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Showing posts with label job with a criminal record. Show all posts
Showing posts with label job with a criminal record. Show all posts

Friday, September 20, 2019

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record


Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?


Hello,

I have been trying to get a job with an insurance company or large law firms and no one is calling me back. I assume it is because I was arrested in 2002 and plead out to probation. I am not a convicted felon, but that is still on my record. Also, I have an arrest for battery on my record, but the case got thrown out. Can you really help? I received an email from Allstate that they want to set up an interview with me next week. Will this mess me up once they look up my background?


Mattie

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?


Hello Mattie,

Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?Let's start at the beginning.  You state that you plead to probation, which means that you were convicted.  I don't know what your conviction was for, but if you were convicted of any type of theft, fraud or robbery, some jobs may not be available to you. 

In case of any other arrests, employers are more concerned with convictions rather that arrests.  That is why the question on applications typically begin with. "Have you been convicted of a crime..."  I encourage all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs to get a copy of their criminal records so that they can answer this question honestly and accurately.  The best place to get this is from your probation officer.  I'm sure he/she can get a copy for you.

When your interview comes, as I advise everyone with a criminal record, answer every question honestly, but never volunteer information.  If the question does come up on the interview like this, "I'm glad you are asking this question, because I want you to feel comfortable hiring me....."  Then briefly explain the circumstance surrounding the infraction.  Spend more time talking about the steps you have taken to overcome that situation.

Don't assume that your legal issues are the reason you are getting few call backs.  Continue to apply for every job you qualify for for.  Don't assume that because you have a record, you won't be considered.

I would also try to find out if expungement in your state.  Expungement essentially means that your criminal record would be hidden from public view.  Once that is done, you may claim not to have a record when responding to the "Have you ever been convicted....." question.  Expungement is a legal process that you should not try alone.  You should contact your local legal aid office to see if your state offers the opportunity for expungement.  You may also qualify for free legal services.



Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record

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Can I get a Professional Job with a Criminal Record?

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Saturday, November 24, 2018

Shutting former felons out of opportunity is economically foolish

Nearly half of all children have a parent with a criminal record, and the US is losing $87 billion a year in GDP by not employing them



Shutting former felons out of opportunity is economically foolish
Ap Prison Visitor Fee A File Usa Az
(Photo: Matt York/AP)
Our nation’s failed experiment with overcriminalization has burdened between 70 million and 100 million people with criminal records. That's nearly a third of the population. Millions are marked with a scarlet letter that can lead to a lifetime of closed doors.

And closing opportunities — in housing, education and, more than anything else, employment — isn't just morally wrong, it's bad economic policy. 

The two of us don't agree on much — one of us is a former Obama administration official and the other works for Koch industries. But we both believe adamantly in the need for second chances and in the economic boon our country would experience if we fully gave them to people with criminal records who have paid their debt to society. 

And while there is some momentum in Congress to enact reforms on the federal level, the fact remains that the federal system is only a small part of America's criminal justice problem. The lion’s share of criminal records come from the states, and there’s much states can do to put fair chances within reach, no matter what happens in Washington in the coming weeks.

Doesn't make economic sense

Shutting people with criminal records out of the workforce costs the United States up to $87 billion in lost gross domestic product every year. Individuals who can’t make a living legally are more likely to continue breaking the law and are likely to go back to prison, causing costs to rise even higher. Needless, preventable cycles of recidivism strain government resources — and make our communities less safe.

If a job applicant has a criminal record, his chances of getting called back for the job or of getting a job offer are essentially cut in half. Sometimes, that bias is legally mandated. Most states have multiple occupational and business licensing laws that prohibit hiring people with felony convictions. Still more legal restrictions deny formerly incarcerated people access to crucial resources like loans, credit and educational opportunities. And if these individuals want to vote to change that system — well, they often can’t do that, either.

It’s not just individuals who suffer because of this discrimination — it’s entire families. More than 33 million kids in the USA have a parent with a criminal record.

When formerly incarcerated people can’t find housing, their children are often forced to live with grandparents or sent into foster care. These challenges can lead to behavioral and school performance problems that get in the way of a kid’s future — making it more likely for that family to be trapped in a cycle of poverty for generations.

Current laws aren't enough

There are already laws that are supposed to help folks get second chances. States allow people to petition to expunge or seal at least certain records. 

Nonetheless, thanks to antiquated and complex application processes, the steep cost of legal assistance and expensive court fees, millions of eligible Americans can’t move on with their lives.

Clearing those records should be made much simpler. Pennsylvania’s Republican-controlled legislature and Democratic governor managed to work together this summer to do just that. They passed legislation, known as the Clean Slate Act, that will automatically seal certain types of records once a person has shown that he's on the right track by remaining crime free for a set period. States as diverse as Michigan, South Carolina and Colorado are seeking to do the same.

It’s a commonsense move that will make a huge difference — both for individuals and for the economy. 

In Michigan, improvements for the formerly incarcerated were seen even during the first year that their records were "set aside," according to a University of Michigan study. Wages, for example, increased by 22 percent. 

And data collected by the Society for Human Resource Management and the Charles Koch Institute show that most in the business world are open to hiring and working alongside individuals with criminal records.

The midterm elections exposed the deep divisions so many feel in this country. It also marked the start of political careers for a number of state legislators and governors. As they think about what they’ll prioritize during their terms, we hope they'll take up legislation that will automatically seal or expunge records, to give people the chance to start over and strengthen their state and local economies. 

Our nation works only if we keep our promises. This is a chance for state legislators to lead the way for their federal counterparts by moving past the divisions that too often define our politics. It’s an opportunity to come together — to strengthen our communities, to support our neighbors, to give people the opportunity to succeed. When we say that everyone deserves another chance and a fair shot at the American dream, let’s make sure we mean it.


David Plouffe and Mark Holden, Opinion contributors
The original article can be found here: https://www.usatoday.com/story/opinion/policing/2018/11/23/former-felons-being-pushed-out-workforce-hurting-our-economy/2016435002/


Shutting former felons out of opportunity is economically foolish



Eric Mayo

Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record

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Tuesday, July 24, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Can I teach with an old Felony?

Jobs for Felons:  Can I teach with an old Felony?



Jobs for Felons: Can I teach with an old Felony?
I am a Black Man in America in 2018. I am having difficulty getting any employment because of a 1977 felony conviction. Since I got out in 1979, I got my college degree and two teaching licenses in two states-Indiana and Illinois. My “inability” to get employment seems as if this is nothing but a higher form of Jim Crow.

I realize that I am not by myself but this appears so unfair to people that are trying to live a totally new life.  So many people talk about “rehabilitation” but it seems as if it is just talk. I have also been a member of NA and AA for 32 years. I had a drug problem and I knew that if I resumed my habit, I would have returned to the penitentiary. I took care of that first because it was so important to do that.

I taught school for the public schools system for 13 years. I disclosed my felony conviction to the school system and it didn’t pose a problem to the system. Why is it posing a problem now?

I served my time and I have totally changed my life. Will I have to pay for this the rest of my life.  I was 26 years old when this happened and I am now 64 years old.

The law needs to be changed. Once a person serves his/her time that should be the end of it.
I don’t understand how I taught for the school system for 13 years and my background was disclosed.
There also has been no recidivism in my case. I can understand people going back to the penitentiary but I have only gone once. What I have done with my life should matter but it does not.  I always thought that the goal of incarceration was rehabilitation. Is it really?? Incarceration has become a viable business.

People can change their lives. By not allowing someone to change their life is such a grave mistake.
Why shouldn’t I be bitter? I will never give up in what seems as if an uphill battle. Racism is still here. I could care less about having a Black president.


 Jobs for Felons:  Can I teach with an old Felony?


Hello,

That's quite a story.  I'm not sure why you were let go after so many years even though you disclosed the conviction at the time of your hire.  As for having a Black President, the food he eats doesn't fill my belly.

Jobs for Felons: Can I teach with an old Felony?It's easy to be discouraged and start doubting yourself and society as a whole.  Instead, lets concentrate on some things that perhaps we haven't though about before as alternatives.  Don't give up hope of being a teacher.  In fact, you have already done the hard part.  You have a degree and you are already certified.  You have another very important quality.  You have experience and the wisdom and maturity of an older person.  All you will need now is to find teaching opportunities where your conviction will matter a lot less than it does to the public school system.  There are many alternatives to teaching in the public school system.  In fact I encourage many of my students who are ex-offenders and felons and also have college degrees to pursue teaching as a career.  Let's look at a few options.

Private Schools  - These schools are supported by a private organization or private individuals rather than by the government and therefore may have quite different eligibility requirements.

Career Schools - A career or vocational school is different from a four year college.  Instead of taking four years to get a degree, a vocational school allows students to get specialized training in specific career fields in two years or less.  These schools also require courses in general subjects like math, English and science just like traditional colleges.

Community Colleges - Community colleges, sometimes called junior colleges, are two-year schools that provide affordable education as a pathway to a four-year degree or a particular career.
Community colleges prepare students for jobs that require higher education or workforce training.  Typically community colleges work with employers to develop flexible, affordable and relevant training programs and partner with businesses which meet local commercial and regional economic needs. These colleges also have traditional degree programs.

Charter Schools - Charter schools are independent schools that have received a charter, which is a set of self-written rules and goals which determine how the school will be structured and run. Generally, they are able to organize a school that operates outside the control of the local school district but still funded by local, state, and federal tax money.  Essentially charter schools are free public schools that don't have to follow the same regulations as the local school district.

These are just a few options I can think of just off the top of my head. There maybe a lot more but this is a start.  If you are fortunate enough to get interviews, be prepared to talk about your conviction.  As I tell all of my students in your position, when asked about the conviction, briefly speak about it and how it has changed your thinking and your approach to life.  Focus the conversation on the time that has passed and what you have done since then to improve yourself and how you have used your own experiences to encourage young people not to make the same mistakes that you have.

Just don't let your recent stumble keep you from moving forward.

Best of luck to you.



 Jobs for Felons: Can I teach with an old Felony?


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)



Jobs for Felons:  Can I teach with an old Felony?


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Eric Mayo

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Thursday, December 1, 2016

Jobs for Felons: Will my Criminal Record Hurt my chances to get Hired?

Jobs for Felons: Will my Criminal Record Hurt my chances to get Hired?

 


Let me first thank you for the information I received from the website (Jobs for Felons: Incredible List of Companies That Hire Ex-offenders and Felons). Just by reading the details has given me a little more hope I had before finding the page.

On yesterday, I was actually offered a job by Comcast contingent on my drug screen & of course my background check. I have had so much anxiety but my faith has not allowed me to fear so much in the last few days.

My question is, should I even continue with the application? I may have a criminal record but I am certainly not a criminal. So, IF my background will stop me from getting the job, what should I do? Should I try to speak with someone in HR to prove myself worthy?

Desperate for a job,

AJ

 Jobs for Felons: Will my Criminal Record Hurt my chances to get Hired?



Hello AJ,

Thank you for your kind words.   You've gotten through the application process, you got an interview and did well on it.  You were offered the job, but it is contingent upon the drug screening and background check.  The only question I have, were you totally honest on the application if asked about having a criminal background?  If you were not honest on the application, the background check will reveal your dishonesty.  I
Jobs for Felons: Will my Criminal Record Hurt my chances to get Hired?have talked to felons where less than ones when completing the application and were hired, only to be fired later when the background check was done.  They were not fired for having criminal records, they were fired for falsifying the application.  I hope that is not your case.  I advise all of my students to be totally honest on all phases of the employment process.  I know that there is often a temptation to leave certain things off of applications, but honesty is always the best policy.

If after the background check comes back and they decide not to hire you, there is little more you can do.  It's their decision.  At that point, I would just pick myself up and keep applying for jobs.  Finding a job with a criminal record is a game of numbers.  The more jobs you apply for the greater your opportunity of finding an employer who will offer you an opportunity despite your record.


Eric Mayo





Jobs for Felons: Will my Criminal Record Hurt my chances to get Hireh?
 

  Jobs for Felons: Will my Criminal Record Hurt my chances to get Hired?


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