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Showing posts with label ex offender employment. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ex offender employment. Show all posts

Thursday, May 16, 2019

Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record

 Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record


Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record
Hello Eric,

My name is Steve.  I am 24 years old.  In 2009 I committed a crime consisting of Vandalism, Burglary, and Arson. I had never been in trouble my entire life and grew up in a strict household.  I was with five other guys and I was the oldest.  I was the only one to turn myself in and give a full statement on the matter. It landed me on a four year probation term and after that, it will be expunged from my record. (THAT WAS THE PLEA AGREEMENT). It happened in Tennessee and now I am currently living in Fort Wayne, IN.

There are a lot more jobs up here than down there but the problem I am facing is that when I go to a temp agency that IS SUPPOSED TO HELP FELONS FIND WORK they tell me that my current felonies together seen on paper would make it really hard for a potential client to take interest in my employment. I DONT KNOW WHAT TO DO. I have not been in trouble since my sentencing. I am a proud step father now of three and I have already completed two full years on my probation.



Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record



Hello Steve,

I'm sorry you are having so much trouble.  I meet people everyday that have done some really stupid things when they were younger and are still paying the price as they get older.  My advice to them is to apply, apply apply for as many jobs as they feel they are qualified for.  I tell felons looking for jobs that finding a job is a numbers game.  The more jobs you apply for, the more interviews you will get.  The more interviews you get, the greater the chance you will find an employer who will give you a shot a job.  Felons get hired everyday.  It's all about finding job leads and applying.

You can find open jobs in your area: Click Here!

When you get an interview and the question about your record comes up, acknowledge that you made some mistakes when you were younger.  Don't spend a lot of time talking about the mistakes, but focus on the things you have done to improve yourself and your attitude since.  You may say something like this:

I was into some things when I was younger that landed me in jail.  Jail is a tough place to be but I made the best of a bad situation.  I had a job which taught me respect for authority and patience through hard work.  I can honestly say, today I am a different person than I was going in.  If you give me this opportunity I’ll make the most of it.



As far as applying to temporary agencies, you may have more success applying to small privately owned agencies rather than large national companies.  Smaller businesses in general are more flexible when it comes to hiring felonsUse the state sponsored employment service.  Each state has a network of offices that assists individuals in finding jobs.  They also provide a long list of services that help you get a job or find a career.  Some services are, resume preparation, and interviewing skills.  There lists of open jobs in your area. Each offices has trained counselors that can provide individualized assistance.  Many of the counselors have experience helping ex-offenders and felons get jobs.  You can find the nearest office in any community at:

www.servicelocator.org
Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record




WorkOne Northeast Indiana- Allen County
201 East Rudisill Boulevard
Fort Wayne, IN 46806-1756
 


GO BIGGER THAN YOURSELF: THE POWER OF NETWORKING





Jobs for felons: Ten Simple Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record  




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Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record


Felon can't get by Past Criminal Record

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Wednesday, October 24, 2018

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?

From The North Carolina Dept. of Commerce

The share of former offenders finding work in North Carolina within a year after release from state prison declined from 62% in 1998 to 39% in 2014. This article explores some of the factors that may be responsible for this trend, including changes in the labor market that have made it harder to find a job—particularly for blue-collar workers, and especially for former offenders.

In previous articles, we reported that the employment prospects of ex-offenders improved following the end of the Great Recession as the economy grew and the labor market tightened. However, data from the North Carolina Common Follow-up System (CFS) reveal that the post-release employment rates of former prisoners remain much lower than in the late 1990s—a potentially worrying trend.[1]

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?


This article, while not exhaustive, offers some theories for why the fortunes of former offenders recently released from state prison have worsened since the late 1990s. Job-finding rates have declined among jobseekers in general (not just ex-offenders) in North Carolina and nationwide over the past two decades, reflecting underlying changes in the labor market that have made it more difficult to find work. One change in particular—a slump in goods-producing jobs—may be limiting the types of employment opportunities traditionally available to former offenders. In addition, the widespread practice of pre-employment background checks has placed further impediments to post-release job-finding.

The upshot: regardless of the cause, former state prisoners in North Carolina are experiencing worse employment outcomes now than they did during earlier periods of economic growth. Individuals tasked with helping ex-offenders obtain employment may find it more challenging to serve this population than in previous decades, despite the opportunities afforded by North Carolina’s red-hot labor market.

Before proceeding to our theories, we should first note that the composition of the inmate population has changed over time in ways that may have affected the employment outcomes of former prisoners. For example, North Carolina’s 2011 Justice Reinvestment Act (JRA) redirected misdemeanants from state prisons to county jails, thus increasing the prevalence of felons in the prison population. Prisoners’ education levels have also decreased over time, including prior to the JRA, and as a result they may be finding fewer opportunities for gainful employment after release.[2]

Another possible explanation can be found in labor market trends occurring during this period. It has gotten progressively more difficult for unemployed jobseekers to find work since the late 1990s. The share of unemployment insurance (UI) claimants employed within a year after layoff declined from 89% in 2000 (the earliest year available) to 82% in 2014. Similar trends can be seen in survey data; the percent of unemployed workers in the Current Population Survey finding work the following month declined from 34% in 1998 to 20% in 2014.[3]

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?


These declines in job-finding, which mirror national trends, have occurred alongside “jobless recoveries” that feature persistently slow job growth, high unemployment rates, and pervasive long-term unemployment after the end of each recession. Economists have proposed a wide range of explanations for jobless recoveries, including the widespread slowdown in new business startups, which has cut off an important source of job growth; businesses taking advantage of recessions to streamline their operations; and structural changes in the labor market that have yielded permanent job losses in certain industries. These various forces have, individually or combined, helped create a less hospitable labor market for all jobseekers—not just former offenders.

The concentration of job losses in certain sectors—particularly “blue collar” industries—provides an additional clue in explaining the worsening employment outcomes of ex-offenders. North Carolina has followed the rest of the nation in seeing declining levels of employment in goods-producing sectors, particularly in Manufacturing and Construction. The Construction sector experienced steep job losses after the Great Recession, while Manufacturing employment fell continuously from the late 1990s through 2010. Our state had nearly 350,000 fewer Manufacturing jobs and 36,000 fewer Construction jobs in 2014 than it did in 1998.

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?


Indeed, most of the decline in ex-offenders’ employment rates can be accounted for by fewer finding work in Manufacturing and Construction. These sectors employ a disproportionate share of former offenders; in 1998, 12% of former offenders were primarily employed in Manufacturing within a year after release, while 11% were employed in Construction.[4] By 2014, the share primarily employed in Manufacturing and Construction had fallen to 6% and 4%, respectively. Employment in these two sectors fell by 13 percentage points, accounting for most of the 23-percentage point decrease in former offenders’ employment rates. 

Out of Prison, Out of Work: A New Normal for Ex-Offenders in North Carolina?



Finally, we note that employer hiring practices may have made it more difficult for former offenders to find work. The vast majority of employers now conduct criminal background checks on job candidates, a trend driven in part by post-September 11th security concerns and the greater availability of inexpensive background checks. The increased prevalence of background checks makes it more difficult for otherwise-qualified former offenders, particularly felons, to obtain employment; academic studies have found that employers are less likely to consider job applicants with criminal records. Among North Carolina employers surveyed by LEAD in 2018 who reported difficulty hiring, 23% reported that applicants’ criminal records were a reason for their hiring challenges. 

General disclaimers:

Data sources cited in this article are derived from surveys and administrative records and are subject to sampling and non-sampling error. Any mistakes in data management, analysis, or presentation are the author’s.


[1] The earliest data available in the Common Follow-up System for state prisoners covers the year 1997, and the latest data covers the year 2014. We calculate wages in the year after release from state prison, and treat any wage-earning during this year as an indication of employment. Around 3% of released prisoners are released from more than one period of incarceration in a given year; for these persons, we include only the last release of each year. Wage data in the CFS are based on state unemployment insurance (UI) tax records from employers, and thus may omit earnings from federal government employment, self-employment, “under-the-table” jobs, and other work not covered by state UI laws.

[2] In 2010, only 28% of exiting prisoners had completed the 12th grade or higher, compared to 43% in 1998. Source: NC Department of Public Safety, Automated System Query

[3] We use longitudinally-linked Current Population Survey microdata from IPUMS-CPS, University of Minnesota, www.ipums.org

[4] Here we define “primary employment” as the sector in which a worker earned the most wages in each year. In 1998, 37% of employed former offenders primarily worked in Manufacturing and Construction within a year after release, compared to 23% of all workers in the state.


Companies that hire felons


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Eric Mayo

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Tuesday, July 31, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Social Media can Hurt your Job Search

Jobs for Felons: Social Media can Hurt your Job SearchSocial media has become a huge part of the lives of many people.  It's a great way to connect and network with others all over the world.  I recently made a presentation at job fair where I met employers that have hired felons or ex-offenders in the past.

I asked 30 of the 50 or so employers "Are there any new techniques employers use to screen potential employees?" The overwhelming response was that they check applicant's social media.  Employers have started to monitor a potential employee's social media as a fast and really alternative to expensive background checks.

It's hard enough getting a job with a criminal record.  There can be things on your social media accounts that can make getting jobs for felons even harder.  There are a lot of things that employers look for on social media that can ruin an applicant's chances at getting  hired.  Here are the main things that may catch an employers eye.


Unprofessional Screen Name or Profile - Like it or not, employers will judge you by your screen name so choose wisely.  Names like "Sexy Kitten" or "Big Daddy D" may sound cool for connecting but they really won't help you get a job.  In fact it may hurt your chances to get a job.  You can never go wrong using your own name.

Information about Alcohol or Drug Use - A weekend of hard partying may have been fun but posting about it may really turn employers off.  Pictures of you passed out or impaired may be funny but it won't be to someone who may have wanted to hire you.

Inappropriate Photos or Videos - Picture and video of lewd or provocative behavior posted anywhere is damaging.  Be careful of other people posting stuff with you in it.  This can be equally damaging.  Also be mindful of being photographed or recorded in any situation that may related to criminal behavior.  Being recorded with guns, gang members or drug paraphernalia may boost your street credibility but it will have the opposite effect on your ability to get a job.

Derogatory Comments Related to Religion, Race, Sexual Orientation or Gender - No matter what your personal views are about these subjects, spouting them in a negative way on social media will really make you look bad to an employer especially if personal offense is taken.
Posting these types of things on social media is bad enough but sharing these types of things posted y others will have the same effect.  Also anyone can take anything you have posted and share it.  Even if you have deleted it, negative posts may still alive and shared all over the internet so be careful.

Social media is a sign of the times. It can even be a lot of fun but bear in mind the effect that it may have on your job search.  There are employers that may hire ex-offenders and felons.  Your social media will make a difference to someone who wants to hire a professional mature minded person.  Keep it clean, keep it professional, keep it G-Rated and you should have no problem.


Jobs for Felons: Social Media can Hurt your Job Search


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Jobs for Felons: Social Media can Hurt your Job Search


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


Jobs for Felons: Five Places Felons Can Find Jobs - Get a Job Quickly!


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Jobs for Felons: Social Media can Hurt your Job Search


Eric Mayo

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Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?

 Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?


Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?
Hi,
And thank you for reading my email. I am a 35 yr old mother who committed a mistake years ago and still today it haunts me.

In the year of 2011 I was in need of a job and came across a guy in school who said he was security guard for a masseuse. Later on he said she was hiring and I'll learn as I go. We met and had a conversation. She explained very little and as we went for a ride gave me a receipt book and said we would talk about it more in a lobby of a hotel where she was staying as she is very busy and travels most of her time. Also asked me to go with security guy to collect payment as she would order food for us.

Story short, I knocked on door with security standing by elevator.  As I walk in, the gentleman hands me money and I don't accept but ask if before I can use restroom. I had a long ride. He replies yes. As I open door, I get bum rushed by the cops and arrested for prostitution.  I had nothing illegal or dressed provocative. The security left and the lady turned phone off. I was sent to county jail for three days and couldn't call family to bail me out with charges like that. In Long Island where it happened, fought it for a year and lowered it down from prostitution felony to misdemeanor violation/indecent exposure.

It's now 2018. Plz, do you think such a case can get expunged in NYC? I went to college have associates in paralegal. Would a violation be shown? I have friend lawyer and through nexus lexus wont show up criminal record but when I sent my fingerprint to FBI, saw that even if it got lowered to violation still shows I got arrested for prostitution.

I want to become a nurse. I don't drink or do drugs. I have 4 kids 17-15-8 and two months, single mom two honor roll kids. Pls, I know its a long story. Pls, I need your advice for 2015 to be a better year. I'm always afraid to go to interview I feel they would Know and don't know if they will believe my story. My life is over.

Help



Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?


Hello,
I am not a legal professional, but to my knowledge, the State of New York allows for the sealing of certain convictions under certain circumstances.  I suggest that you speak to a legal professional about this for a more definitive answer.

You can contact the Legal Action Center for more information.  You can reach them here:
http://lac.org/index.php/lac/legal_services

For those outside of New Your state, I suggest contacting you local legal aid office.  There you can get information on expungement. sealing of records and Certificates of Rehabilitation in your state.  You may even qualify for low-cost or even no cost assistance.

Since you want to be a nurse, you will need to be licensed by the state and your record will come up.  Don't give up hope.  In the state of New York, you may be eligible for a Certificate of Relief from Disabilities or Certificate of Good Conduct.  These certificates serve as proof to the state that ex-offenders and felons have been rehabilitated and may help you to be licensed.

 Take a few minutes and look at the videos below.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: What Are Certificates, and Who Should Apply?



Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: How to Apply for a Certificate of Relief

 

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: How to Apply for a Certificate of Good Conduct


 I hope this helps and best of luck to you.

Eric Mayo

 

Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


  Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?

companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons | expungement | Certificate of Rehabilitation

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Monday, June 25, 2018

Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career

 Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career

Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career
I wanted to personally thank you for your information and motivational reassurance that with hard work and good intentions, there will be results.  I am a 32 year female and have had 11 years in the medical field specifically with management and administration.

My last job was the best by far working on a military base as a Tricare representative.  The Dept. of Defense made cuts across all 50 states and my position was eliminated.  Upon my return back home to California from Las Vegas, I allowed myself a little "vacation party time".  My choice one fateful afternoon does not represent  me professionally nor personally but just a "social choice,"  rather one of the biggest lessons in my life.  I am now faced with a Felony charge for possession and with no priors whatsoever, clean image, and of course I will be in excellent standing during my probation period of 2 years....I am now faced with the realization that the next few years and advancing my career in the health field will be impaired.  However not impossible. I will also add that I do not have an addiction and am actually a very nice, sweet, and caring girl.  Nevertheless these things happen for a reason and I want to be like you one day to share my experience and assist others in this unique situation.

With the assistance of my lawyer and definite proof of good behavior, we anticipate for the charges to be lowered to a misdemeanor charge, fees/fines paid for asap, and records to be sealed in 2 years.  I am reaching out to my network of resources in both private practice and small businesses.  There are things I can do to generate income but I want to still have my foot in the health field for my work record.  If it were not for your information regarding the Work Opportunity Tax Credit and Federal Bonding Program, I would not have the reassurance I have at this moment sitting at the library typing to you.  

I am going to get my hands on your book also to have as an additional resource.  If I ever get the opportunity to meet you Sir in person then I will thank you but as for now you are a beacon of light in my tunnel.  

I hope you and your family are well Sir. 


Sincerely,

 Michelle


 Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career

 

Hello Michelle,

Thank you for your kind words.  I tell every ex-offender I meet who is looking for a job is to put a plan together and follow through with it.  Work the plan and never give up.  

Everyone may not have the resources to hire a lawyer, but there are places to go for help.  Your local legal aid office is a good place to get low-cost or even free legal advice regarding the possible downgrading of their charges or expungement if available.  The thing about expungement is, even if it is granted, your record will always be available to law enforcement, government agencies and the court system.  

As I advise any felon looking for a medical career.  Please check with the medical board in your state to see if your conviction will keep you from being licensed or certified.  

Probation and parole officers often have information about serviced available in your area that could offer assistance to ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs.  

Having a criminal record is not the end of the world.  It may make getting hired a bit more difficult but with a plan and hard work, you can overcome a bad situation.  Felons and ex-offenders a get jobs everyday so don't give up!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record

 Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career



Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


   Lady Felon has Hope for Medical Career


companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons | Medical Jobs for Felons


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Friday, May 4, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Give former felons a chance to work

J.T. Weis - The Detroit News


Jobs for Felons: Give former felons a chance to work
Picture by By https://kazan.vperemen.com/
At Abcor Industries we live out the triple bottom line: people, planet, and profit. This is driven by my faith, which teaches that all people are of equal value, redeemable and entitled to the dignity that God intended when he created us.

After years of working in the corporate world, my desire to live a more meaningful existence continued to grow. With that in mind, entrepreneurship was the path to pursue this goal and I acquired Abcor Industries in Holland, Michigan.



Abcor has the technology for powder coating wood and is leading the drive for innovating higher performing wood materials.

Owning Abcor allows us the freedom to make decisions which improve people’s lives and drive an enterprise that contributes to the betterment of the planet. Additionally, we support important nonprofit entities, institutions and schools.

As a senior manager at publicly traded companies, I wasn’t able to deploy a felon hiring strategy — or consider anyone with a criminal history. With Abcor, we are breaking the stigmas and helping change people’s lives.

More than half of our production employees have been convicted of felonies and have served long sentences, hence repaying their debt to society. My intention is to continue to do everything possible to ensure they are productive members of a dynamic entrepreneurial company.

Productive employment is the leading force in their personal mission to build a new successful life as a responsible tax paying citizen. Productive employment is the leading factor in reducing recidivism. We are an important component of their life recovery. They are a vital part of our success.

Recently, I was invited to a forum on the subject of hiring re-entering citizens. At first, it was very encouraging to see so many human resource executives interested and open to the practice. However, each of the executives had a common theme of being only interested in “light felony” applicants. This was clearly driven by a risk mitigation approach.

Toward the end of the forum, they asked me to opine on their approach. They were surprised by my response that short sentence “light felony” applicants had a higher fallout rate and were more difficult to manage. Those who have served the longer sentences are very motivated, highly loyal and committed to the mission.

Currently, we at Abcor and other employers are urging the Legislature to pass bills currently before the state House Law and Justice Committee that would remove some barriers to employment and require objective reasons for denying parole to low-risk prisoners.

Right now, there are too many who remain incarcerated and present the lowest risk to public safety. The law requires that denying parole to people who present the lowest risk to public safety can only be based on objective reasonings. Subjective parole denial is immoral, and it’s wrong. Not only is it counter to our values, it also wastes millions of taxpayer dollars annually on keeping these low-risk prisoners locked up.

There remains much more the state of Michigan can do to help. It should continue to expand vocational training during incarceration, implement laws and financial benefits for bridging organizations that help the released find employment, housing and transportation. In my view, the Department of Corrections could and should become a powerful force by investing in these systems and have a positive impact on workforce development.

Every year, nearly 10,000 people return from prison to Michigan communities. Many are unable to find employment due to their criminal records, even though many employers face a shortage of available workers. There exists a significant opportunity to do better.

Those in position to do so, should construct systems, laws and enterprises to set the groundwork for personal recovery. There is a major win-win for society available to us all and we need to act upon it.

J.T. Weis is the owner of Abcor Industries in Holland, Michigan.


Companies that hire Felons



From Jail to a Job




Jobs for Felons: Give former felons a chance to work



companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons


Eric Mayo

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Monday, August 8, 2016

Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview
Hello Sir,

I have a job interview next week and I am very nervous about it.  I have an interview for a job as a clerk in a title office.  I have done this kind of work before but not since my legal troubles.  I was involved with a guy who was selling drugs.  There were some in my apartment when he was arrested.  Because the lease was in my name, I was charged with possession. I wasn't selling but I was charged anyway.  I know this will come up on a background check.  

Do you think I have a chance to get this job?

Candy


  Felon is Nervous about Job Interview


Hi Candy,

You don't know how often I hear stories like this.  Too many people get dragged down by people around them and often there are lasting effects.  I'm not going into a lecture about choosing better friends, but you knew he was selling, and there are certain risks involved associating with people and their criminal activities.

Hopefully you were honest on your application and you got an interview anyway.  If that is the case,
 Felon is Nervous about Job Interview
somewhere in the interview, the question is going to come up. You can handle it in three steps.

Own your Mistake - Never blame anyone else for your mistake.  Acknowledge your role in your troubles.  You could start by saying something like this, "I'm glad you asked me that because I want you to feel comfortable about hiring me. I’ll be honest with you because you have the right to know.  I have been in trouble but it didn’t have anything to do with any of my previous employers.  I was involved with someone who was into some bad things and I was arrested along with him.  I am proud to say that I have put that all behind me.

Focus on the Positive - Shift the conversation away from your problem and on to the things you have done to improve yourself and how you now only associate with people who are doing positive things.  Talk about what you have learned through this bad experience.

Talk about your Goals - Without being specific, tell the interviewer that you have goals and this job will help you put your mistake behind you.

Sell your Skills - Talk about your skills, training, education and how they make you an ideal candidate for the job.

Don't forget to be personable and friendly.  Get the interviewer to focus on your skills and personality instead of the fact that have a criminal record.  Stick to the formula above and you will do well.  Remind the interviewer that you can be bonded.  Get information about the Federal Bonding Program and how it can help felons get jobs here:

The Federal Bonding Program

There also may be financial benefits to employers that may also be a selling point.  The Work Opportunity Tax Credit offers tax incentives to employers who hire felons under certain conditions.  You can find out more about it here:


Best of luck to you!

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal record


Jobs for Felons: 12 Job Interview Tips




Eric Mayo


 

Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons Make

http://www.jailtojob.com/companies-hire-felons.html

  Felon is Nervous about Job Interview

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Friday, May 6, 2016

Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace

Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace

New research shows employers could be missing out by avoiding felons in hiring

 

 


 
Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace

The study is one of the first to assess the actual performance of felons in the workplace, according to the authors. Previous research has focused on the employment barriers themselves that result from a criminal record. A 2003 study by Pager, for example, showed that ex-offenders are roughly half as likely to receive a callback relative to equally qualified applicants with no criminal record, and that black candidates suffer disproportionately. The study found that whites with criminal records received more interview callbacks than blacks without past arrests.

The new research, which used the Freedom of Information Act to collect administrative data on 1.3 million ex-offender and non-offender soldiers who enlisted between 2002 and 2009, lends support to the so-called "Ban the Box" campaign spreading around the country that aims to persuade employers to remove the check box on hiring applications that asks candidates whether they have been convicted of a crime. Supporters of the campaign say the box unnecessarily narrows the pool of qualified applicants.

Some 23 states, over 100 cities and some of the largest U.S. private employers including Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Target Corp., and Koch Industries Inc. have already taken steps to remove barriers in the hiring of those with a criminal record.  The federal government last week proposed a rule that would prohibit federal agencies from asking about a job applicant's criminal history until after making a conditional employment offer.

The "Ban the Box" campaign "isn't saying that employers shouldn't do criminal background checks," Pager said. "It's just saying to first focus on skills and qualifications that are relevant to the job."

Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace
If adopted nationwide, such measures could help lift employment barriers for millions of ex-offenders. Today, the U.S. incarcerated population is about four-and-a-half times larger than in 1980, with more than 2.2 million people held in federal and state prisons and county jails in 2014, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Even after adjusting for population growth, the incarceration rate grew by more than 220 percent from 1980 to 2014, according to a White House Council of Economic Advisers report issued last week. More than 600,000 individuals are released from prison each year.

Given the increase of job seekers with criminal pasts, Pager sees legitimate consequences for the broader labor market if otherwise qualified candidates are weeded out.

"We know that finding a quality, steady job following release from prison is one of the strongest predictors of desistance from crime," she said. "For that reason alone, reintegrating ex-offenders and supporting employment as a key part of that process is in everyone's interest."


Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace


Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace
Eric Mayo

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Thursday, January 7, 2016

Do Employers Have to Hire Felons?

 Do Employers Have to Hire Felons?


 Do Employers Have to Hire Felons



Hi Eric, 

I was just wondering if you have any recent experience with a few of the companies on your website with regards to hiring felons. I was offered 2 positions, one by Comcast and one by Xerox, and they both declined the offer after the background check came back. My conviction is over 8 years old and had nothing to do with the positions I was being hired for. 

I have my second interview tomorrow with American Express and really don't want to got through the same disappointment. American Express asked the question about conviction on the applicant, whereas the other two companies did not. American Express still called and is taking me through the interview process, so I was just wondering if you had any insight into their company policy and if I would have any recourse against American Express if they declined the offer after the background check is conducted, since I fully disclosed everything on my application upon applying. 

I'm located in Florida, if that helps. 

Thanks!


 Do Employers Have to Hire Felons?




Hello,

Unfortunately I meet ex-offenders and felons who misunderstand what is meant by companies that hire ex-offenders and felons.  Just because a company has a policy that allows for the hiring of people with criminal records, doesn't mean that will hire all felons.  Always the nature of the conviction will be considered.

It is my experience that anyone with a conviction that involves any type of theft, fraud or robbery has a very difficult time landing a job that involves trust on any level.  Also any type of assault (aggravated or sexual) will create a difficult challenge.  Difficult does not mean impossible.  Ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs should apply for every job they feel qualified for.  They have to make the most of every opportunity to get hired.

As for having legal recourse against any company that refuses to hire you,  you have none.  Any company is free to hire or not anyone it chooses.  There is no law that states that felons have a right to a job.  Employers have a responsibility to hire the best person available.

There is a movement in this country to help make getting jobs for felons a lot easier.  The federal government is also pitching in with programs that can help ex-offenders and felons get jobs.  You can find more about them here:

I hope this helps.  Jobs for Felons: Government Help For Felons Looking for Jobs



Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2019)









 Do Employers Have to Hire Felons?

Do Employers Have to Hire Felons?


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Second chance jobs | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Help for Felons


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Sunday, September 27, 2015

Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance

Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance


 Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance
Mr. Mayo,

In the last several months I have had the opportunity to become intimately aware of the financial, psychological and emotional distress, frustration, fear and decreased self esteem of someone who has re-entered regular population from incarceration and is incapable of finding employment that they can survive on because they have a felony. They may have terrific skill sets that are not being utilized in their communities but instead are relegated to flipping burgers or manual labor positions that they cannot sustain themselves or a family on .  I am heartbroken by the dilemma they find themselves wanting to make that change for the better but the whole system is still stacked against them. Some might say rightfully so since they committed a crime to begin with but should everyone be in jail the rest of their lives even after their actual sentence is complete with no ability to show that they have learned and want to become productive in society?
The particular person I came in contact with is homeless, living in his car that he is always on the verge of losing and unable to find a decent job or find a place to live. There are some  felon friendly apartments but they have a variety of felony types and this gentleman has a young daughter and does not want to have her staying with him in an environment that he is not sure would be safe for her.

It seems to me that the impetus to re- offend or possibly commit a different crime purely out of desperation or resorting to less than moral behavior to get what they need...is great. The impetus to just give up on life is also great. How tragic!  I live in Denver Colorado. I was wondering if you knew of any staffing services, coaching services, etc that are available and focus in this area?   If you have been helping felons in your area for over 10 years can you tell me how you go about finding companies that are willing to give felons a second chance?  Are there any government incentives to businesses that are willing to help give these people a second chance at life?  I want to find out what already exists or maybe try to put some programs together but I don't want to re-invent the wheel and would love any input you could give me.
Are there any nationally recognized programs in this area?

Thank you for your time,

Dana

 Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance

 

Hello Dana,

I'm sorry your friend is having so much trouble.  Unfortunately it is common for returning citizens (ex-offenders, felons,) to have difficulty putting the past behind them.  There are many hurdles to overcome.  Below are some resources in your area that your friend may find helpful.




Turnabout, Inc.

Turnabout, Inc. is a non-profit employment, career, and education services agency that provides access to a fully-stocked computer lab, daily job leads, transportation assistance, subsidized work skills training, and job search assistance to former offenders in the Metro Denver area.


Contact:

Turnabout, Inc.
1630 East 14th Avenue
Denver, CO 80218
(303) 813-0005

Web Site: www.turnabout.org

 
Mile High United Way 

The United Way supports many non-profit organizations.  The United Way may be able to put you in contact with organizations that aid ex-offenders and felons with various services

Contact:

  • Phone: (303) 433-8383
  • Fax: (303) 455-6462
  • 711 Park Ave West
  • Denver, CO 80205
  • - See more at: http://www.unitedwaydenver.org/programs#sthash.XjwvEYa9.dpuf


  • Phone: (303) 433-8383
  • Fax: (303) 455-6462
  • 711 Park Ave West
  • Denver, CO 80205
  • - See more at: http://www.unitedwaydenver.org/programs#sthash.XjwvEYa9.dMile High United Way
    711 Park Ave West
    Denver, CO 80205
    Phone: (303) 433-8383

    Web Site: http://www.unitedwaydenver.org/  


    Colorado Workforce Center

    The Colorado Workforce Center consolidates components of Job Service and Employment and Training services in an attempt to maximize its ability to serve job seekers as well as employers. Centers are held accountable for performance outcomes based on the consumer’s feedback. There is an extensive web site devoted to workforce center information as well as employment services.

    Contact:

    Colorado Department of Labor and Employment
    Tower 11, Suite 400
    1515 Arapahoe Street
    Denver, CO 80202
    303-620-4204 

    Web Site: coworkforce.com/EMP/WFCs.asp


     
    Also check out our  List of Companies that hire Ex-offenders and FelonsIt is quite an extensive list and hopefully it will be helpful.


    Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Exclusive Updated List of Companies that Hire Ex-offenders and Felons

    Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where Ex-offenders and Felons Can Find Jobs


    Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to getting a Job with a Criminal record




      Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance

     Felon in Colorado needs a Job and Assistance


    Eric Mayo

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