthetics. Under the law, state licensing boards can no longer include convictions older than 10 years as part of their consideration process; and the waiting period prospective licensees must observe before applying for a waiver of a prior felony conviction was slashed to three years from five.

Weeks earlier, Indiana Gov. Eric Holcomb, a Republican, signed a similar bill that eliminated "good moral character" and "moral turpitude" clauses from licensing board requirements and forced boards to limit disqualifying crimes to those "specifically and directly" related to the profession in which the applicant was seeking a license.

Also that month, Nebraska Gov. Pete Ricketts, a Republican, signed bill mandating that occupational licensing boards render their decisions about whether past convictions would be considered disqualifying before applicants spend time and money on training and classes. Previously, applicants had to complete relevant training before even applying for their license.

Similar laws have gone into effect this year in Tennessee, Wyoming, Kansas, Maryland and Massachusetts. And since 2015 — following a set of best practices for state lawmakers published by the Obama White House regarding occupational licensing reform — at least seven other states have put laws on the books lessening licensing restrictions for applicants with criminal histories, according to the Institute for Justice, a libertarian-leaning public interest law firm.

The restrictions were originally enacted to increase public safety by ensuring that licensed tradespeople met high standards, experts said. But states that have maintained such obstacles to re-entering the workforce for former convicts have actually seen public safety harmed, according to a widely cited 2016 study by Arizona State University economics professor Stephen Slivinski, because the laws result in significantly higher rates of criminal recidivism. The study also found that states with fewer restrictions have lower rates of recidivism.

Even as bipartisan support in state capitals across the U.S. for reform is growing, not everyone's on board.

Bill Cobb, who now works as the deputy director for the ACLU's Campaign for Smart Justice, knows all about it.

In 1993, Cobb, then a 24-year-old college student in Philadelphia and a veteran of Operation Desert Storm, pleaded guilty to robbery, criminal conspiracy and kidnapping charges for driving the getaway car in a crime. After he served a six-year sentence at a Pennsylvania state prison, Cobb enrolled in a Philadelphia program that would set him up to get an occupation license for commercial truck driving.

"I took out thousands of dollar in loans, passed all the written exams," Cobb said, "only to find out that that I would not even be able to get a job driving as a result of not being able to get an occupational license."

Cobb later found work as a telemarketer before embarking on an advocacy career to help people who faced a similar predicament coming out of prison. "I did my time. I was ready to move on and live my life well," he said.

Pennsylvania has to date rejected substantial changes in its licensing laws.


Updated List of Companies that Hire Ex-offenders and Felons




Eric Mayo

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