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Showing posts with label expungement. Show all posts
Showing posts with label expungement. Show all posts

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance

Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance Latosha Poston says she made a lot of mistakes in her life. Her legal troubles began in her teens after her first child was born in Indianapolis. Over the years, bad decisions led to some arrests, some convictions.
Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Media

Latosha Poston says she made a lot of mistakes in her life. Her legal troubles began in her teens after her first child was born in Indianapolis. Over the years, bad decisions led to some arrests, some convictions.

"Sometimes we get stuck in our past and let our past guide us," she says.

The 44-year-old has worked hard to straighten out her life. But her criminal records — all involving misdemeanors — continued to haunt her as she tried to find a decent job and place to live.

Then, while watching the local news, she heard about Indiana's Second Chance law, passed in 2013. It allows people to petition to remove their misdemeanor convictions and arrests from public view.

Indiana is among several states to change their approach to the restoration of a person's rights and status after an arrest or conviction. In the last two years, more than 20 states have expanded or added laws to help people move on from their criminal records — most involve misdemeanors. Marijuana legalization and decriminalization have played a big role in driving these reforms. Fairness is another factor, with lawmakers from both parties rethinking the long-term consequences of certain criminal records, as well as the economic impact of mass incarceration.

There are also purely economic reasons to encourage the sealing of criminal records.

"It hurts communities, it hurts counties and it hurts states if their citizens cannot be productively employed or aren't part of the tax base," says American University law professor Jenny Roberts, who has written extensively on the collateral consequences of convictions. "So there's certainly an economic incentive for allowing people to move beyond their criminal record."

The state-level reforms have helped tens of thousands of people across the United States.

Poston of Indianapolis is among them. After working in home health care for nearly 20 years and making just over $11 an hour, she landed a much better-paying job in a hospital as an operating room assistant once her records were sealed.

"I felt like something was lifted off," she says of her case. "Because now I kind of felt like a human."

With background checks ubiquitous for jobs, schools, mortgage applications and more, even one conviction — and sometimes even just one arrest — can dog people for years, critics say, relegating them to permanent second-class status.

"No one should underestimate how much even the most minor of misdemeanor convictions — including marijuana or trespassing or any kind of conviction — can affect someone's ability to get a job, to get housing and to function fully in society," says Roberts, who also co-directs the Criminal Justice Clinic at American University in Washington, D.C.

Time for change

The reform trend reflects an emerging consensus that the social and economic problems created by mass prosecution and incarceration call for a fundamental reimagining of the criminal justice system.

While reformers largely welcome the moves by states, there's concern that a patchwork of laws as well as steep legal fees, prosecutorial foot-dragging and other barriers have blunted what is otherwise seen as a rare area of bipartisan, effective reform.


Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance
The Expungement Help Desk in Indianapolis helps people with criminal records file petitions to get their records expunged or sealed.
Barbara Brosher/Indiana Public Media
"The states are really all over the map on this stuff, and they're all reinventing the wheel," says attorney Margaret Love, executive director of the Collateral Consequences Resource Center and an expert on clemency and restoration of rights.

She and others are calling on the National Conference of State Legislatures, the National Center for State Courts and the American Bar Association to study and share what reforms are showing the most promising outcomes.

"Right now it's getting harder for state legislatures to pick out a single approach," Love says. "We have to start looking at this in a more systematic way and look at what works best."

For example, there's a growing body of evidence that it undermines public safety if you don't help people move beyond their criminal records and participate in the workforce. Without that help, the chance of people returning to the criminal justice system increases.

One study estimates that the unemployment rate for formerly incarcerated people is more than 27 percent — far higher than the total U.S. unemployment rate during any historical period, including the Great Depression. The rate is even higher for African-Americans who've had run-ins with the law.

With the national jobless rate at historical lows, many companies are looking at new ways to hire additional workers. A recent survey showed that more than 80 percent of managers — and two-thirds of human resource professionals — "feel that the value workers with criminal records bring to the organization is as high as or higher than that of workers without records."

Indiana's example

As in many other states, the work of sealing and expungement in Indiana mostly falls to nonprofit legal groups and private attorneys. But in Marion County, the prosecutor's office has hired a full-time paralegal to process all requests. The county has had more than 11,500 people come through since legislators implemented the law.

While the mood nationally surrounding expungement has dramatically improved, some prosecutors and judges remain skeptical or outright opposed to records clearing. Philosophically they don't think those who've broken the law should get a clean slate.

So it helps a lot that in Marion County, which encompasses Indianapolis, Prosecutor Terry Curry fully supports the effort. He advocated for the law because he thinks people who've stayed out of trouble shouldn't carry the legal stain forever.

"If our goal is to have individuals not reoffend, then in our mind it's appropriate to remove obstacles that are going to inhibit their ability to become productive members of our community," Curry says.

While most cases in Indiana involve misdemeanors, judges have discretion with violent-felony petitions. Victims of those crimes also can give testimony. More serious felonies can be expunged eight or 10 years after the completion of the sentence.

Some crimes must have the prosecutor's written consent for expungement. Homicides and some sexual offenses are not eligible for expungement in Indiana and in most other states.

You can petition to have records for convictions expunged only once in your lifetime. If you are convicted of other charges later on, there's no chance of having them sealed.

While the process in Indiana and in other states seems simple, serious hurdles remain. Expungement can be time consuming and costly. There are filing fees for every petition — fees not everyone can afford.

In addition, the process can vary from county to county depending on cooperation from local prosecutors. Advocates in Indiana want lawmakers to make it easier for people to expunge their records — regardless of where they are in the state.

Getting the word out

Even more vexing — in Indiana and throughout the country — is the general ignorance about existing expungement laws. People just don't know they exist or how they work.

Public defenders from New York to Los Angeles say they have to do a better job of both getting the word out and pushing states to better fund these efforts.

At a recent LA-area expungement clinic, a man showed up who'd done significant prison time for a nonviolent felony. And he'd been off probation for more than five years. He still couldn't get a job. The man, who didn't want his name used, thought at first the expungement clinic was some kind of scam.

"He had no idea he could not only get it [the felony] expunged but reduced to a misdemeanor," says Los Angeles County Deputy Public Defender Lara Kislinger, who was helping him with the paperwork. "He just had no idea. And he was so grateful. And he's been having so much trouble finding a job. And we want people to be able to re-enter society and be productive members of society. And this was a case where it was so obvious it was holding up jobs — and life. And it's tragic."

Expanding public knowledge of sealing and expungement laws takes money and effort. Many public defender offices already are overwhelmed, understaffed and underresourced.

How long should a record last?

Across the nation, felonies are harder to expunge and involve longer waiting periods, and in many states, homicides and certain sexual offenses are almost impossible to expunge.
Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance
Jay Jordan, 33, is the director of the #TimeDone/Second Chances project for the nonprofit Californians for Safety and Justice. The clinic involves public defenders who volunteer to help people get their criminal charges or records reduced or expunged.
Philip Cheung for NPR
There's a new push in some states to clear some felony convictions, especially nonviolent ones.

California has taken the lead in reducing incarceration and prosecution of certain low-level drug crimes and nonviolent felonies following the passage of Proposition 47 and other measures. Past offenders can petition a court to reduce their crimes to misdemeanors.

Supporters say it has helped reduce the prison population and racial disparities in the justice system while saving taxpayers money. Funds are redirected, for example, into support services such as drug treatment and counseling.

Others say Proposition 47, while a good start, is inadequate. Jay Jordan of Los Angeles served seven years in prison for robbery. He has been out now for nearly eight years and says he still faces daunting obstacles to full re-entry into society.

"You know, I tried to adopt and was turned down. Tried to volunteer at school and was turned down. Tried [to] sell insurance, was turned down. Tried to sell used cars, was turned down. So, you know, every single step of the way when I try to better myself and, you know, be able to take care of myself for my family, there are these massive barriers," Jordan says. "And I'm not alone."

Indeed, there are some 8 million formerly incarcerated people in California. In the U.S., it's estimated that there are some 60 million people with a criminal record, according to federal statistics. The majority are misdemeanors. One report estimates as many people have criminal records as college diplomas.

Jordan now works for a nonprofit that advocates for rights of the formally incarcerated. In their work, Jordan and others are asking the basic question — how long should these convictions be on people's records if they've done their time and are working to become good citizens?

Not everyone wants these reforms. In California, some want to roll back parts of the state's criminal justice reforms through a proposed 2020 ballot initiative that would, among other things, reduce the number of inmates who can seek earlier parole and reclassify some theft crimes from misdemeanors to felonies.

"Proposition 47 was approved overwhelmingly by California voters who understood that permanently punishing people for a past mistake is not reflective of our shared American values nor is it an effective safety strategy," says Jordan, who directs Californians for Safety and Justice's #TimeDone/Second Chances campaign.

"Everyone who has an old, low-level, nonviolent felony on their record that is eligible for reduction to a misdemeanor under Prop. 47 should be able to get relief, and we want to make that as easy as we possibly can for folks," he says. "People deserve the chance to overcome the mistakes of their past, and that road to redemption should be as smooth as possible."

Some Democratic lawmakers in California are pushing back with proposed legislation that would automate the expungement process for all felonies that are eligible for reduction under the law.

Legal experts like Roberts, the American University law professor, caution that the best solution might be for prosecutors to simply take fewer minor cases to court in the first place.

"I don't think you can have an actual conversation about sealing and expungement and decriminalization until you talk about less prosecution and less funneling of low-level misdemeanors into the criminal justice system," Roberts says.


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Explained: Misdemeanors, Felonies, Pardons, and Expungements


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Scrubbing The Past To Give Those With A Criminal Record A Second Chance




Eric Mayo

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Monday, January 21, 2019

Woman gets second chance with pardon


Woman gets second chance with pardon
Monica An­drade served 16 months in prison starting in 2002, fol­lowed by three years on parole.

Her crime? Man­u­fac­tur­ing a controlled sub­stance for sale, and child endangerment. More specifically, An­dra­de manufactured meth­am­phet­amine while her 13-year-old son was home.

Andrade completed her sentence and set out to change her life. She went to AV-East Kern Second Chance for help.

Michelle Egberts, an ex-felon herself, is founder and executive director of Sec­ond Chance. She ran “ex­pungement” workshops to help ex-felons clear their rec­ords. The two-hour work­shops are packed with information including the barriers people face as they work to clear their record.

“She educates on all the records that are out there,” Andrade said.

Expungement is a court-ordered process that allows an offender to seal or erase the legal record of an arrest or criminal conviction in the eyes of the law.

An individual is eligible for expungement if he or she committed a felony or misdemeanor and was not incarcerated in state prison, has fulfilled his or her probation, and was not convicted of an ineligible crime such as rape or child sexual abuse.

Andrade, 50, served time in prison, so she was not eligible to have her record expunged. But she was eligible for a Certificate of Rehabilitation.

A Certificate of Re­hab­il­itation is available only for people who have gone to prison. They can get it after a certain amount of time if they meet the criteria. If granted, the doc­ument restores some of the rights of citizenship that were forfeited as a result of a felony con­vic­tion. It also acts as an aut­o­matic application and rec­om­mendation for a pardon from the governor.

Andrade attended four or five of Egberts’ work­shops to begin work on get­ting her Certificate of Re­hab­ilitation. She re­ceived the document in December 2016.

“There is an 11-page ques­tionnaire just from the courts, from the DA’s office, that needs to be addressed, and if it’s not addressed cor­rect­ly you’re not going to get your COR,” Egberts said.

The application package includes character refer­en­ces from at least four peop­le who know you went to prison and have turned your life around. Andrade had at least 10 letters of rec­om­mendation. Andrade submitted her application for the pardon, including another seven pages of ques­tions, in August 2017.

Former California Gov. Jerry Brown signed An­drade’s pardon on Nov. 21.

“She’s our first pardon,” Egberts said.

Egberts estimated Sec­ond Chance has helped more than 2,000 people ex­punge their records since 2012.

“Everybody is eligible so I don’t discriminate,” Eg­berts said

However, she noted in­div­iduals who committed crimes such as murder, rape, or kidnapping are not eligible for a certificate of rehabilitation.

Andrade visited Egberts’ Mojave home to talk about her pardon and how she is working toward creating a bet­ter life for herself and her family.

Andrade’s 13-year-old son, Carlos Boquin, is now 30.

“He is my idol because he never gave up on me,” An­drade said.

Boquin continues to help his mother and her two youngest children, his sis­ters, after Andrade’s hus­band was deported back to Guatemala six years ago. She lives with Boquin and his family.

“It was either fall back and go back to my bad ways and repeat history again, or this time, my son said, ‘Mom, I’ll watch the kids, you go to school,’ ” An­dra­de said.

Andrade went to school. She received an associate of arts degree in 2014. She received a bachelor’s de­gree in criminal justice from California State Uni­ver­sity, Bakersfield in 2017.

She is working on her master’s degree in crim­in­al justice at Grand Canyon University. Andrade hopes to become a probation officer in the juvenile div­is­ion for the Los Angeles De­partment of Probation some­day. Her ultimate goal is law school.

“I’ve been through it; I’ve experienced it. So that now I can understand and I can relate, so that if anyone wants to talk to me I can be there for them, “ Andrade said. “That’s my goal — is to be there for someone else, to help someone else.”

Andrade got involved with meth because of a weight problem.

She weighed nearly 300 pounds at one point and was in abusive marriage. She started losing weight with the assistance of a doc­tor who prescribed fen­flur­mine-phentermine, or fen-phen, an anti-obesity treat­ment later found to cause potential fatal heart prob­lems that led to its with­drawal from the mar­ket.

Andrade met drug traf­fick­ers through her for­mer sec­urity job. They in­tro­duced her to meth to help her lose weight. The meth gave Andrade energy that kept her busy cleaning her house and helped keep the weight off. Andrade said she had children and could not go to the gym.

One thing led to another and Andrade eventually start­ed to cook her own meth. That eventually led to prison.

Andrade has seven chil­dren, The two oldest are boys and the rest are girls. At one point her five old­est children were taken away from her. All are now adults. Andrade has seven grand­children.

Andrade did not expect to get her pardon as soon as she did.

“It couldn’t come at a bet­ter time,” Andrade said.

After five years renting the same home, Andrade and her family face evic­tion.

“I don’t make a whole lot of money; none of us do,” she said.

Andrade is concerned that although she has a gov­ernor’s pardon, po­ten­tial landlords might see her rec­ord after a background check and deny her.

The background check will show what Andrade was convicted her and her prison term, along with her Certificate of Re­hab­ilitation and her pardon.

Egberts started AV-East Kern Second Chance with her former partner, Rich­ard Macias, a retired law en­forcement officer with 25 years’ experience. Macias now serves as director em­er­itus.

“Everybody deserves to be rehabilitated,” Egberts said.

Egberts was convicted in 2004 for grand theft. Her case involved more than $100,000.

“I have not been able to fiscally pay off my res­tit­u­tion. But I have done it and more by giving back to my community.” Egberts said.

Egberts is not proud of her crimes. She spent al­most three years in prison. When she left prison, she had a four-year degree in bus­i­ness administration with an understudy in mar­keting.

“Couldn’t find a job for nothing,” Egberts said.

Egberts still has not found a job. She has not cleared her own record.

“I haven’t had time,” she said.

That is because she con­tin­ues to help other felons. She no longer has a place to conduct the workshops, so she works from home. She walked across the room and picked up a package she received in the mail re­cently.

“There’s 13 cases in it from Long Beach,” Egberts said.

They do not make any money from Second Chance. Any money they do get goes toward supplies such as postage and ink.

“We’re looking for a home,” Egberts said.


Woman gets second chance with pardon

Explained: Misdemeanors, Felonies, Pardons, and Expungements




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Eric Mayo

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Wednesday, January 16, 2019

Ex-offender may need help to get a job.

Ex-offender may need help to get a job


 Ex-offender may need help to get a job
Hello,

I came across your blog while looking for work. First, I would like to say how much appreciate your time and efforts in providing helpful information for ex-offenders. I have read through most of the posts and your advice has given me some hope in finding work.

I was convicted of a misdemeanor charge of burglary. This occurred over 10 years ago. I didn't serve any jail time and was given 3 years of probation. Since then I went back to school, received a bachelor's degree,started my own business, and plan to go back to pursue a Master's degree.

I want to work in a youth care facility, specifically working with at-risk youth and provide counseling, mentoring, and outreach. However, if a facility is licensed by the state, live-scan is a requirement. I had the misdemeanor charge expunged, but I know that the charge will still be on record (which I had expunged). I actually had an interview for a facility and when asked about my criminal background, I was honest with that person. However, she could not hire me because of the record. She told me that I could apply for an exemption to work in the facility.

My question/concern is that from research on receiving an exemption, I would have to have the particular facility send a letter/request to the Licensing board before I can fill out the appropriate paperwork to get this exemption. Is it common for any facility to honor this request? How I interpret this is that this facility would have to support you and go out of their way so they can hire you. My frustration is that any place is going to hire someone else that has a clean background over someone like myself. So I am wondering if you have had

any experience with exemptions or clearances through the DOJ/LIvescan? Do you think it is possible for ex-offenders to get jobs in this field? I will jump through hoops and get what is needed to get hired but is it a lost cause and doing all of this for nothing?

I am sorry for the lengthy email. I've spent many months researching this subject. I really could not find much information in regards to other people's experience with this particular subject. It has been very discouraging. I would appreciate any insight you might have. Thank you for your time.


Sincerely,

G


Ex-offender may need help to get a job



Hello G,

 Ex-offender may need help to get a jobI guess it couldn't hurt to apply for the exemption and the facility definitely would have to put some added effort into it. I want everyone to understand that expungement and sealing of records does not erase them. They simply are hidden from the public. The charge and subsequent conviction will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies.

I know of ex-offenders and felons having similar jobs. The fact that you were informed about applying for exemption should give you hope if you really want this jobs. As I tell all ex-offenders and felons, they should apply for all jobs they believe they qualify for.

If this doesn't work out, you can always contact the United Way office in your area. They will be able to put you in contact with advocates and other organizations that provide services for ex-offenders and felons.

I hope this helps.

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Ex-offender may need help to get a job.


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  Ex-offender may need help to get a job.

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Monday, November 12, 2018

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job



Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job
Hello,

My name is Tim. I was reading the blogs on the web site. I have complete compassion in this matter as I am also a convicted felon. It's shameful just to say it aloud, but like the others I have accepted it and realized what I have done is wrong.  My convictions unfortunately were aimed mainly at my parents when I was younger do to an emotionally unstable home life. I have corrected my problems and own emotional bouts. I am a successful father of two beautiful little girls and engaged to the most wonderful woman on this planet. We are buying a house soon on her income....I feel less of a person not being able to provide for my family.

I was told last week by Kelly services after an interview that I had the job. It was the best news I heard since my lady said yes to that important question after we laid our baby girl down for the night. I went to work today, I loved it. I liked it so much I started to talking to the human resources person about retirement and shares in the biz. I received a phone call on the way home tonight which is what has sparked my efforts for finding an answer online. Kelly services was relaying a message that a background check had come back and they found a felony.

The conviction that was in question was a misdemeanor. I'm not even sure that will save me from what's ahead but I plan on taking immediate action in the morning. My hopes lie within the kind heart of the hr woman from the place I was employed. The conviction in '07 was not a felony, if there is any possible way to get that taken care of on a very bare income please let me know. Thank you for your time and have wonderful day.

Sincerely,

Tim


Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job



Hello Tim,

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job
Two things come to mind. First, if the conviction was on the application, It wouldn't be a question. As I suggest to all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, be totally honest when completing employment applications. It would make no sense to leave convictions off when applying, get hired and than lose the job when background checks are done at a later time.

If your only situation is that your misdemeanor is listed as a felony, one option is to have the prosecutor associated with your case to correct the situation. Often the prosecutor has the power to downgrade a felony to a misdemeanor.  If there was an error, you should have no problem getting this done.  If you have no success there, I suggest contacting your local legal aid office. There you may be able to get low-cost or even no-cost assistance correcting your situation. Often ex-offenders and felons looking for employment require some legal assistance and that is a good place to start.

I hope this helps

Jobs for felons: Expungement - A Way to Erase Your Criminal Record



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Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job

Ex-offender may need legal help to get a job


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Expungement | Pre-trial Intervention

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Thursday, August 16, 2018

The Truth About Felons, Ex-offenders, Expungement and Jobs

The Truth About Felons, Ex-offenders, Expungement and Jobs



Three years ago at the age of 22, I was arrested and charged with Burglary/With Assault or Battery (FL Statute 810.02-2a) and received a third degree felony. At the time I was in school to pursue my nursing degree; however, at this time I am unable to complete it because of my charge. I am soon to complete my probation and although I am currently working in a restaurant, I don't want that to be the end. I would actually like to find a career and not just any job I could take. Would you happen to know about sealed/expunging that would suit me? If I am unable to get it sealed, is there any professional careers that I may enter? I know this question has been brought up many of times, but I am looking for a second chance at restarting my life and being able to live independently.


Please help.


 Thank you.


The Truth About Felons, Ex-offenders, Expungement and Jobs

There are two points that I would like to make. First Sealing / Expungement is not the cure all many ex-offenders and felons believe it is. Every state has its own statutes regarding the sealing or expungement of records. Some believe that arrest and conviction records are totally erased and will never erased and will never be seen again.  In no case will that happen. Some states hide records from public view. Records will always be available to court systems, law enforcement and government agencies.  You will have to find out if expungement is available in your state and if so, how would it affect your convictions and how you could take advantage of these processes. I suggest you contact your local legal aid office. You may find low-cost or even no cost assistance. Once you find out that information, your second question will be a lot easier to answer.

Since records will always be available to government agencies, ex-offenders and felons may find it difficult to pursue careers that require licensing or certification. You may have to to do a little research to find out if your conviction will prohibit you from being licensed or certified in your state. In all other cases, I suggest that you apply for every job you feel otherwise qualified for.

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Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)

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 The Truth About Felons, Ex-offenders, Expungement and Jobs

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Tuesday, January 16, 2018

Felons must be honest when applying for jobs

Felons must be honest when applying for jobs

 

 Be Honest
Hello,

I'm from Texas. I have a Felony/Theft charge on my background from 2008 and been on a 5yr probation about 3 years now. After about 3 weeks of job search, this past week I was hired on the spot as a sales associate at Academy. Then today, I was let go because of the felony charge, which i lied about on the application. Should I try talking to the manager and explain my situation? I know, i should just be upfront and put it down on the application, but not sure how to word it properly. What are some things to put on applications, when asked about criminal history? My degree is in Teaching and so have not tried those type of jobs. I also, have experience in, retail, food service, office. If you have other suggestions, please feel free to, share them. I'm glad I found your website. It helps having someone to share this with. Sometimes it gets very depressing. I just want to get my life moving in a positive direction. Anyway, thanks for your help. I look forward to hearing back from you.

Sue

Felons must be honest when applying for jobs



Hello Sue,
 
Felons must be honest when applying for jobs
That is a common mistake by ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs. Some believe by being honest they don’t have a chance at getting a job. The fact is an employer cannot legally refuse to hire you because you have a criminal record unless the conviction is directly related to the job for which you are applying. I have spoken with former inmates who have lied on applications and gotten jobs, only to lose them later when background checks were done. Some have been encouraged to use the response “Will discuss at interview.”  For ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs, applications present a dilemma. Lie or not to lie. I advise job seekers to always be honest. If you are dishonest about your past, you risk having the truth exposed later. You may get a job only to lose it after the employer finds out the truth through a background check. You will be fired for being deceitful, not because you have a criminal record.In my opinion, these are not good practices. The best advice I can give is BE HONEST! Employers have a responsibility to know as much as possible about prospective employees.

As for applying for other jobs, you should always apply for any job you feel you qualify for. Never talk yourself out of a job.

If you chosen profession is teaching, public schools aren't you only option. You may not be eligible to teach in public schools but there are other options. Community colleges, adult learning annexes, private and charter schools are great places to start. They usually have fewer regulatory restrictions than public school systems.


I hope this helps.


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How to get a job with a criminal record



Felons must be honest when applying for jobs


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Monday, October 2, 2017

Felon wants a Military Career

Felon wants a Military Career

Felon wants a Military Career

Can I Join the Army with a Felony?

Hello I hope you can help......

Well I was charged with failure to stop after having an accident involving personal injury and I'm a little misunderstanding of what it means for it being a class four felony. I want to get into the military cuz lets face it at this point in time the chances of me getting a decent job to support me and family is really really low with this charge on me.

 I don't see any other options cuz from wut I have been gathering with web browsing you can't get certain certificates and degrees to work and money is not real good at the moment to just lolly gag so my questions are as follows

1. Can I get it expunged?

2. Is it a felony misdemeanor

3. How would I go about tryin to get in the military with this?

4. What states would this not count as a felony....... and I'm sorry if its a lot or jus very scrambled. I want the best for my child and wife so I'm a little everywhere with this but I'm looking forward to this response thank you.


Ernesto

  Felon wants a Military Career



Hello Ernesto,

Questions 1, 2 and 4 are best answered by an attorney. Often ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs need legal assistance. I suggest contacting your local legal aid office. There you will probably be able to get low-cost or low-cost legal advice. They may be also be able to answer questions about ex-offenders and felons getting professional certifications. 

Felon wants a Military Career
Just a note on expungement, it is not an option in every state.  Even in states which allow them, often they are limited.  For example, in New Jersey, where I am, one is allowed only one felony expungement.  It cannot even be applied for until ten years after the termination of the sentence.  Expungement is not a cure all.  Even if one is granted, the conviction will always be visible to the court system, government agencies and law enforcement.

Felon wants a Military Career
Don't give up on a military career. The military often accepts ex-offenders and felons and there are many career options. Your best option is the Army. The Army seems to be the most liberal as it relates to accepting ex-offenders and felons. Contact you local Army recruiter to inquire about your eligibility.

I hope this helps.

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 Felon wants a Military Career

 Felon wants a Military Career

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felon wants a Military Career



Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Felons Can Join Military

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Tuesday, September 19, 2017

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?
If I do pre-trial intervention and then all my record gets sealed once I complete the courses, what do I have to say in an interview when they ask about anything on my criminal record they should know about?

Kayla






 Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?


Hello Kayla,

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?
Pre-trial intervention is usually offered to first time offenders whose offenses are not that bad.  In different states it may have different names such as, Deferred Adjudication, Deferred Judgement or Deferred Sentence. There are terms associated with pre-trial intervention, usually a fine and probation.  In most cases when the terms of pre-tral intervention are met, the charges are essentially dropped. Because the charges were dropped, there is no conviction. Record of this can only be seen by the court system, law enforcement and certain government agencies. There will always be a record of the initial charge but it will show as dropped.  With pre-trial intervention, there is an initial plea of guilty. It is my understanding, at the end of the probationary period, if you have complied with all the conditions of probation and the fine is paid, the guilty plea is considered withdrawn, the case is dismissed and no conviction enters. This is because a conviction is not final until there has been both a guilty plea or finding of guilt and the imposition of sentence. Since sentencing does not occur before the end of the probationary term, there is no conviction.  Have you been convicted of a crime?  The answer is "no".  This is not legal advice.  If you want to get the details of your case, contact the probation officer assigned to you.


 Many ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs apply for expungement which means that you can apply to have your charge hidden from public view. Both the charge and the pre-trial intervention will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies. This may not be an option for you since most employers are only concerned with convictions

I often suggest to ex-offenders and felons looking for a job to seek assistance at their local legal aid office.

I hope this helps.

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Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Can a Ex-offender get a job with Pre-trial Intervention?


 Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Expungement | Pre-trial Intervention

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Friday, April 7, 2017

Felons should apply for all jobs they qualify for

Felons should apply for all jobs they qualify for

Felons should apply for all jobs they qualify for

Expungement gives felons a second chance

HELP! I am a 25 year old who is a recovering addict from an auto accident which almost killed me. I am highly educated in Finance/Accounting. I worked on Wall Street and was well paid as an intern. I am now on a three year probation. I was hired at a very good company in NYC before the court recently convicted me. A background check was done at that time and all was clear since I had no convictions. I turned down the job at the time - approximately a year ago. If I were to return to that company who wanted to hire me and make my contacts, would the company once again do another criminal background check? Are there any high paying jobs online I can do from home since I am educated with degrees and talented in my field? Is my life over?

I cannot attend Law School unless these felonies are expunged which is unrealistic. I don't know where to turn, I feel hopeless, I never leave my home.

I would appreciate any help or information you can give me. Thank you, God Bless.

Heartbroken



Felons should apply for all jobs they qualify for



Hello Heartbroken,

Felons should apply for all jobs they qualify for
I suggest contacting the person you were in contact with before. As I suggest to all ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs is to apply for every job you feel you are qualified for. The worst that could happen is you could be turned down. The way I see it, you will not get a job you don't apply for.

Regarding
expungement, many ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs require legal assistance. I suggest contacting your local legal aid office. There you could get low-cost or even no cost advice to help you find out what your options are in your state.  Just as an FYI, even with an expungement, your conviction will always be visible to the court system, law enforcement and government agencies.

I hope this helps.



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Felons should apply for all jobs they qualify for

Felons should apply for all jobs they qualify for

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!

Felons should apply for all jobs they qualify for


Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Expungement

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