Find us on Google+ Jobs for Felons: How felons can get jobs
  • Home
  • About Me
  • Ask Me A Question
Showing posts with label felon jobs. ex-offender jobs. Show all posts
Showing posts with label felon jobs. ex-offender jobs. Show all posts

Monday, May 6, 2019

Felons can Use a Certificate of Rehabilitation to get Jobs

Felons can Use a Certificate of Rehabilitation to get Jobs
Many ex-offenders and felons find it very difficult to find jobs after serving their sentences. There are some legal tools that are available that can be used that will make the difficult task of getting hired with a criminal record easier. One of these tools is the Certificate of Rehabilitation. It has also been known as Certificate of Relief from Disabilities or Restoration of Rights or Certificate of Good Conduct.

A Certificate of Rehabilitation is a court order, which declares that a person who has been
convicted of a felony is rehabilitated.  If a petition for a Certificate of Rehabilitation is granted, it
is forwarded to the Governor by the granting court and constitutes an application for a pardon.  (In
some cases the granting of a Certificate of Rehabilitation relieves some offenders from the sexual
offender registration requirement.)

If granted a certificate, one may be eligible to be certified in some fields that were previously closed because of the nature of one's conviction

Currently there are 14 states (and Washington, D.C.) in total that offer certificates of rehabilitation:


  •  Arizona
  • Arkansas
  • California
  • Connecticut
  • District of Columbia
  • Georgia
  •  Illinois
  • Nevada
  • New York
  • New Jersey
  • North Carolina
  • Ohio
  • Rhode Island
  • Tennessee
  • Vermont
Each state has it own requirements for those who wish to apply for a Certificate of Rehabilitation.  Application for a certificate is a legal process that should only be handled by a legal professional.  You must get assistance from a qualified professional.  Contact your local Legal Aid office where you may be able to get free or nearly free assistance applying for a certificate.

Legal Aid attorneys may know of employers who have hired ex-offenders and felons in your area.


Felons can Use a Certificate of Rehabilitation to get Jobs


4 Benefits of a "Certificate of Rehabilitation"






Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Resumes for Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Certificate of Rehabilitation | Certificate of Relief from Disabilities | Certificate of Good Conduct

Felons can Use a Certificate of Rehabilitation to get Jobs

Read More

Wednesday, July 25, 2018

Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?

 Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?


Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?
Hi,
And thank you for reading my email. I am a 35 yr old mother who committed a mistake years ago and still today it haunts me.

In the year of 2011 I was in need of a job and came across a guy in school who said he was security guard for a masseuse. Later on he said she was hiring and I'll learn as I go. We met and had a conversation. She explained very little and as we went for a ride gave me a receipt book and said we would talk about it more in a lobby of a hotel where she was staying as she is very busy and travels most of her time. Also asked me to go with security guy to collect payment as she would order food for us.

Story short, I knocked on door with security standing by elevator.  As I walk in, the gentleman hands me money and I don't accept but ask if before I can use restroom. I had a long ride. He replies yes. As I open door, I get bum rushed by the cops and arrested for prostitution.  I had nothing illegal or dressed provocative. The security left and the lady turned phone off. I was sent to county jail for three days and couldn't call family to bail me out with charges like that. In Long Island where it happened, fought it for a year and lowered it down from prostitution felony to misdemeanor violation/indecent exposure.

It's now 2018. Plz, do you think such a case can get expunged in NYC? I went to college have associates in paralegal. Would a violation be shown? I have friend lawyer and through nexus lexus wont show up criminal record but when I sent my fingerprint to FBI, saw that even if it got lowered to violation still shows I got arrested for prostitution.

I want to become a nurse. I don't drink or do drugs. I have 4 kids 17-15-8 and two months, single mom two honor roll kids. Pls, I know its a long story. Pls, I need your advice for 2015 to be a better year. I'm always afraid to go to interview I feel they would Know and don't know if they will believe my story. My life is over.

Help



Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?


Hello,
I am not a legal professional, but to my knowledge, the State of New York allows for the sealing of certain convictions under certain circumstances.  I suggest that you speak to a legal professional about this for a more definitive answer.

You can contact the Legal Action Center for more information.  You can reach them here:
http://lac.org/index.php/lac/legal_services

For those outside of New Your state, I suggest contacting you local legal aid office.  There you can get information on expungement. sealing of records and Certificates of Rehabilitation in your state.  You may even qualify for low-cost or even no cost assistance.

Since you want to be a nurse, you will need to be licensed by the state and your record will come up.  Don't give up hope.  In the state of New York, you may be eligible for a Certificate of Relief from Disabilities or Certificate of Good Conduct.  These certificates serve as proof to the state that ex-offenders and felons have been rehabilitated and may help you to be licensed.

 Take a few minutes and look at the videos below.


Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: What Are Certificates, and Who Should Apply?



Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: How to Apply for a Certificate of Relief

 

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: How to Apply for a Certificate of Good Conduct


 I hope this helps and best of luck to you.

Eric Mayo

 

Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)


  Can Expungement help Me get a Job as a Nurse?

companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons | expungement | Certificate of Rehabilitation

Read More

Friday, July 6, 2018

How legislation can help ex-prisoners find employment



How legislation can help ex-prisoners find employment

The upsurge in the ex-prisoner population, along with employment and economic output losses, overwhelmingly reflects changes that have taken place in the U.S. criminal justice system over the years, not changes in underlying criminal activity. 

Legislation like the Clean Slate bill keeps ex-prisoners out of the correctional system, minimizing costly recidivism rates and enhancing public safety

By Dr. Michael Pittaro, Faculty Member, Criminal Justice at American Military University

In 2008, I published an article, “Prisoner Reintegration Challenges of Assimilation and Crime Desistance,” that focused on the challenges ex-prisoners face after release. Unfortunately, what I stated in 2008 still holds true today. Confronted with uncertainty, animosity, and a multitude of personal, social and legal barriers, most prisoners reenter society with the lifelong stigma of being an ex-prisoner and cannot fully assimilate into society.
The process of “going straight,” which criminologists refer to as desistance from crime, is multifaceted, yet attainable. While it’s possible, it is often very difficult for ex-prisoners to obtain and maintain employment.  More needs to be done to help ex-offenders find work especially since gainful employment is critical for successful reintegration, reducing recidivism rates, and cultivating public safety.
WHY IT’S IMPORTANT TO HELP OFFENDERS FIND EMPLOYMENT
The United States Bureau of Justice Statistics reported that nearly 95 percent of all state prisoners will be released back into the community at some point, whether it is tomorrow or 40 years from today. This suggests that only a mere 5 percent of all state prisoners are serving death sentences or life without the possibility of parole, and an even smaller percentage will die in prison while serving out their respective sentences.
However, ex-offenders are likely to have a very difficult time finding employment. A 2010 Center for Economic and Policy Research report noted that a prison record greatly reduces an ex-prisoner’s prospect of garnering employment. Even at the relatively low productivity rates of ex-prisoners (they typically have less formal education than the average worker), the resulting loss of economic output in the United States is estimated to be between $57 and $65 billion.
The upsurge in the ex-prisoner population, along with employment and economic output losses, overwhelmingly reflects changes that have taken place in the U.S. criminal justice system over the years, not changes in underlying criminal activity. The dramatic increases in sentencing time, especially for drug-related offenses, partly accounts for the spike in the ex-prisoner population. Therefore, changes in both employment and sentencing laws can have a positive impact on the U.S. economy while simultaneously reducing overall recidivism rates and improving public safety. These changes are of significant importance for African Americans. The NAACP reports that African Americans comprise 14 percent of the U.S. population, but disproportionately represent 40 percent of the nation’s prison population.

LEGISLATION INITIATIVES TO AID EX-OFFENDERS

One promising legislative initiative that is gaining in popularity is referred to as the "Clean Slate" bill. The intent of the legislation is to seal the criminal records of low-level, non-violent ex-offenders who go 10 consecutive years without another criminal conviction. The legislation will also seal the records of arrests that did not result in convictions.
The Clean Slate bill has received widespread bipartisan support. In early June 2018, it passed the Pennsylvania Senate unanimously after receiving House approval with only two "no" votes. On June 28, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf signed it into law. In addition to increasing employment prospects, the law will also improve and increase housing and educational opportunities for ex-offenders.
Another initiative gaining momentum with the blessing of bipartisan support is known as “ban the box” or “fair chance policy.” This particular initiative affords applicants a fair chance at employment by removing the conviction history question from job applications and delaying background checks until later in the hiring process.
A 2018 National Employment Law Project publication reported that, as of June 2018, 31 states, the District of Columbia, and more than 150 cities and counties have adopted “ban the box” policies in which employers consider a job candidate’s qualifications first, without the stigma of a conviction or an arrest record.
The report also noted that delaying records-related inquiries until after a conditional offer of employment ensures a fairer decision-making process. It requires employers to consider the job-relatedness of a conviction, time passed, and mitigating circumstances or rehabilitation evidence. Granted, in some cases, it might just simply delay the inevitable in the form of a rejection letter, but remember that this policy is primarily intended to assist low-level, non-violent ex-offenders (namely drug offenders) in obtaining employment, a key protective factor in combating recidivism.
Other promising initiatives include the Federal Work Opportunity Tax Credit Program, which allows a company to claim a tax credit of up to $2,400 for hiring an employee with a felony conviction within one year of the date of his or her conviction or release from incarceration. Additionally, the U.S. Department of Labor offers a free bonding program for “at-risk” job applicants, including people with criminal records, indemnifying employees for loss of money or property due to an employee’s dishonesty or theft.
Such laws are beneficial for ex-offenders and the community. Not only do they help ex-offenders obtain gainful employment to help them successfully reintegrate into society, these measures also provide ex-offenders with a renewed sense of purpose and identity that many lack after their release. By keeping them out of the correctional system, these laws also help minimize costly recidivism rates and contribute to enhanced public safety.

companies that hire felons


Jobs for Felons: The Facts about Companies that Hire Ex offenders and Felons (2018)



companies hire felons | companies that hire felons | Companies that hire ex-offenders | Employers that hire ex-offenders | employers that hire felons | Jobs for felons | jobs for ex-offenders | jobs that hire felons | places that hire felons | felon friendly jobs | felon friendly employers | how to get a job with criminal record | second chance jobs for felons | temp agencies that hire felons | high paying jobs for felons

Eric Mayo

Read More

Wednesday, January 31, 2018

Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start

Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start



Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start
President Trump's State of the Union address highlights that being tough on crime is
perfectly  compatible with wanting individuals with records to find work and become
independent instead of falling into government dependency. 
by , Washington Examiner

In his 2018 State of the Union address, President Trump said that “we will embark on reforming our prisons to help former inmates who have served their time get a second chance.”

This sentiment directly follows what Trump promised during his inaugural address, that “we will get our people off of welfare and back to work.” People coming out of incarceration face two distinct paths—they can either find a job, or they will fall into government dependency. Beyond being the main predictor of whether someone is living in poverty, not having a job is the clearest indicator of how likely someone is to re-offend.

Yet one year after their release from incarceration, between 60 percent and 75 percent of ex-offenders remain unemployed. Rather than promoting rehabilitation and independence, states across the country severely limit the work prospects of ex-offenders through occupational licensing laws.

Most states have little oversight over how licensing agencies can treat those with criminal records, meaning agencies can consider old convictions or convictions that are unrelated to the occupation. Even worse, boards can require that applicants meet vague standards such as having “good character” or not showing “moral turpitude.” These unclear requirements give licensing boards broad discretion to prevent ex-offenders from getting work.

With the devastating opioid crisis leaving tens of thousands of individuals across the country with records, vague standards that allow boards to judge applicants’ character can serve as a major obstacle for those recovering from addiction who are seeking work in licensed occupations. Because work is a core component of recovery and has the largest positive effect of any indicator on overcoming drug addiction, states should be promoting work for these individuals, not adding barriers to recovery.

Given that there are 2.3 million people incarcerated in America—at least 95 percent of whom, or 600,000 people each year, will re-enter the general population at some point—excessive licensing regulations for those with records pose a major problem to people like Texas resident Christopher Owen.

After finding work at a home security company, Owen was denied a fire alarm installer license because of a felony burglary on his record. His offense? He had stolen a $5 pair of socks from a Goodwill drop-off trailer in 2014. This incident happened right after Owen’s home had burned down and his mother had passed away. In a brief period, he had gone from owning his own oil and gas company to being homeless. Yet none of these mitigating circumstances were considered by the Texas Department of Public Safety. A crime of $5 cost Owen a career.

There are countless other stories similar to Owen’s—each more unbelievable than the last. Perhaps the least-defensible example of overreach from licensing authorities can be found in Calvert County, Md., where a misdemeanor or a felony can automatically disqualify someone from working as a licensed fortune-teller. Many of these licensing restrictions have nothing to do with protecting public safety. And paradoxically, research has shown that broad licensing restrictions against ex-offenders endanger the public more than they protect it.

Thankfully, states are acting to lower the barriers faced by those with records. Florida State Sen. Jeff Brandes and State Rep. Scott Plakon (both Republicans) introduced a bill that would allow those in prison to apply for licenses before their release date. The reform also allows those with records to petition licensing boards to ensure that they will be approved before they invest substantial amounts of time completing government-required training. And boards for certain occupations will no longer be able to consider convictions from more than five years ago, which will no doubt help the thousands of people recovering from opioid addictions and related offenses move on from their pasts.

In Nebraska, State Sen. Laura Ebke (a Libertarian) introduced a comprehensive licensing reform bill making clear that criminal histories alone should not disqualify people from work. If this bill becomes law, Nebraska boards will no longer be allowed to consider offenses that are unrelated to safely working in a licensed occupation. This highlights another kind of overreach where licensing boards impose blanket bans, which are occupational bans for any kind of felony or misdemeanor, even when the offense is unrelated to the job. One example of this can be found in Nebraska, where those with any criminal record can be denied a massage therapy license. Similar bills to get rid of blanket bans are moving through the legislatures in Wisconsin, the District of Columbia, and New Hampshire.

President Trump’s State of the Union address highlights that being tough on crime is perfectly compatible with wanting individuals with records to find work and become independent instead of falling into government dependency, whether through welfare or re-incarceration. Work keeps ex-offenders out of poverty, allows them to gain valuable skills and experience, moves them off welfare, and helps them avoid reoffending—those are more than enough reasons for states to give them a chance at a fresh start.

Jared Meyer (@JaredMeyer10) is a contributor to the Washington Examiner's Beltway Confidential blog. He is a senior research fellow at the Foundation for Government Accountability.


Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start



How to get a job with a criminal record




Companies Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Felons | Companies That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Ex-offenders | Employers That Hire Felons | Jobs For Felons | Jobs For Ex-offenders | Jobs That Hire Felons | Places That Hire Felons | Felon Friendly Jobs | Felon Friendly Employers | Jobs for Felons | Jobs For People That Have Felonies | Jobs For People With A Criminal Record | Donald Trump | Trump


Jobs for Felons: Trump wants to give ex-cons a fresh start


Eric Mayo

Read More

Friday, May 6, 2016

Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace

Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace

New research shows employers could be missing out by avoiding felons in hiring

 

 


 
Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace

The study is one of the first to assess the actual performance of felons in the workplace, according to the authors. Previous research has focused on the employment barriers themselves that result from a criminal record. A 2003 study by Pager, for example, showed that ex-offenders are roughly half as likely to receive a callback relative to equally qualified applicants with no criminal record, and that black candidates suffer disproportionately. The study found that whites with criminal records received more interview callbacks than blacks without past arrests.

The new research, which used the Freedom of Information Act to collect administrative data on 1.3 million ex-offender and non-offender soldiers who enlisted between 2002 and 2009, lends support to the so-called "Ban the Box" campaign spreading around the country that aims to persuade employers to remove the check box on hiring applications that asks candidates whether they have been convicted of a crime. Supporters of the campaign say the box unnecessarily narrows the pool of qualified applicants.

Some 23 states, over 100 cities and some of the largest U.S. private employers including Wal-Mart Stores Inc., Target Corp., and Koch Industries Inc. have already taken steps to remove barriers in the hiring of those with a criminal record.  The federal government last week proposed a rule that would prohibit federal agencies from asking about a job applicant's criminal history until after making a conditional employment offer.

The "Ban the Box" campaign "isn't saying that employers shouldn't do criminal background checks," Pager said. "It's just saying to first focus on skills and qualifications that are relevant to the job."

Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace
If adopted nationwide, such measures could help lift employment barriers for millions of ex-offenders. Today, the U.S. incarcerated population is about four-and-a-half times larger than in 1980, with more than 2.2 million people held in federal and state prisons and county jails in 2014, according to data from the U.S. Bureau of Justice Statistics.

Even after adjusting for population growth, the incarceration rate grew by more than 220 percent from 1980 to 2014, according to a White House Council of Economic Advisers report issued last week. More than 600,000 individuals are released from prison each year.

Given the increase of job seekers with criminal pasts, Pager sees legitimate consequences for the broader labor market if otherwise qualified candidates are weeded out.

"We know that finding a quality, steady job following release from prison is one of the strongest predictors of desistance from crime," she said. "For that reason alone, reintegrating ex-offenders and supporting employment as a key part of that process is in everyone's interest."


Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace


Ex-Felons May Outperform You in the Workplace
Eric Mayo

Read More

Monday, August 17, 2015

Conviction Hurting Job Search

Conviction Hurting Job Search


Conviction Hurting Job Search
I was convicted back in 2001 for numerous felonies, 14 to be exact, 13 of them was non sexual related (Stealing off ebay, bomb threats, forgery etc..) Long story short, 6 months after the police raided my apartment and took my computer equipment, I was 4 days shy of taking a plea for Probation AND a hefty fine. Well then the police send a warrant out for my arrest for promoting child pornography, which was total BS. I was running an ADULT website with 9,800 ADULT pictures on my computer, but out of that number, they found 12 pictures of underage (under 18) of teenagers or children. Well I had to withdraw my plea and plead guilty of that charge, otherwise if I took it to trial and fought that, the 29 felonies of stealing and other offenses would not be dropped and would be facing 43 felonies which I WAS guilty of.. So I served 3.5 years in prison on a 10 year sentence, but obviously now I have been a registered sex offender. I am highly qualified in the Audio/Video Field.

Well finding a job is seriously impossible, no matter how qualified I am, no one will give me a chance. I started my own AV Company back in 2006 and with any business its always up and down. Been trying to get out of the business I am qualified to do and get a "stable" job that pays even just more than $10 an hour.. Even though my conviction(s) was 12 years ago and I have been 100% clean since, no one seems to care. They would much rather hire someone with 0 experience and a bad work history than hire someone like me..

Going Through the groups that I have went through while on parole, the highest paid job that I remember an offender having was $9 per hour.. There is no way I can support my family on that income, well I guess I can, but we would be on some kind of welfare forever and live in bad parts of town.. If it wasnt for my 6 year old girl, no doubt in my mind I would have no problem just going back to prison, and that is sad to say but it is so true.

So I guess its time to start applying at fast food places, oh wait been there done that, I had an interview a few months back at BURGER KING, starting pay $8/hr! I couldnt even land that job! Very sad.. The screwed up thing is the only difference between me and a lot of other people in the world is, I got caught and they didnt." I am sure a LOT of us has done something stupid in our lifetime that COULD have landed us in prison, but a LOT of us never got caught..

I can rant and rave for a long time, but I have kept track since 2010 since I have been trying to find a decent job. I have applied at 392 places, been interviewed 72 times and have landed ZERO jobs.. So I guess maybe I need to apply at 392 more places, and maybe, just maybe I might land that $8/hr dream job!

 Conviction Hurting Job Search


Wow, that's quite a story.  Law enforcement is really cracking down on the possession of pornographic materiel containing minors.  In fact, I know of teens who have had to register as sex offenders for having nude pictures of their "friends" on their cellular phones.  I tell these kids that "sexting" pictures of minors is indeed a crime in most states.  I hope people pass this information on.

In your situation, unfortunately, possessing such materials is punishable under the same statutes as rape and other such sex crimes.  No matter what your other convictions are, the sex offense will always attract more attention.  It is also unfortunate that all are lumped together as sex crimes and therefore scrutinized by society at large the same way.

My suggestion to you is to seek employment in the video production field in the adult industry or even as a consultant.  There are sites popping up everyday.  I'm sure there is a market for your skills.  You may also consider finding another niche.  With your knowledge and experience you would be successful marketing a more mainstream product.

My only other suggestion is to contact your local United Way office.  The United Way funds a long list or social service organizations.  You may find an advocacy group that has experience with cases similar to yours or they may every suggest an agency that could use a person with your skills.

I'm sorry I couldn't be more helpful.  Registering as a sex offender has so many restrictions that finding an ordinary job may be otherwise difficult.




Jobs for Felons: Know your Rights Regarding Background Checks



Jobs for Felons: The Truth about Background Checks


Conviction Hurting Job Search



Conviction Hurting Job Search

Conviction Hurting Job Search

Read More

Monday, August 3, 2015

Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use

Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use



Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use
Ex-offenders and felons have a very tough time finding jobs and even getting interviews.  That's no secret, so when an interview finally comes, they should put themselves in the best possible position to get hired.  While we all know that the applicant wants the job, the interviewer has a responsibility to hire the best person available.

In my career that spans more than thirty years, I have have seen and used a number of tricks that interviewers use to get through all of the rehearsing and other things applicants use to put themselves in the best light.  These tricks are used to make applicants reveal who the really are.  Often these tricks go unnoticed. I am going to share with you my all time favorite interviewer tricks.

1.  The Waiting Game - I have seen applicants been made to wait up to an hour to be interviewed.  What I have learned is that the longer people wait, the more they become themselves.  The combination of nerves and aggravation will reveal true personalities.  Whether it is using bad language, complaining, or engaging in inappropriate conversation, this is a true test.  I have even seen applicants flirt with the receptionist, employees and other applicants thus exposing parts of their character.  No matter how long you have to wait, stay professional at all times.

2.  Just One of the Guys - Some interviewers will present themselves as really friendly types that throw formality out of the window.  This often will make the applicant relax (sometimes too much,) which causes them to let their guards down.  When guards come down, things slip out.  I teach my students never to reveal too much information especially about their criminal backgrounds or other errors in judgement.  Never offer information that isn't asked. The interview is not the place to tell your life story or talk about all of mistakes you have made in your life.  Never talk about personal problems, habits, or relationships issues.  Be personable but never tell more than anyone needs to know.  Never talk about to religion, politics, or sex.  Even If the interviewer brings them subjects up, these are not discussions you want to get into.  Never, ever use slang or profanity.

3.  The Big Squeeze -  This neat little trick I use to when I ask applicants into my office. I stand partially in the doorway, forcing the other person turn sideways to squeeze by.  In the few seconds it takes to squeeze by, I get a lot of information.  I can get a hint about the individual's personal hygiene, if they have smoked recently or even taken a drink.  Many employers shy away from hiring smokers.  Smokers require more breaks than non-smokers.  Smokers have more health problems than non-smokers.  If you do smoke, do not smoke before your interview.  If you have alcohol on your breath, forget it!

4.  Hold up! Don't sit down! -  To many people, respect and manners count for a lot and some interviewers will test this a number of ways.  My favorite is sitting down and waiting to see what the applicant does.  My office is like my house.  If he sits down without being invited, it may be because he lacks social graces or he is simply disrespectful.  When you get to the interview area, always wait until the interviewer asks you to be seated.  If he doesn’t offer, politely ask “May I sit?”  Never touch the interviewer’s desk or put anything on it.

5.  Butter Fingers -  Another one of my favorite personality revealers is very subtle but it tells a lot.  I may drop a pen or other small object.  If the applicant picks it up, more than likely, the person is a caring, helpful individual.  If he doesn't, it usually means he cares only about himself.


 Top Five Job Interview Mistakes Ex-offenders and Felons make 



The next five are not really tricks, but they are clever ways  interviewers weed out applicants with questions.

6.   Have you Done Your Homework? -  Often interviewers ask "What do you know about our company?"  Interviewers ask this because they want to know if you are serious about working with them. If you haven't prepared for the interview by doing some research on the company, it will show.


It would appear that you are very interested in the job just by doing some research.  Some things you should find out:

How old is the company.

Number of locations

Number of employees

What the company business

Who is the competition?

If it is a large company, you may find this information on the internet or the library.  If you are interviewing with a small local business, you may get the information from the receptionist if you call.



7.  Money, Money, Money -  "How much money are you looking for?"  This is a tricky question that is used to disqualify applicants.  It's tricky because if you give a dollar amount that is too low, you may be paid less than others doing the same job.  If you give an amount that is too high, you may disqualify yourself.  I teach my students to never talk about money until someone offers them a job.  So, the response may be "Are you offering me this job?"  Whether the answer is yes or no, the response should be something like this, "I want to be paid fairly.  I know you will make me a fair offer."    If that answer is not enough, remember no dollar amounts, you should answer, "I want as much as you can afford to pay me."

8.  I'm Feeling Weak - We all have gotten the question, "What is your greatest strength?" and we pretty much know how to handle that one.  People have a a lot of trouble with the follow question which is sure to follow- "What is your biggest weakness?"  Most people blow that one because they forget that the interview is used to sell yourself.  With that in mind, do you think I would be foolish enough to tell you about a real fault of mine that might cost me the opportunity to get a job?  Interviewers count on it!  Every has weaknesses, but don't not tell the interviewer anything that can be used against you.  There are two ways to handle this.  You can present a strength you have as a weakness or you can offer a technical weakness as long as it has nothing to do with the job.  You might say "I get really upset at myself when I don't finish everything on time." It looks like a weakness, but it come across really well because it tells how important it is for you to finish thing promptly.   The second option is to offer a technical weakness (as long as it has nothing to do with the job."  It may sound like this, "I want to brush up on my writing skills.  I write ok, but I want to get better."

9.  Bossy, Bossy - This question is used to spot a troublemaker and it works every time, "Tell me about the worst boss you've ever had?" Under no circumstances should you ever say anything negative about any past job or supervisor.  To an interviewer, only a troublemaker would speak ill of former job or company. In the mind of the interviewer, you were a problem.  That's why you are no longer there.   It's ok to quit a job or even get fired and there are positive ways to explain even a not so great situation.  You might say something like.  "I have had bosses, some better than others.  I have learned something from all of them even if it is what not to do."

10. I have a Question - The final one is a question that is not tricky at all, but an interviewer can find out a lot about what on an applicant's mind with it.    "Do you have any questions for me?"  I am amazed how often applicants answer "no" to this question.  By answering "no" job searchers pass up a golden opportunity to finish off on an extremely high note.  Some really great questions are:



Why is this position open?

What are the day to day duties of this position?

 hat are some of the more difficult problems one would have to face in this job?

What are the opportunities for advancement?

Did you know I can be bonded?  (Federal Bonding Program)

By asking questions like these the interviewer will get the impression that you are interested in more than just a paycheck, which looks really good.


Ex-offenders and felons have a tough time getting interviews so when they come, they have to make them count.  These are some clever tricks that a seasoned interviewer would use to find out more about the person sitting in front of them than what they are saying.  Now you will recognize them when you encounter them and make them work to your advantage!

Best of luck on your interview!


Jobs for Felons: Dirty Little Tricks Interviewers Use




  Jobs for Felons: Preparing to ace the Interview

Jobs for ex-offenders and felons looking for jobs : What to wear to the interview






Please Rate This Post at the Top!


Are you an ex-offender or felon who has a question about finding a job with a criminal record?  I have been helping ex-offenders and felons get jobs for over ten years and I feel I have an understanding of what works. I will be updating this blog often. I will answer specific questions relating to getting a job with a criminal record on this blog so feel free to send me your questions.   The right information could help felons get jobs.  You could have your question answered right here. Email your question to: BelievePublications@comcast.net.


If you are a felon and really serious about getting a job or you want to help someone you care about get a job, check out this link: From Jail to a Job 




Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use


Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use

Jobs for Felons: Ten Tricks Interviewers Use

Read More

Saturday, January 24, 2015

Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts

 Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts



 Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts
Hi Mr. Mayo,

My fiance is up for parole in March 2014.  His family and I are trying to find job leads and scholarship programs that will help him once he is released. He has good behavior in prison and has held a job in the prison kitchen. All this will look good to the parole board.  He is an excellent artist and wants to be a graphic artist and also learn computer animation.

He was convicted of robbery and possession of a weapon while committing a felony.  He was 18 at the time and has done six years if a 12 year sentence.  He has an excellent chance of parole if can prove he has some type of direction and goals.  What I want to know is, where can he get an education in graphics that he wants and can he get any type of scholarships or grants to do what he wants to do?  How can he do this?  What does he have to do?  I know that if he can get paroled, he will prove that he is not that same person that committed that crime when he was a kid.

Please help,

Katy

Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts


Hello Katy,

 Felon wants a Career in Graphic ArtsYour fiance seems to have a good support system that he will need when he is paroled.  As far a him pursuing a career in graphics, I suggest first contacting your local community college.  Community colleges are not just for degrees anymore.  Many community colleges these days offer career training for growing
occupations.

Speak to the financial aid office at whatever college you look into.  They will be able to tell you which financial aid programs if any, your fiance may qualify for and how to apply.  It is in their best interest to give you good information.  If your local college does not offer the courses he is looking for, they will tell you who does.

Best of luck to you both.




Eric Mayo

Jobs for Felons: How to find a job in Graphic Arts



Jobs for Felons: How to find Graphic Design Jobs





Jobs for Felons: How to become a Graphic Designer





 Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts

 Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts

Felon wants a Career in Graphic Arts

Read More

Friday, September 26, 2014

Veterans looking for Jobs

 Veterans looking for Jobs


Veterans looking for Jobs
My husband is a retired army veteran with a few minor misdemeanors and a Wanton Endangerment charge. Any ideas of a network or job market we could job hunt in? The Wanton Endangerment is from an ex girlfriend claiming to point a gun at her. Looks ugly on paper. This was 3.5 yrs ago.

Where do we begin to take our first step?



Please help and thank you for your time



 Veterans looking job Jobs

 Hello,

I have a question.  Is the Wanton Endangerment  a conviction or merely a charge?  I ask because employers are more interested in convictions rather than charges.  You may want to get that information.  Most applications only ask about convictions.  No need to list something that is not a conviction.

In regards to networking,  the Veterans Administration has several programs to assist veterans looking for jobs.

You can get more information on these programs and other forms of veteran assistance here:


Many employers give veterans preference when hiring.  There are even tax incentives offered to employers for hiring veterans.  Your husband may want to point this out when interviewing for jobs.  The Work Opportunity Tax Credit offers employers tax breaks for hiring individuals that are in certain targeted segments of the population.  Veterans are one of the targeted groups.  You can get more information on the WOTC here:


I hope this helps

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Where can Ex-offenders Find Jobs

Jobs for Ex-offenders and Felons: Ten Steps to Getting a Job with a Criminal Record



Veterans looking job Jobs

Veterans looking job Jobs

This Book Has Helped Thousands of Felons Get Jobs ! You can get a copy of this book for as little as $5.00 Click Here!


Veterans looking job Jobs


  Eric Mayo

Read More